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Brenda Levin

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NEWS
September 25, 1986 | LYNN SIMROSS, Times Staff Writer
For a person who didn't like Los Angeles one little bit when she got here 10 years ago, Brenda Levin has done an about-face. And because of her architectural input, the face of the city she used to dislike is changing, too. "I hated it for two years, especially from an architectural standpoint," she said of Los Angeles, after moving here from Boston in 1976. Armed With Stereotypes "I have to admit I came here believing all the Eastern stereotypes about the city.
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BUSINESS
August 2, 2009 | Roger Vincent
The gig: Founder and principal of Levin & Associates Architects, a Los Angeles firm that specializes in historic building renovations. Levin has been the architect responsible for restorations of such local landmarks as the Wiltern theater, Griffith Observatory and City Hall. Her latest challenge is the restoration and expansion of Wilshire Boulevard Temple, home to one of the city's oldest Jewish congregations and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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NEWS
June 10, 2001 | Susan Freudenheim, Times Staff Writer
How is it that the architect responsible for the historic restoration of a slew of Los Angeles' most important historic landmarks--the Bradbury building, the Wiltern Theatre, Grand Central Market and the late-1920s Oviatt and Fine Arts office buildings--is virtually unknown outside her field? How is it that this person has spent the last eight years restoring City Hall to its original 1928 splendor . . . and still escaped notice?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2003
As usual, Nicolai Ouroussoff seems to be focused only on the "black cape or starchitects" and does not recognize the importance of that large cadre of architects (female or male) who are quietly reshaping our cities and our lives with their work on less prominent projects ("New Perspective, New Aesthetic in a Room of Their Own," Aug. 10). Here in Southern California we are fortunate to have a large pool of great talent that is changing the architectural face of government, education and healthcare projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2003
As usual, Nicolai Ouroussoff seems to be focused only on the "black cape or starchitects" and does not recognize the importance of that large cadre of architects (female or male) who are quietly reshaping our cities and our lives with their work on less prominent projects ("New Perspective, New Aesthetic in a Room of Their Own," Aug. 10). Here in Southern California we are fortunate to have a large pool of great talent that is changing the architectural face of government, education and healthcare projects.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
When architect Myron Hunt died in 1952, he left behind a 50-year-old legacy of landmarks including the Pasadena Rose Bowl, the Ambassador Hotel, the Huntington Library and master plans for three local colleges. The work of the New England-born architect bore a reticence and honesty that, one historian says, made him appear as a puritan in the architectural Babylon of Southern California. Many of his elegant designs have recently been renovated.
NEWS
June 21, 2001
Thank you for Susan Freudenheim's insightful piece on architect Brenda Levin ("L.A.'s Designing Woman," June 10). As clients and members of Griffith Observatory's Renovation and Expansion Steering Committee, it is a great comfort to have her thoughtful counsel. Griffith Observatory is a Los Angeles icon, and all of us involved are committed to preserving its historic fabric. It is to Levin and her staff that we turn for guidance and sensitive solutions in every part of the historic structure.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2009 | Roger Vincent
The gig: Founder and principal of Levin & Associates Architects, a Los Angeles firm that specializes in historic building renovations. Levin has been the architect responsible for restorations of such local landmarks as the Wiltern theater, Griffith Observatory and City Hall. Her latest challenge is the restoration and expansion of Wilshire Boulevard Temple, home to one of the city's oldest Jewish congregations and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic
Architect Brenda Levin, a Los Angeles-based specialist in historic preservation and adaptive re-use of cultural facilities who recently transformed Griffith Observatory, has been selected as the design architect for the expansion and modernization of the Autry National Center in Griffith Park. The project will accommodate the vast collection of Native American artifacts compiled by the Southwest Museum, which merged with the Autry in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2006
I enjoyed the L.A. Times Calendar article ["The Stars Go Hollywood," Feb. 12], but am very concerned about future care of Griffith Observatory, its equipment and the actual site. When I reviewed the plans at the L.A. Cultural Heritage Commission meeting in 2000 with Dr. Edwin Krupp and architect Brenda Levin, there was no budget shown for equipment repair and conservation in their fancy presentation nor even for special maintenance of the new additions. My many years of experience in art and historic conservation engineering told me that could be trouble.
NEWS
June 21, 2001
Thank you for Susan Freudenheim's insightful piece on architect Brenda Levin ("L.A.'s Designing Woman," June 10). As clients and members of Griffith Observatory's Renovation and Expansion Steering Committee, it is a great comfort to have her thoughtful counsel. Griffith Observatory is a Los Angeles icon, and all of us involved are committed to preserving its historic fabric. It is to Levin and her staff that we turn for guidance and sensitive solutions in every part of the historic structure.
NEWS
June 10, 2001 | Susan Freudenheim, Times Staff Writer
How is it that the architect responsible for the historic restoration of a slew of Los Angeles' most important historic landmarks--the Bradbury building, the Wiltern Theatre, Grand Central Market and the late-1920s Oviatt and Fine Arts office buildings--is virtually unknown outside her field? How is it that this person has spent the last eight years restoring City Hall to its original 1928 splendor . . . and still escaped notice?
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
When architect Myron Hunt died in 1952, he left behind a 50-year-old legacy of landmarks including the Pasadena Rose Bowl, the Ambassador Hotel, the Huntington Library and master plans for three local colleges. The work of the New England-born architect bore a reticence and honesty that, one historian says, made him appear as a puritan in the architectural Babylon of Southern California. Many of his elegant designs have recently been renovated.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | LYNN SIMROSS, Times Staff Writer
For a person who didn't like Los Angeles one little bit when she got here 10 years ago, Brenda Levin has done an about-face. And because of her architectural input, the face of the city she used to dislike is changing, too. "I hated it for two years, especially from an architectural standpoint," she said of Los Angeles, after moving here from Boston in 1976. Armed With Stereotypes "I have to admit I came here believing all the Eastern stereotypes about the city.
REAL ESTATE
November 12, 1989
The Bradbury Building, Los Angeles' oldest historical landmark structure, is undergoing a multimillion-dollar renovation and restoration. According to new owner Sydney Irmas, who purchased the 96-year-old office/retail structure from Western Management last April, the rehab project will be completed by next summer. The project architect is Brenda Levin of Levin & Associates.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
Three business leaders who have played a role in efforts to revitalize downtown Los Angeles will be honored by Commercial Real Estate Women during the group's March 14 Renaissance Awards dinner.
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