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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
The bulk of the attention surrounding this year's class of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame zeroes in on the musicians: KISS, Nirvana, Linda Ronstadt, Peter Gabriel, Yusuf/Cat Stevens, Hall & Oates and Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band. Plus whatever chatter has been sparked by KISS' decision not to perform because of bruised feelings over which band members are being inducted, fans grousing that original Nirvana member Chad Channing isn't being included, Ronstadt's public comments about her general lack of interest in the proceedings, etc. What hasn't generated 1% of that kind of attention is the culmination of a 15-year campaign that has resulted in Beatles manager Brian Epstein being inducted as a recipient of the Ahmet Ertegun Lifetime Achievement Award.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
BROOKLYN, N.Y. - The man formerly known as Cat Stevens quietly walked on stage at the Barclays Center arena to be honored at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 2014 induction ceremony. Now known as Yusuf, the singer-songwriter of 1970s folk-rock hits such as "Wild World" and "Moonshadow" converted to Islam and turned his back on pop music stardom at the end of the decade. Thursday during the ceremony, Yusuf re-entered that fray after being introduced by Art Garfunkel. PHOTOS: Rock Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony 2014 The 65-year-old, dressed in a crisp gray suit over a yellow T-shirt, drew surprised laughs from the crowd when he thanked Rock Hall voters for electing "someone who doesn't drink, doesn't do drugs, doesn't throw television sets out of hotel rooms and only sleeps with his wife....
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new film "The Hours and Times" is garnering a lot of attention no doubt because it speculates upon a few days in the life of endlessly speculated-upon rock hero John Lennon. But for writer-director Christopher Munch, the film is really about its other lead character--Brian Epstein, the not-quite-so-famed manager of the Beatles. "I think I had more of an emotional connection to Epstein," said Munch, stopping in at his Hollywood apartment last week between film festival jaunts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
The bulk of the attention surrounding this year's class of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame zeroes in on the musicians: KISS, Nirvana, Linda Ronstadt, Peter Gabriel, Yusuf/Cat Stevens, Hall & Oates and Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band. Plus whatever chatter has been sparked by KISS' decision not to perform because of bruised feelings over which band members are being inducted, fans grousing that original Nirvana member Chad Channing isn't being included, Ronstadt's public comments about her general lack of interest in the proceedings, etc. What hasn't generated 1% of that kind of attention is the culmination of a 15-year campaign that has resulted in Beatles manager Brian Epstein being inducted as a recipient of the Ahmet Ertegun Lifetime Achievement Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Former Rolling Stones manager and producer Andrew Loog Oldham, in response to a request for comment from The Times, has elaborated on the reasons for his decision to skip his own induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame this week. Oldham tells Pop & Hiss that the decision reflects “an equal measure of both” his feelings about how the institution has changed over the years and how his induction has been handled this year. As outlined in a previous Pop &; Hiss post , Oldham, who produced the Stones'  albums and  singles from 1963 to 1967, remarked recently that he objects to the way the ceremony has changed since cameras were allowed to record highlights for subsequent airing as cable TV specials.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Andrew Loog Oldham, the Rolling Stones' early manager, producer and publicist who is being inducted this year into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, has announced that he will skip the ceremony. “I think those people basically hijacked the name 'rock 'n' roll,'” Oldham told an audience during a talk in March at the Berlin School of Creative Leadership.  “I won't be there.  I'll tell you why.... It's a television show.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Only an hour in length and made with the most slender of resources, "The Hours and Times" (at the Nuart for one week) shows how much can be done with very little. A spare but highly polished examination of a weekend John Lennon and Beatles' manager Brian Epstein spent together in Barcelona in the spring of 1963, it manages an impressive display of both psychological reality and filmmaking sensibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Only an hour in length and made with the most slender of resources, "The Hours and Times" (at the Ken for a week starting Sunday) shows how much can be done with very little. A spare but highly polished examination of a weekend John Lennon and Beatles' manager Brian Epstein spent together in Barcelona in the spring of 1963, it manages an impressive display of both psychological reality and filmmaking sensibility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2013 | By David Colker, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Singer Jackie Lomax will perhaps be most remembered for what didn't happen during his long career. Despite several brushes with fame - and solo recordings featuring no less than Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton and Levon Helm backing him - Lomax never became a star. He never had anything close to a hit album, despite admiration for his wide-ranging, bluesy vocals. Harrison even wrote a song for him, "Sour Milk Sea," that was released as a single, and that went nowhere too. But Lomax, who played numerous concerts in the Ojai area where he'd lived in recent years, seemed to take it in stride.