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Breeders Cup Horse Race

SPORTS
April 30, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
ESPN, which less than two weeks ago acquired "Monday Night Football," has picked up another major sports property. It was announced Friday that ESPN, beginning in 2006, would televise horse racing's Breeders' Cup each fall, along with major stakes races leading to Cup day. ESPN has an eight-year agreement with the National Thoroughbred Racing Assn. and Breeders' Cup Ltd. The Breeders' Cup has been televised on NBC since its inception in 1984.
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SPORTS
October 31, 2004 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Horses from Europe have won the Breeders' Cup Juvenile before. Arazi came from France to score an electrifying win at Churchill Downs in 1991. Johannesburg, saddled by Irish trainer Aidan O'Brien, won at Belmont Park in 2001. Those wins were not totally unexpected. Arazi, trained by Francois Boutin, was favored in his race, and Johannesburg went into his Breeders' Cup race undefeated in six starts.
SPORTS
October 27, 2004 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
The decision to run Azeri in the $4-million Breeders' Cup Classic here Saturday at Lone Star Park apparently was made during a brief phone conversation between trainer Wayne Lukas and the 6-year-old mare's owner, Michael Paulson, on Monday night. "I'd like to swing for the fences, Wayne," Paulson said. "How do you feel about that?" "Let's go," Lukas said.
SPORTS
October 26, 2004 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Gil Moutray, onetime commissioner of the New Mexico Racing Commission, gets credit for bringing Gerald J. Ford into the horse business. Ten years ago, Moutray invited his friend to join him at the Breeders' Cup. Now Ford, smitten by the game from the start, is on the edge of a rare feat: winning the Breeders' Cup Classic for the second time.
SPORTS
October 23, 2004 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
The Juvenile Stakes, for 2-year-old colts and geldings, has long held a featured position on Breeders' Cup cards. But not this year. When the eight Breeders' Cup races are run at Lone Star Park Oct. 30, the Juvenile is likely to be the blandest event of the day. Only eight horses are eligible to run in the 21st edition of the Juvenile, and what an oddball lot they are. Start with Twice Unbridled, a maiden from the San Luis Rey Downs training center in Bonsall, Calif.
SPORTS
October 22, 2004 | Bill Christine
Gary Stevens, the Hall of Fame jockey who has won eight Breeders' Cup races, said Thursday he wouldn't be riding in the Cup races at Lone Star Park on Oct. 30 because of insurance considerations. Stevens said that Lone Star officials, aware of his planned boycott of the Breeders' Cup, offered to provide $500,000 worth of accident insurance, but that wasn't enough to persuade him to ride.
SPORTS
October 21, 2004 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Pleasantly Perfect, who won the Breeders' Cup Classic last year as a longshot, was made the 3-1 favorite for this year's running by the Daily Racing Form after it was announced Wednesday that 13 horses were pre-entered. Being favored in the Classic has been an unenviable position, especially in recent years.
SPORTS
June 1, 2004 | Bob Mieszerski, Times Staff Writer
The best thing that happened to jockey Mike Smith on Monday was losing the mount on Azeri. While the former horse of the year was getting clobbered by males in the Metropolitan Handicap at Belmont Park, Smith directed Noches De Rosa to a one-length win over 3-5 favorite Megahertz in the $324,250 Gamely Breeders' Cup Handicap at Hollywood Park.
SPORTS
October 27, 2003 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Two most happy fellas happened to be dining at a French restaurant near Santa Anita on Saturday night. At one table was Sherwood Chillingworth, executive vice president of the Oak Tree Racing Assn., the host of Saturday's Breeders' Cup. Chillingworth was celebrating with family and friends the rousing day of racing at Santa Anita, where Oak Tree and Breeders' Cup betting records both fell.
SPORTS
October 26, 2003 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Funny Cide was an afterthought for trainer Barclay Tagg, who sent his Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner into Saturday's $4-million Breeders' Cup Classic off an 82-day layoff. A couple of jockeys in the Classic -- Pat Day aboard Ten Most Wanted and Gary Stevens riding Perfect Drift -- would have been better off if Funny Cide had stayed in New York.
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