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Brian Cox

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2006 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
IT'S Sunday evening at a pub in the borough of Camden, and an oblivious young man has just bumped into Brian Cox, jostling the actor's ginger beer and lightly splashing his cardigan sweater. If this minor collision had involved just about any of the characters Cox has assayed on-screen -- gangsters, cops, paramilitaries, cranks, killers, heavies almost to a man -- you can bet that the young offender would be in for a withering tongue-lashing at best, a plug through the heart at worst.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2011
UNDERRATED "Wonders of the Universe" with Brian Cox : Unlike other topic-specific networks like MTV and History Channel, the Science Channel is building a roster of quality shows true to its name. Examining the cosmos in a manner akin to the network's "Through the Wormhole," this engrossing documentary series gains a boost in the stylish Cox, a U.K. physicist who can break down the universe's vastness and inevitable demise with a genial serenity that borders on perverse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Scanned from top to bottom, the sublimely characterful face of Brian Cox begins around the eyebrows like Albert Finney's; continues downward, around the corners of his mouth, like Edward G. Robinson's; and ends up south of the mouth like Finney's again, especially when the chin's lowered and the eyes above it scan the room for a new target. The actor belonging to this particular mug was last seen locally two years ago, in the Mark Taper Forum production of "Skylight."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Physicist Brian Cox is the nerd who is cooler than you. In the parallel universe known as Britain, which occasionally intersects with ours, he is a media star, the figure of choice for explaining science to the people — a Carl Sagan with a Britpop haircut, a Lancashire accent and a permanent toothy smile. He's less well known here, though you may have seen the online TED video in which he describes his work at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland. (His "main research interest" there, he writes on his website, "is the FP420 R&D project, aimed at upgrading ATLAS and CMS with forward proton detectors 420m away from the interaction points."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1999 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar
Brian Cox is just making a point, but still, when he tells you that he doesn't like the way you're rolling that pen in your hands or the way you're eating, you tend to want to put your pen, as well as your fork, down. Maybe it's the way the actor burrows into you with his penetrating blue eyes, his craggy features taut with tension. Or the way his barrel-chested physique suddenly shifts, panther-like, in his seat. It's more than a little unsettling.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2001 | HUGH HART, Hugh Hart is a regular contributor to Calendar
In "L.I.E.," Brian Cox plays a pedophile. The 55-year-old Scottish actor has also portrayed a cannibal (Hannibal Lecter in the 1986 film "Manhunter") and a Nazi (Hermann Goering in TNT's 2000 cable miniseries "Nuremberg"). But a child molester? Even the most open-minded actor would surely pause before considering such a role. "I find the film difficult to watch," admits Cox, the father of two grown children. "It becomes very unsettling, but ultimately it's a very rewarding film."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Hannibal Is Back: Just in time for the May ratings sweeps, NBC has resurrected "Red Dragon: The Pursuit of Hannibal Lecter," the 1986 film that features the sinister character played by Anthony Hopkins in the current movie, "The Silence of the Lambs." It will air May 3, opposite the final episode of "Dallas" on CBS. The movie, which NBC previously broadcast in 1989, stars Brian Cox as the psychotic killer. William L. Peterson and Dennis Farina co-star.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2011
UNDERRATED "Wonders of the Universe" with Brian Cox : Unlike other topic-specific networks like MTV and History Channel, the Science Channel is building a roster of quality shows true to its name. Examining the cosmos in a manner akin to the network's "Through the Wormhole," this engrossing documentary series gains a boost in the stylish Cox, a U.K. physicist who can break down the universe's vastness and inevitable demise with a genial serenity that borders on perverse.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Physicist Brian Cox is the nerd who is cooler than you. In the parallel universe known as Britain, which occasionally intersects with ours, he is a media star, the figure of choice for explaining science to the people — a Carl Sagan with a Britpop haircut, a Lancashire accent and a permanent toothy smile. He's less well known here, though you may have seen the online TED video in which he describes his work at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland. (His "main research interest" there, he writes on his website, "is the FP420 R&D project, aimed at upgrading ATLAS and CMS with forward proton detectors 420m away from the interaction points."