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Breastfeeding

OPINION
January 17, 2004
Re "Formula for Guilt," by Peggy Orenstein, Opinion, Jan. 11: In developing the National Breastfeeding Awareness Campaign, the Ad Council found that women in the focus group research, both formula-feeding mothers and breast-feeding mothers, did not express guilt regarding their decisions related to breast-feeding. When women in 42 focus groups, conducted in several cities throughout the country, were shown the risks of not breast-feeding, i.e., higher rates of ear infections, asthma, Type 1 diabetes and obesity, the mothers did not feel guilt; they were surprised and angry that they had not been told this information.
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OPINION
June 13, 2005
Re "Lactivists, Chill Out!" Commentary, June 9: I think what is most important for women who are breast-feeding their babies to get a clue on is that the majority of us do not want to be near women who are breast-feeding. I breast-fed two babies for nine months each and would never have dreamed of subjecting people near me, much less sitting 6 inches away, to something so private. If you have to be in that situation, pump what you need. Pulling out a part of your body that is typically left covered is tacky, even if you are nourishing your baby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1999
Re "Woman Sues Bookstore Over Right to Breast-Feed," April 29. Being a woman myself, I find Kerry Madden-Lunsford's suit against Borders Books & Music very upsetting. The 1998 state law that allows public breast-feeding is obviously a very new law. I would guess that there are many people who were unaware of the law, including two Borders employees who confronted Madden-Lunsford. The Borders general manager, in my opinion, has done everything to rectify the situation, including a public apology, a sign welcoming those who feel it is necessary to breast-feed in public and the promise to better educate employees.
NEWS
June 30, 1996
"Facts about Bras, Breasts and Cancer" (June 19) contains some misleading information on breast-feeding. First, breasts do produce early milk, or colostrum, days or weeks before childbirth. Colostrum--digestible, high-calorie and loaded with immunities--then gives way to mature milk in the days following birth. Second, while breast-feeding does not absolutely prevent maternal breast cancer, women who breast-feed do have dramatically lower rates of breast, uterine and ovarian cancers.
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The American Academy of Pediatrics said mothers should breast-feed for at least a year--six months longer than previously advised. The guidelines also urge employers to provide a place for women to nurse and recommend that insurance companies pay for services like lactation consultations. Breast-feeding provides individual health benefits as well as significant social and economic benefits to the nation, including reduced health-care costs, the academy wrote in its journal Pediatrics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1995 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
In observance of World Breastfeeding Week, the La Leche League has planned its World Walk for Breastfeeding today in Griffith Park. The one-mile walk, which starts at 11 a.m., will raise funds for the group that supports and gives information to mothers who choose to breast-feed their children.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | ANN ROVIN
Are the mechanics of breast-feeding affected by the presence of breast implants? The research is scant, but Dr. Marianne Neifert, a pediatrician and breast-feeding authority, thinks so. "Difficulties in breast-feeding after augmentation surgery are something I believe I have seen for 10 years," says Neifert, medical director of the lactation program at Presbyterian/St. Luke's Medical Center in Denver. There are several possible reasons, Neifert says, adding that further research is merited.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2003 | From Associated Press
An Australian talk show host has breast-fed her new son on live national television, angering some viewers but winning praise from the medical profession. Kate Langbroek nursed her newborn, Lewis, on "The Panel" late-night program when she returned from maternity leave Wednesday. Viewers were mixed about the display, the Ten Network said Thursday. "It was definitely split," a network spokeswoman said. "Some people were very supportive.... Others were of course having a bit of a hissy."
HEALTH
June 24, 2002
Re: "Analysis Questions Link Between Breast Milk, IQ" (June 10): Breast-feeding and IQ are linked. There are no studies showing that formula-fed babies are smarter or healthier, just as there are no studies showing that cigarette smokers live longer or have less heart disease and lung cancer. Further, breast-feeding is dose-related. For maximum mental growth, breast-feeding for at least a year is recommended. (See "The Association Between Duration of Breastfeeding and Adult Intelligence," Journal of the American Medical Assn.
HEALTH
November 28, 2005 | From Times wire reports
Breast-feeding, backed for the health effects it bestows on the baby, also appears to reduce the mother's risk of developing adult-onset diabetes. The protective effect probably comes from the way breast-feeding uses up energy and keeps blood sugar levels stabilized, said the report from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston.
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