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BUSINESS
July 14, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Longshoremen Oust Incumbent President: David Arian of San Pedro lost his bid for a second three-year term as president of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union. Vice President Brian McWilliams defeated Arian by a vote of 7,453 to 5,962, according to results released by the San Francisco-based union. McWilliams, of Petaluma, Calif., will become the fourth president to head the union, which represents 45,000 workers in Hawaii and Alaska and on the U.S. and Canadian West
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BUSINESS
July 14, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Longshoremen Oust Incumbent President: David Arian of San Pedro lost his bid for a second three-year term as president of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union. Vice President Brian McWilliams defeated Arian by a vote of 7,453 to 5,962, according to results released by the San Francisco-based union. McWilliams, of Petaluma, Calif., will become the fourth president to head the union, which represents 45,000 workers in Hawaii and Alaska and on the U.S. and Canadian West
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999
The International Longshore and Warehouse Union will halt work here and in all West Coast ports today in support of Mumia Abu-Jamal, a death row inmate whose murder conviction in the slaying of a Philadelphia police officer in 1981 has gained international attention. The action is part of a national day of protest on behalf of Abu-Jamal, whose 17-year effort to win a new trial has become a cause among celebrities, writers, educators and human rights activists in the United States and Europe.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2002 | From Associated Press
Even Saddam Hussein gets spam. He also gets e-mail purporting to be from U.S. companies offering business deals, and threats, according to a journalist who figured out a way into an Iraqi government e-mail account and downloaded more than 1,000 messages. Brian McWilliams, a freelancer who specializes in Internet security, says he hardly needed high-level hacking skills to snoop through e-mail addressed to Hussein.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran dockworker and labor official from Los Angeles was elected Friday to head the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, among the nation's most powerful labor organizations and one that is facing a range of difficult technological issues on the West Coast. James Spinosa, 59, defeated incumbent Brian McWilliams for president of the San Francisco-based union, which has about 60,000 members in Alaska, California, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii and Canada.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2004 | From Associated Press
Federal prosecutors and a former America Online Inc. software engineer have negotiated a tentative plea agreement over charges he stole more than 92 million e-mail addresses and sold them to Internet spammers, according to two people familiar with the case. Jason Smathers, 24, of Harpers Ferry, W.Va., is scheduled to appear today in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by more than 135 illegal union actions that have repeatedly idled West Coast ports since 1996, a powerful organization of shipping companies is seeking a court order to prevent dock workers from violating contract provisions designed to prohibit strikes and work slowdowns. The Pacific Maritime Assn.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Longshore workers and shipping companies agreed to a new labor contract late Thursday, clearing the way for the resumption of normal cargo operations at West Coast ports that have been plagued by work stoppages and slowdowns for the last 10 days. After almost two months of bargaining in San Francisco, the powerful International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Assn.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON and EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sweatshops. Child labor. Jobs fleeing to Mexico. Organized labor, long stymied in its bid to use trade policy as a tool for its agenda, has persuaded the White House to take up its cause when trade ministers from around the world convene in Seattle on Nov. 30. But last week, negotiators got a foreshadowing of what to expect as dozens of developing nations demanded that labor standards be put off-limits at the landmark meeting of the World Trade Organization.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After three years of labor tension and court battles, shipping companies and the powerful dockworkers union this week will begin contract negotiations over basic working conditions and further modernization of America's West Coast ports, including Los Angeles and Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1999 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They combine the role of boss and worker, administrator and laborer. Together, the three longshoremen who form a majority on the Port of Hueneme's harbor commission are unique: At none of the other 108 ports in 28 states and five U.S. territories do the laborers who work the docks also run the port. "It's the only one now," said Rex Sherman, chief researcher at the American Assn. of Port Authorities in Virginia. "And I think that it may be the first ever."
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