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There's a kind of wicked irony around every corner in "The Good Heart," where nothing and everything turns out exactly as it should in this story of second chances and the duck that got away. The film stars Brian Cox and Paul Dano as two mismatched souls who end up in the same hospital room, both having barely cheated death and only one happy about it. But instead of two ships passing in the night, circumstances conspire to toss them into the same lifeboat, metaphorically speaking, of course, since the story unfolds mostly in a New York City dive bar of the seediest sort.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There's a kind of wicked irony around every corner in "The Good Heart," where nothing and everything turns out exactly as it should in this story of second chances and the duck that got away. The film stars Brian Cox and Paul Dano as two mismatched souls who end up in the same hospital room, both having barely cheated death and only one happy about it. But instead of two ships passing in the night, circumstances conspire to toss them into the same lifeboat, metaphorically speaking, of course, since the story unfolds mostly in a New York City dive bar of the seediest sort.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2006 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
IT'S Sunday evening at a pub in the borough of Camden, and an oblivious young man has just bumped into Brian Cox, jostling the actor's ginger beer and lightly splashing his cardigan sweater. If this minor collision had involved just about any of the characters Cox has assayed on-screen -- gangsters, cops, paramilitaries, cranks, killers, heavies almost to a man -- you can bet that the young offender would be in for a withering tongue-lashing at best, a plug through the heart at worst.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2001 | HUGH HART, Hugh Hart is a regular contributor to Calendar
In "L.I.E.," Brian Cox plays a pedophile. The 55-year-old Scottish actor has also portrayed a cannibal (Hannibal Lecter in the 1986 film "Manhunter") and a Nazi (Hermann Goering in TNT's 2000 cable miniseries "Nuremberg"). But a child molester? Even the most open-minded actor would surely pause before considering such a role. "I find the film difficult to watch," admits Cox, the father of two grown children. "It becomes very unsettling, but ultimately it's a very rewarding film."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Scanned from top to bottom, the sublimely characterful face of Brian Cox begins around the eyebrows like Albert Finney's; continues downward, around the corners of his mouth, like Edward G. Robinson's; and ends up south of the mouth like Finney's again, especially when the chin's lowered and the eyes above it scan the room for a new target. The actor belonging to this particular mug was last seen locally two years ago, in the Mark Taper Forum production of "Skylight."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1999 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is a regular contributor to Calendar
Brian Cox is just making a point, but still, when he tells you that he doesn't like the way you're rolling that pen in your hands or the way you're eating, you tend to want to put your pen, as well as your fork, down. Maybe it's the way the actor burrows into you with his penetrating blue eyes, his craggy features taut with tension. Or the way his barrel-chested physique suddenly shifts, panther-like, in his seat. It's more than a little unsettling.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Hannibal Is Back: Just in time for the May ratings sweeps, NBC has resurrected "Red Dragon: The Pursuit of Hannibal Lecter," the 1986 film that features the sinister character played by Anthony Hopkins in the current movie, "The Silence of the Lambs." It will air May 3, opposite the final episode of "Dallas" on CBS. The movie, which NBC previously broadcast in 1989, stars Brian Cox as the psychotic killer. William L. Peterson and Dennis Farina co-star.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Rise of the Planet of the Apes" does it right. Smart, fun and thoroughly enjoyable, it's a model summer diversion that entertains without insulting your intelligence. Adroitly blending the most modern technology with age-old story elements, it's also an origin story that answers the question that's been hanging in the air since 1968: How did it happen that apes rule? That year's Charlton Heston-starring "Planet of the Apes" (based on a novel by Pierre Boulle) posited a world where simians were in charge and people were in cages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1985
Podhoretz would have us believe that risking the lives of innocent hijack victims would somehow salvage our national honor. I don't believe the deaths of thousands of young men in Vietnam did much to embolden our national honor (read ego?). There are also Muslims who believe that commiting suicide by blowing up themselves and taking their enemies with them gives them a free ticket into heaven. BRIAN COX North Hollywood
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