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NEWS
February 9, 1989 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
There's just one thing that keeps Paul Brecht's and Joan Conseicao's work from being an unqualified nightmare. After all, if running what is by far the most populous boardinghouse in Orange County isn't enough, every one of their nearly 7,000 boarders requires feeding, attention and health care for about 11 months out of the year. The saving grace is that their boarders are not people. They're orchids.
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NEWS
October 31, 1991
It makes perfect sense. Horses can be boarded at a stable, children can be sent to boarding school and prized pets can be sent to kennels while their owners are away. So why not board your out-of-season orchid as well? Paul Brecht, owner of Brecht Orchid Gardens in Costa Mesa, allows orchid owners who are too busy to care for them--or when they are not in bloom--to deposit plants in his greenhouse. Some owners have just a few plants, while others have as many as several hundred in Brecht's care.
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NEWS
October 31, 1991
It makes perfect sense. Horses can be boarded at a stable, children can be sent to boarding school and prized pets can be sent to kennels while their owners are away. So why not board your out-of-season orchid as well? Paul Brecht, owner of Brecht Orchid Gardens in Costa Mesa, allows orchid owners who are too busy to care for them--or when they are not in bloom--to deposit plants in his greenhouse. Some owners have just a few plants, while others have as many as several hundred in Brecht's care.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
There's just one thing that keeps Paul Brecht's and Joan Conseicao's work from being an unqualified nightmare. After all, if running what is by far the most populous boardinghouse in Orange County isn't enough, every one of their nearly 7,000 boarders requires feeding, attention and health care for about 11 months out of the year. The saving grace is that their boarders are not people. They're orchids.
HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 1993 | SHARON COHOON
The best way to find out more about growing cymbidium orchids is to talk to people who grow them. Following are some good places to meet orchid enthusiasts: * Orange County Branch Cymbidium Society of America: Meets the second Thursday of the month (November through June) at 8 p.m. at the Westminster Community Services Building, 8200 Westminster Blvd., Westminster. * Newport Harbor Orchid Society: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 8 p.m.
NEWS
August 12, 1989 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Times Staff Writer
Tomatoes and peppers really take off in the summer, and many gardeners are happy to let nature take its course. But letting all that growth go unchecked can produce tall, lanky plants with lots of leaves and little fruit. Plants can get four- to six-feet tall before they even flower. A little judicious pruning can help the plant direct more of that growth energy into fruit rather than foliage, according to the California Assn. of Nurserymen.
HOME & GARDEN
February 5, 2000 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tropical orchids look appealing, but these beautiful flowers have a reputation for being fussy. While this is true for some varieties, phalaenopsis--also known as moth orchids--are easy to grow indoors. "Phalaenopsis are considered the easiest houseplant orchid," says Tony Glinskas, chairman of the 20th Annual Fascination of Orchids International Show & Sale, which runs through Sunday at South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa.
HOME & GARDEN
September 21, 1991 | DIANA O'BRIEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When it comes to gardening, people have been trying to fool Mother Nature for thousands of years. One of the earliest known greenhouses was built around AD 30 to grow cucumbers for the Emperor Tiberius. Since glass had not yet been invented, who but an emperor could afford to have window painstaking constructed out of bits of translucent mica?
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | MAX JACOBSON, Max Jacobson is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition
The intersection of Harbor and Newport boulevards is getting to be one of Costa Mesa's busiest. A multiplex cinema has just opened, and the bustling Triangle Square mall just across the street is a big draw. But there's action just to the north of that intersection as well, a more personal stretch of Harbor Boulevard with lots of interesting places to stop and while away a morning.
HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 1993 | SHARON COHOON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Not all orchids need a hot, steamy, equatorial jungle or a temperature-regulated greenhouse to keep them happy. Cymbidium orchids, for instance, prefer nippy nights just like the ones we've been having. In fact, without them, they refuse to bloom. Cymbidiums need at least a 20% difference in temperature between day and night in order to send out flower stalks, according to Paul Brecht of Brecht Orchid Gardens in Costa Mesa.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | KAREN M. REED, Karen M. Reed is a free-lance writer based in Newport Beach.
Envision the orchid. No matter the species, the graceful flowers hold an exotic mystique all their own--and the mystery is often overwhelmingly compounded when one fancies trying to grow them. Fears of temperamental plants which bloom only in perfect greenhouse environments are enough to keep the average gardener from venturing into the realm of orchid culture.
HOME & GARDEN
November 16, 1996 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Got any sickly plants in need of a fertilizer boost? If so, bypass the roots and spray soluble fertilizer on the leaves. Known as foliar feeding, this method has a number of benefits. "The main advantage of foliar feeding is that nutrients enter the plant more quickly," said Christopher Totten, a certified ecological horticulturist for Oregon-based Whitney Farms, which produces organic fertilizers available in many Orange County nurseries.
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