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Brian Moynihan

BUSINESS
October 18, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Bank of America Corp. eked out a $340-million profit for the third quarter after recording $1.6 billion in legal expenses, but analysts say the bank has much more work ahead before it can resolve the headaches that have plagued it since the financial crisis. The latest litigation costs, disclosed in a third-quarter financial report, stem from a $2.4-billion settlement of lawsuits over BofA's takeover of brokerage giant Merrill Lynch in 2008. The settlement, announced Sept. 28, was with investors who contended BofA knew Merrill was in worse financial shape than it revealed at the time.
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BUSINESS
August 25, 2011 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Warren Buffett is known on Wall Street for his Midas touch, and nobody is more thankful for that these days than Bank of America Corp. Berkshire Hathaway Inc., Buffett's investment company, agreed Thursday to sink $5 billion into the beleaguered financial giant. The deal helped allay fears that America's biggest bank needs a fresh infusion of capital to withstand mortgage losses and another downturn in the economy. The investment casts the Oracle of Omaha in a familiar and favorable light, tossing a lifeline to an American icon in need.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2010 | By Nathaniel Popper
Since Brian Moynihan took over as chief executive at Bank of America Corp. at the turn of the year, he has sought to convey a flexible and cooperative attitude. But the accommodating approach hasn't been extended to shareholders seeking to put proposals regarding executive pay on the ballot at the company's April 28 annual meeting. The bank is "being aggressive in doing whatever they can do to keep shareholders off the ballot," said John Chevedden of Redondo Beach, a retired aerospace worker who has proposed a number of shareholder resolutions at banks.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
In a year when Bank of America Corp.'s stock plunged 58% and the company announced plans to lay off 30,000 employees, Chief Executive Brian Moynihan's compensation package more than quadrupled to nearly $8.1 million. Here's why: In 2011, the Charlotte, N.C., bank recorded $1.4 billion in profit after losing $2.2 billion the year before. So although the bank's compensation and benefits committee kept Moynihan's salary the same at $950,000, he landed $6.1 million in performance-reliant stock.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2009 | By E. Scott Reckard
Ending a tangled succession process, Bank of America Corp. named its retail banking chief, Brian Moynihan, on Wednesday to be its new chief executive. He will assume the CEO post Jan. 1, succeeding Kenneth D. Lewis, who came under fire for his decision last year to acquire weakened Wall Street giant Merrill Lynch & Co. in a deal that required the bank to accept one of the largest infusions of federal bailout funds. Moynihan, 50, was elected unanimously by the board of the Charlotte, N.C., company after directors spent months considering other internal candidates, notably Chief Risk Officer Gregory L. Curl, as well as star bankers from other institutions.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2011 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Bank of America Corp. Chief Executive Brian Moynihan shuffled his management team, ousting two top executives as the embattled banking giant faces a plummeting stock price and mounting legal woes. Moynihan on Tuesday announced the departure of Sallie Krawcheck, the bank's head of global wealth and investment management, and Joe Price, president of consumer and small-business banking. Both were top lieutenants to former CEO Kenneth Lewis, who resigned in October 2009. Krawcheck, one of the most powerful women on Wall Street and a former top executive at Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. and Citigroup Inc., was hired by Lewis in 2009, toward the end of his tenure at Bank of America.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2011 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Bank of America Corp.'s chief executive is out to convince Wall Street that he's finally bringing under control the financial disaster caused by the bank's acquisition of mortgage goliath Countrywide Financial Corp. Brian Moynihan, who took the helm at the nation's biggest bank in late 2009, has had the unrelenting task of cleaning up an institution in such financial disrepair that the bank needed $45 billion in federal bailouts to stay in business. The Charlotte, N.C., bank posted an $8.8-billion second-quarter loss Tuesday as it continued to deal with the aftermath of the housing bust.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Millions of Californians remain stuck in the state's increasingly expensive rental markets, unable to buy homes as they deal with tight credit markets and damage to their finances from the Great Recession. Sounds like a mess fit for two of the nation's most prominent turnaround specialists - California Gov. Jerry Brown, fresh off his state budget-balancing act, and Bank of America Corp. Chief Executive Brian Moynihan, still engaged in resurrecting that institution from the mortgage meltdown.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2011 | E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Bank of America Corp. is telling investors that the first stage of its cost-cutting plan would save $5 billion a year and eliminate 30,000 jobs, with more reductions to come in a second phase of streamlining. But as Chief Executive Brian Moynihan fielded questions at a conference Monday, some investors were wondering whether more drastic actions might be in order. One asked about the possibility of a bankruptcy filing for Countrywide Financial Corp., the high-risk home lender whose acquisition has gravely wounded the Charlotte, N.C., bank.
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