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Breck Eisner

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
Filming "Sahara," the opening salvo in the Dirk Pitt adventures based on the bestselling novels by Clive Cussler, would have been daunting for the most veteran director. Consider a budget topping $100 million; a demanding, world-famous author with strict script and cast approval who wound up suing the producers; remote locations in Morocco, eight hours from the nearest airport, where the temperature tops out at 130 degrees (you have to carry around water to fight off instant dehydration).
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BUSINESS
March 5, 2007 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
In Hollywood it pays to have connections, even if you are the son of former Disney Chairman Michael Eisner. Stories of back-lot feuding, deceitful negotiations and high-strung egos are all part of a drama unfolding in the wood-paneled Los Angeles County Superior Court room of Judge John P. Shook. Names such as Breck Eisner, Tom Cruise, Matthew McConaughey, Christian Bale, Penelope Cruz, Heath Ledger and Jack Black spill from the witness stand.
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BUSINESS
March 5, 2007 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
In Hollywood it pays to have connections, even if you are the son of former Disney Chairman Michael Eisner. Stories of back-lot feuding, deceitful negotiations and high-strung egos are all part of a drama unfolding in the wood-paneled Los Angeles County Superior Court room of Judge John P. Shook. Names such as Breck Eisner, Tom Cruise, Matthew McConaughey, Christian Bale, Penelope Cruz, Heath Ledger and Jack Black spill from the witness stand.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2005 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
Filming "Sahara," the opening salvo in the Dirk Pitt adventures based on the bestselling novels by Clive Cussler, would have been daunting for the most veteran director. Consider a budget topping $100 million; a demanding, world-famous author with strict script and cast approval who wound up suing the producers; remote locations in Morocco, eight hours from the nearest airport, where the temperature tops out at 130 degrees (you have to carry around water to fight off instant dehydration).
BUSINESS
February 11, 2005 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
By his own admission, Michael Eisner isn't ready to imagine life beyond the wonderful world of Disney. He has said he'll soon retire as chief executive. But beyond that, "I'm not thinking about it," he said in a recent interview with the Los Angeles Times. "I have pushed it out of my mind." As Walt Disney Co. shareholders gather today in Minneapolis, reality may start to sink in.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2000 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new version of "The Invisible Man" materializes tonight on cable's Sci Fi Channel. If H.G. Wells were alive, he probably wouldn't hate it. But there's a good chance he wouldn't embrace it either. Not as clever or enjoyable as it could be, this new adventure series at best is passable escapism from executive producer Matt Greenberg ("Halloween: H20").
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010 | By Robert Abele
Who wouldn't want the best for a movie with such a deliciously reactionary name like "The Crazies"? It first belonged to zombiemeister George A. Romero's 1973 indie provocation, centered on a small town's mental and physical disintegration following a mysterious water contamination. It now marks the latest in jacked-up horror remakes ("Texas Chainsaw Massacre," "Halloween," "The Hills Have Eyes") that replace iconoclastic chills with paint-by-numbers shocks. Things start promisingly spooky enough in director Breck Eisner's version, when inhabitants of Iowa farming community Ogden Marsh begin shifting from folksy to frowny, and finally homicidal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
It might be useful for filmmakers to note that with popcorn movies, the audience's suspension of disbelief is going to dissipate in direct proportion to any attempt to call attention to Serious Issues. It's probably a bad thing if the synopsis begins to sound like the table of contents from last week's Time magazine. A case in point is "Sahara," an updated adaptation of Clive Cussler's 1992 novel featuring his serialized, formulized maritime adventurer Dirk Pitt.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2004
Alexander. Precocious conqueror Colin Farrell has flashbacks to childhood and his rise to power as he expands his great empire. Oliver Stone directs. With Angelina Jolie, Anthony Hopkins and Val Kilmer. Warner Bros., Nov. 5. Catwoman. Shy artist Halle Berry is transformed into a feline powerhouse walking the line between good and evil. Benjamin Bratt and Sharon Stone also star. Directed by French effects wiz Pitof. Warner Bros, July 30. The Chronicles of Riddick.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2007 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
The legal showdown between media mogul Philip Anschutz and novelist Clive Cussler over the film flop "Sahara" took a dramatic turn in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom Wednesday when Anschutz's lead attorney unexpectedly rested his case.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2005 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
By his own admission, Michael Eisner isn't ready to imagine life beyond the wonderful world of Disney. He has said he'll soon retire as chief executive. But beyond that, "I'm not thinking about it," he said in a recent interview with the Los Angeles Times. "I have pushed it out of my mind." As Walt Disney Co. shareholders gather today in Minneapolis, reality may start to sink in.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2009
Creature features return Several classic horror titles are stepping out of the crypt. "Creature From the Black Lagoon," the remake of the 1950s camp classic about a mythic monster who terrorizes scientists, and "The Brood," David Cronenberg's 1979 science-fiction/horror film about a woman who telepathically instructs her children to act out violently, are both landing new directors. Carl Rinsch, the hot commercials director who recently signed on to direct the samurai adventure "47 Ronin," is now in talks to direct Universal's "Black Lagoon," updating the story of the Gill-man and the Amazonian havoc he wreaks.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2007 | Glenn F. Bunting, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ON an old studio lot outside London, a production crew began work on the movie "Sahara" in November 2003 by staging the crash of a vintage airplane. But when the film opened in theaters in April 2005, the sequence had been deleted. "In the context of the movie, it didn't work," said director Breck Eisner. The cost of the 46-second clip: more than $2 million. This kind of spending, according to accounting records, helped turn "Sahara" into one of the biggest financial flops in Hollywood history.
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