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Brenda Spencer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A state parole board Tuesday rejected a bid for freedom by Brenda Spencer, who killed two adults and wounded eight children in a 1979 sniper attack on a San Diego elementary school. Spencer, 43, was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison in 1980; this was the third time her bid for parole had been rejected. The two-member parole board at the California Institution for Women in Chino ruled that she could not request parole again until 2009. Spencer was 16 when she fired 36 shots on Jan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - The gunman stalked the dormitory halls yelling "I'm going to kill somebody," pounding and kicking on doors, and firing his weapon in the air. The resident assistants remembered their training: turn off the lights, barricade the doors with chairs and tables, lie flat on the floor, push back if the killer tries to bust in, or jump out a window if it isn't too high. The drama was all staged but with a life-saving purpose Tuesday as a dormitory at San Diego State became a stand-in for Columbine High School, Virginia Tech, Sandy Hook Elementary and the engineering building on the campus here - all scenes of deadly rampages.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001 | From Associated Press
Brenda Spencer, who killed two people and wounded nine in the nation's first high-profile school shooting, was denied parole Tuesday after a hearing in which she said she feels responsible for the many school shootings since her 1979 sniper attack. Spencer, 38, told the three-member parole board at the California Institution for Women that she believes she is a different person now. "I know saying I'm sorry doesn't make it all right," she said, adding that she wished it had never happened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A state parole board Tuesday rejected a bid for freedom by Brenda Spencer, who killed two adults and wounded eight children in a 1979 sniper attack on a San Diego elementary school. Spencer, 43, was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison in 1980; this was the third time her bid for parole had been rejected. The two-member parole board at the California Institution for Women in Chino ruled that she could not request parole again until 2009. Spencer was 16 when she fired 36 shots on Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - The gunman stalked the dormitory halls yelling "I'm going to kill somebody," pounding and kicking on doors, and firing his weapon in the air. The resident assistants remembered their training: turn off the lights, barricade the doors with chairs and tables, lie flat on the floor, push back if the killer tries to bust in, or jump out a window if it isn't too high. The drama was all staged but with a life-saving purpose Tuesday as a dormitory at San Diego State became a stand-in for Columbine High School, Virginia Tech, Sandy Hook Elementary and the engineering building on the campus here - all scenes of deadly rampages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1998
The fact that Brenda Spencer, convicted of two counts of murder and sentenced to 25 years to life, is even eligible for parole after 18 years is a miscarriage of justice (Jan. 21). If the lawmakers who established the rules could get their math straight, it would go a long way to reestablish confidence in our justice system. RON LESOVSKY Huntington Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2005 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
A state parole board on Tuesday rejected a bid for freedom from Brenda Spencer, who killed two adults and wounded eight children in a 1979 sniper attack on a San Diego elementary school. Spencer, 43, was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison in 1980; this was the third time her bid for parole has been rejected. The two-member parole board at the California Institution for Women in Chino ruled that she could not request parole again until 2009.
NEWS
January 21, 1998 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She won worldwide notoriety in 1979 when, as a freckled 16-year-old proclaiming, "I don't like Mondays," Brenda Spencer sprayed a San Diego elementary school playground with .22-caliber semiautomatic sniper fire. Spencer's onslaught, as she crouched in her parents' home across the street, left the school's principal and janitor dead and eight children and a police officer wounded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2000 | Judy Silber, (714) 966-5988
The Canyon Hills Library will conduct a book club for adults that focuses on children's literature beginning Oct. 14 from 9:30 to 11 a.m. The book club will read and discuss old and new children's classics. Brenda Spencer and Andrea Guillaume of Cal State Fullerton's Department of Elementary, Bilingual and Reading Education will lead the discussions. The Canyon Hills Library is at 400 Scout Trail. Information: (714) 974-7630.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1985
A judge took under submission Wednesday a request to move out of the county the trial of a Spring Valley man charged with murdering two police officers. San Diego Superior Court Judge William Low did not say when he would issue a written ruling on the change of venue motion by attorneys for Joselito Cinco, 26. Cinco's trial is scheduled for Aug. 19. He is accused of murder in the Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2005 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
A state parole board on Tuesday rejected a bid for freedom from Brenda Spencer, who killed two adults and wounded eight children in a 1979 sniper attack on a San Diego elementary school. Spencer, 43, was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison in 1980; this was the third time her bid for parole has been rejected. The two-member parole board at the California Institution for Women in Chino ruled that she could not request parole again until 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001 | From Associated Press
Brenda Spencer, who killed two people and wounded nine in the nation's first high-profile school shooting, was denied parole Tuesday after a hearing in which she said she feels responsible for the many school shootings since her 1979 sniper attack. Spencer, 38, told the three-member parole board at the California Institution for Women that she believes she is a different person now. "I know saying I'm sorry doesn't make it all right," she said, adding that she wished it had never happened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1998
The fact that Brenda Spencer, convicted of two counts of murder and sentenced to 25 years to life, is even eligible for parole after 18 years is a miscarriage of justice (Jan. 21). If the lawmakers who established the rules could get their math straight, it would go a long way to reestablish confidence in our justice system. RON LESOVSKY Huntington Beach
NEWS
January 21, 1998 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She won worldwide notoriety in 1979 when, as a freckled 16-year-old proclaiming, "I don't like Mondays," Brenda Spencer sprayed a San Diego elementary school playground with .22-caliber semiautomatic sniper fire. Spencer's onslaught, as she crouched in her parents' home across the street, left the school's principal and janitor dead and eight children and a police officer wounded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1989 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
Christy Buell was "shocked, saddened, horrified" by the headlines. Tuesday, a killer walked onto a schoolyard in Stockton and opened fire on children, killing five and wounding 29 with bursts from a semiautomatic rifle. A teacher was also wounded in the assault, which lasted only three to four minutes. For Buell, the news was a grim reminder, an ugly blast of history repeating itself. She was one of eight children wounded Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1987
Law enforcement agencies across the country generally have not taken attacks on animals seriously in spite of growing evidence of a link between cruelty to animals and other forms of violent and antisocial behavior, says Randall Lockwood, a psychologist with the U.S. Humane Society. Lockwood, an expert on human-animal relationships, often talks to groups of police officers, encouraging them to look carefully at such cases to find perpetrators of crimes against humans.
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