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Former Rolling Stones manager and producer Andrew Loog Oldham, in response to a request for comment from The Times, has elaborated on the reasons for his decision to skip his own induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame this week. Oldham tells Pop & Hiss that the decision reflects “an equal measure of both” his feelings about how the institution has changed over the years and how his induction has been handled this year. As outlined in a previous Pop &; Hiss post , Oldham, who produced the Stones'  albums and  singles from 1963 to 1967, remarked recently that he objects to the way the ceremony has changed since cameras were allowed to record highlights for subsequent airing as cable TV specials.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Andrew Loog Oldham, the Rolling Stones' early manager, producer and publicist who is being inducted this year into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, has announced that he will skip the ceremony. “I think those people basically hijacked the name 'rock 'n' roll,'” Oldham told an audience during a talk in March at the Berlin School of Creative Leadership.  “I won't be there.  I'll tell you why.... It's a television show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2013 | By David Colker, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Singer Jackie Lomax will perhaps be most remembered for what didn't happen during his long career. Despite several brushes with fame - and solo recordings featuring no less than Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton and Levon Helm backing him - Lomax never became a star. He never had anything close to a hit album, despite admiration for his wide-ranging, bluesy vocals. Harrison even wrote a song for him, "Sour Milk Sea," that was released as a single, and that went nowhere too. But Lomax, who played numerous concerts in the Ojai area where he'd lived in recent years, seemed to take it in stride.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Only an hour in length and made with the most slender of resources, "The Hours and Times" (at the Ken for a week starting Sunday) shows how much can be done with very little. A spare but highly polished examination of a weekend John Lennon and Beatles' manager Brian Epstein spent together in Barcelona in the spring of 1963, it manages an impressive display of both psychological reality and filmmaking sensibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new film "The Hours and Times" is garnering a lot of attention no doubt because it speculates upon a few days in the life of endlessly speculated-upon rock hero John Lennon. But for writer-director Christopher Munch, the film is really about its other lead character--Brian Epstein, the not-quite-so-famed manager of the Beatles. "I think I had more of an emotional connection to Epstein," said Munch, stopping in at his Hollywood apartment last week between film festival jaunts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Only an hour in length and made with the most slender of resources, "The Hours and Times" (at the Nuart for one week) shows how much can be done with very little. A spare but highly polished examination of a weekend John Lennon and Beatles' manager Brian Epstein spent together in Barcelona in the spring of 1963, it manages an impressive display of both psychological reality and filmmaking sensibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
BROOKLYN, N.Y. - The man formerly known as Cat Stevens quietly walked on stage at the Barclays Center arena to be honored at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 2014 induction ceremony. Now known as Yusuf, the singer-songwriter of 1970s folk-rock hits such as "Wild World" and "Moonshadow" converted to Islam and turned his back on pop music stardom at the end of the decade. Thursday during the ceremony, Yusuf re-entered that fray after being introduced by Art Garfunkel. PHOTOS: Rock Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony 2014 The 65-year-old, dressed in a crisp gray suit over a yellow T-shirt, drew surprised laughs from the crowd when he thanked Rock Hall voters for electing "someone who doesn't drink, doesn't do drugs, doesn't throw television sets out of hotel rooms and only sleeps with his wife....
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The street date of Scotty Bowers' "Full Service: My Adventures in Hollywood and the Secret Sex Lives of the Stars," written with Lionel Friedberg, is Valentine's Day, but the eagerly anticipated memoir has been generating buzz for several weeks, and will most likely encounter a firestorm of criticism from some segments of the Hollywood set. It offers the former Marine paratrooper, pump jockey and bartender's accounts of three decades of having...
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