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Brian Gorman

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SPORTS
March 11, 1995 | JOHN LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every time National League umpire Brian Gorman brushes off home plate, he evokes the memory of his famous father. Call it a silent invocation, a ritual within a ritual. As he wipes the plate clean before each half-inning--a baseball rite as much a part of the game as the seventh-inning stretch and, well, booing the ump--Gorman clutches in his fingers a tiny wood-handled brush given to him by his father, Tom. The brush is well-kept but its needles are beginning to abrade.
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SPORTS
May 3, 1995 | JOHN LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National League umpire Brian Gorman has a simple message for the replacement umpires whose brief big-league careers ended Tuesday night: Thank you. Now get lost. Baseball owners Monday ended their 120-day lockout of the umpires, who return to work today after ratifying a five-year contract that includes salary increases and improved benefits. The salary scale will range from $75,000 to $225,000, up from $60,000 to $175,000.
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SPORTS
March 11, 1995 | JOHN LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although he has little sympathy for baseball owners, National League umpire Brian Gorman will cross picket lines--real or imagined--to work games with replacement players if it comes to that this spring. Gorman and his fellow umpires also are locked in a labor battle with baseball, though the umpires' negotiations have been overshadowed by the players' strike that has shut down baseball since Aug. 12.
SPORTS
March 11, 1995 | JOHN LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although he has little sympathy for baseball owners, National League umpire Brian Gorman will cross picket lines--real or imagined--to work games with replacement players if it comes to that this spring. Gorman and his fellow umpires also are locked in a labor battle with baseball, though the umpires' negotiations have been overshadowed by the players' strike that has shut down baseball since Aug. 12.
SPORTS
May 3, 1995 | JOHN LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National League umpire Brian Gorman has a simple message for the replacement umpires whose brief big-league careers ended Tuesday night: Thank you. Now get lost. Baseball owners Monday ended their 120-day lockout of the umpires, who return to work today after ratifying a five-year contract that includes salary increases and improved benefits. The salary scale will range from $75,000 to $225,000, up from $60,000 to $175,000.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal authorities have confirmed the deaths of six harbor porpoises whose bodies were found after a Navy vessel tested midrange sonar in Haro Strait last week. Three of the carcasses beached in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, just west of Haro, and three in the San Juan Islands to the south, said spokesman Brian Gorman of the National Marine Fisheries Service. Activists have reported nine porpoise strandings in the last week.
NEWS
August 14, 1987
The discovery of two dead dolphins in Virginia Beach, Va., may give scientists significant data for their investigation into the deaths of 150 or more dolphins along the mid-Atlantic coast, a research team spokesman said. One of the dolphins had been dead probably less than 45 minutes, spokesman Brian Gorman said. Tissue from other dead dolphins has been studied, but the animals were too decomposed to provide much data.
NEWS
August 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
Federal officials have closed Georges Bank to fishing for surf clams, the tough bivalves used in stews and chowders, for 90 days because of red tide. It apparently was the first time in the roughly five years that surf clams have been extensively fished there that the bank 100 miles east of Cape Cod was closed because of red tide, said Brian Gorman of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Marine biologists plan to capture sick dolphins in hopes of learning what is causing the mysterious deaths of the mammals along the mid-Atlantic coast, scientists in Virginia Beach said last week. "We are anticipating within the next week that we will capture some live animals," said Brian Gorman, spokesman for the National Marine Fisheries Service. He said personnel and equipment from Sea World in Orlando, Fla., arrived in Norfolk last week.
NEWS
April 21, 2002 | From Associated Press
Irrigation district officials say they will defy a court order intended to protect endangered Chinook salmon and steelhead and begin sending water to their members' fields next month. The Methow Valley Irrigation District in north-central Washington state was ordered by a federal judge to improve the efficiency of its irrigation system by April 1 or go without water. Federal attorneys asked U.S. District Judge Fred Van Sickle on Thursday to carry out that order.
SPORTS
March 11, 1995 | JOHN LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every time National League umpire Brian Gorman brushes off home plate, he evokes the memory of his famous father. Call it a silent invocation, a ritual within a ritual. As he wipes the plate clean before each half-inning--a baseball rite as much a part of the game as the seventh-inning stretch and, well, booing the ump--Gorman clutches in his fingers a tiny wood-handled brush given to him by his father, Tom. The brush is well-kept but its needles are beginning to abrade.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Up to half the population of East Coast bottlenose dolphins died from eating fish tainted by a toxin that occurs naturally in "red tide" algae, federal scientists reported Wednesday. Dolphins numbering perhaps in the thousands died during 1987 and 1988 after eating menhaden and Spanish mackerel that were contaminated with a powerful poison, called brevertoxin, from a rare bloom of red tide algae, said Joseph Geraci, a wildlife specialist who headed a team of researchers.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Federal agents arrested the alleged kingpin of a fish-smuggling ring and detained the captains of two Taiwanese fishing vessels in the North Pacific as part of a sting operation involving the sale of $1.3-million worth of salmon. Brian Gorman, a spokesman for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said today that a U.S.
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