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Brick

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Los Angeles' chief surveyor stood above the newly unearthed brick and mortar pipe and carefully opened a 127-year-old leather book. "Here is the pipe. It's exactly where they said it was in 1887," said Tony Pratt, carefully pointing to a hand-drawn map in the ancient field guide. Freddie Eaton was the chief surveyor back then, the field guide noted. Eaton would eventually go on to become the city's mayor and a prominent figure in the expansion of L.A. Pratt pulled the old city surveyor's field report from city archives this week after reading a news account about the discovery of a remnant of the original Zanja Madre - the town's original water network - beneath a Chinatown construction site.
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BUSINESS
March 1, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
A Bel-Air house that was home to a young Judy Garland, in the days of her star turn as Dorothy in the 1939 classic "The Wizard of Oz," is back on the market at $7.1 million, roughly a year after its previous sale. Updated and renovated, the two-story traditional sits on about 2.5 acres. Designed by Wallace Neff and built in 1938, the house features dormer and bay windows, white columns, a red-brick clad veranda and French doors. The 5,500-plus-square-foot house has five bedrooms, five full bathrooms and two half-baths.
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | EMILY ADAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Early morning light streamed down from a skylight two floors up, illuminating huge canvases, paint tubes and a calico cat lounging on the stairs. This would be a peaceful scene in artist Amy Ellingson's Long Beach loft, but for a dozen city planners standing in her dining room to admire what architect and developer Carl Day had wrought. Here in an old brick building, former home of the Royal Windjammer cocktail lounge just northwest of downtown, are 11 bright artists' lofts.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2011 | By Catherine Ho
If a view could say, "You've arrived," it would be the one from this house. The newly completed home on Beverly Hills' Angelo Drive looks out on downtown Los Angeles, Century City, Beverly Hills, the Los Angeles Country Club and, on a clear day, even to the ocean. From afar, the house resembles a stylized box, enclosed by sliding glass doors and frameless windows. Up close, it's elegant lines and attention to detail. Floors are polished concrete, honeycombed to control heat and cold.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1993
The juries have spoken and what they have said to law enforcement is: "Do your job, go to jail. Use a brick, it's a misdemeanor." JOHN J. VALENCIA San Dimas
BUSINESS
July 24, 2011 | By Scott Marshutz
Eileen and Carlton Appleby opened their Escondido home to a group of architects and designers in 1984 as a place to judge entries for the city's Civic Center design competition. One of the judges, Michael John Pittas, who at the time was dean of the then-Otis Art Institute's Parsons School of Design, was no less than awed. "One rarely finds the quality of craftsmanship, detail and drama in a contemporary home," he wrote in a thank-you letter. Five years earlier, newspaper publisher Carlton Appleby had tapped Norm Applebaum to design the residence in the Eden Valley subdivision where the Applebys had purchased more than 400 wild acres.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER
Two Venice groups are promoting a plan to resurface the community's boardwalk in brick, but critics say it would be too costly and anathema to the boardwalk's funky ambience. At stake is about $10 million in funding earmarked for Venice Beach from Proposition A, a $500-million ballot measure for improving parks and recreation facilities. The closed Venice Pier will be restored with $3 million of the allotted funds, leaving $7 million for refurbishment of the boardwalk.
NEWS
October 31, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 1020 Skyline Drive on Saturday, it was time for a "sifting party." Paper masks over their mouths, gloves on their hands and sieves, shovels and strainers tucked under their arms, about a dozen friends gathered to help Charlie Franciscus, one of about 350 Laguna Beach residents who lost their homes in the fire, find whatever she could. "I found my diamond earrings that my husband gave me and my diamond necklace!" Franciscus reported to new arrivals. "You can just barely see them."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2001
Many migrants who attempt to cross the U.S.-Mexican border into Southern California never make it. Inadequately dressed and without enough food and water, they fall prey to extreme weather, rugged terrain and other dangers. Their deaths often go unnoticed. Their bodies are placed in a dirt plot in the back of a cemetery. Only a brick with the words "John Doe" marks each grave. In the Imperial County border town of Holtville, 150 unidentified immigrants are buried.
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