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Bribery South Korea

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NEWS
May 24, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did he or didn't he? With the arrest of South Korean President Kim Young Sam's son last week on charges of taking millions in bribes in exchange for business favors, public attention has shifted to a potentially more explosive issue: whether the president knew about--or directly provided--the $13.6-million political slush fund prosecutors say the younger Kim controlled.
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NEWS
May 31, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sidestepping allegations of dirty money politics that have tarnished his presidency, South Korean President Kim Young Sam on Friday vowed to push through stiff campaign finance reforms before his term ends in December.
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NEWS
May 31, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sidestepping allegations of dirty money politics that have tarnished his presidency, South Korean President Kim Young Sam on Friday vowed to push through stiff campaign finance reforms before his term ends in December.
NEWS
May 24, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did he or didn't he? With the arrest of South Korean President Kim Young Sam's son last week on charges of taking millions in bribes in exchange for business favors, public attention has shifted to a potentially more explosive issue: whether the president knew about--or directly provided--the $13.6-million political slush fund prosecutors say the younger Kim controlled.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | From Associated Press
President Kim Young Sam's son was arrested on bribery and tax evasion charges Saturday, humiliating his father, who had made fighting corruption a theme of his presidency. Kim was quick to apologize for his son's alleged wrongdoing and urged the nation to put the scandal behind it so as to focus on other national problems, such as an economic slump and relations with rival North Korea. But this is an election year, and opposition parties vowed to uncover more corruption in the government.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean prosecutors today announced the indictment of 10 people--but no high-ranking political figures--in a bribery investigation that has been widely denounced here as a whitewash. President Kim Young Sam's son Kim Hyon Chol, a major target of allegations, was not expected to be questioned as a suspect in connection with the investigation of the Hanbo Group. The conglomerate, Korea's 14th largest, received more than $5.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Prosecutors investigating a bribery scandal arrested the Ministry of Finance and Economy's director general, Han Taek Soo, two days after the arrest of the chief stock market watchdog, Paik Won Ku, on suspicion of taking $140,000 in bribes. Prosecutors accused Han, 46, who headed treasury operations at the ministry, of accepting a bribe of $64,100 from Korea Data Systems Co. in return for helping the company list on the Seoul stock exchange.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
South Korea's slush fund scandal, with its indictments of seven top business tycoons, brings a short-term blow to the country's economy--but may carry long-term benefits. The disclosure that former President Roh Tae Woo accumulated a $653-million slush fund through bribes and political donations offers an opportunity to break down the collusive nature of business-government ties, many in Seoul say. That could build a stronger base for future growth.
NEWS
December 2, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Young Sam has given up golf and limited his lunches to noodles and other humble fare. He has disavowed political donations from business in a personal example that South Koreans should live clean and simple lives. Since his 1993 inauguration, Kim has pushed through a host of clean-government laws and targeted more than 1,100 officials--including two former presidents--in the biggest, broadest attack on corruption ever attempted here.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Korean chaebol , or conglomerates, are so huge that the 30 biggest ones produce total sales equivalent to three-quarters of South Korea's gross national product. The business groups are so clannish that the founders or their families hold more than three-quarters of all chaebol positions of managing director and above.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | From Associated Press
President Kim Young Sam's son was arrested on bribery and tax evasion charges Saturday, humiliating his father, who had made fighting corruption a theme of his presidency. Kim was quick to apologize for his son's alleged wrongdoing and urged the nation to put the scandal behind it so as to focus on other national problems, such as an economic slump and relations with rival North Korea. But this is an election year, and opposition parties vowed to uncover more corruption in the government.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean prosecutors today announced the indictment of 10 people--but no high-ranking political figures--in a bribery investigation that has been widely denounced here as a whitewash. President Kim Young Sam's son Kim Hyon Chol, a major target of allegations, was not expected to be questioned as a suspect in connection with the investigation of the Hanbo Group. The conglomerate, Korea's 14th largest, received more than $5.
NEWS
December 2, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Kim Young Sam has given up golf and limited his lunches to noodles and other humble fare. He has disavowed political donations from business in a personal example that South Koreans should live clean and simple lives. Since his 1993 inauguration, Kim has pushed through a host of clean-government laws and targeted more than 1,100 officials--including two former presidents--in the biggest, broadest attack on corruption ever attempted here.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Prosecutors investigating a bribery scandal arrested the Ministry of Finance and Economy's director general, Han Taek Soo, two days after the arrest of the chief stock market watchdog, Paik Won Ku, on suspicion of taking $140,000 in bribes. Prosecutors accused Han, 46, who headed treasury operations at the ministry, of accepting a bribe of $64,100 from Korea Data Systems Co. in return for helping the company list on the Seoul stock exchange.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Korean chaebol , or conglomerates, are so huge that the 30 biggest ones produce total sales equivalent to three-quarters of South Korea's gross national product. The business groups are so clannish that the founders or their families hold more than three-quarters of all chaebol positions of managing director and above.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Major South Korean conglomerates hit by indictments of their chairmen, who are suspected of bribing former President Roh Tae Woo, quickly vowed Tuesday to change their domestic business practices. But prosecutors made it clear they will do nothing to impede the rapid expansion of South Korea's industrial empires overseas, where their growth has become increasingly important to the domestic economy.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1994 | From Bloomberg Business News
Daewoo Group Chairman Kim Woo Choong and two other South Korean industrialists were indicted over the weekend on bribery charges, prosecutors said. The others are Dong-A Construction Group Chairman Choi Won Suk and Samsung Engineering & Construction Chairman Park Ki Suk. They weren't detained physically. Prosecutors said Chung Hun Mok, former chairman of Hyundai Engineering & Construction, will be investigated on the same charge when he returns from his stay in the United States.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Major South Korean conglomerates hit by indictments of their chairmen, who are suspected of bribing former President Roh Tae Woo, quickly vowed Tuesday to change their domestic business practices. But prosecutors made it clear they will do nothing to impede the rapid expansion of South Korea's industrial empires overseas, where their growth has become increasingly important to the domestic economy.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
South Korea's slush fund scandal, with its indictments of seven top business tycoons, brings a short-term blow to the country's economy--but may carry long-term benefits. The disclosure that former President Roh Tae Woo accumulated a $653-million slush fund through bribes and political donations offers an opportunity to break down the collusive nature of business-government ties, many in Seoul say. That could build a stronger base for future growth.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1994 | From Bloomberg Business News
Daewoo Group Chairman Kim Woo Choong and two other South Korean industrialists were indicted over the weekend on bribery charges, prosecutors said. The others are Dong-A Construction Group Chairman Choi Won Suk and Samsung Engineering & Construction Chairman Park Ki Suk. They weren't detained physically. Prosecutors said Chung Hun Mok, former chairman of Hyundai Engineering & Construction, will be investigated on the same charge when he returns from his stay in the United States.
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