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Bridge Collapses

WORLD
August 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A bridge under construction in the southern Chinese town of Fenghuang collapsed after scaffolding was removed, killing at least 34 people, injuring 22 and rekindling concern about rushed, shoddy building amid China's torrid economic expansion. About 30 people were missing. Witnesses said they heard a rumble Monday afternoon and saw stones fall from the 140-foot-high, 880-foot-long vehicle and pedestrian bridge across the Tuo River.
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NEWS
October 29, 1999 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caltrans permit writers routed at least six overweight trucks over a temporary bridge near Lompoc that collapsed last week, unaware that the road had weight restrictions or that a temporary structure was even in place, sources in the agency said Thursday. The two-lane bridge on California 246 had been open for two weeks when it collapsed Oct. 21, just seconds after a legally permitted truck weighing more than twice the bridge's capacity drove across.
NEWS
May 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Winston stock car race was winding down and fans were streaming across a pedestrian bridge over a four-lane highway when two loud cracks could be heard above the murmur of the crowd. With the second crack, an 80-foot section of the 320-foot concrete-and-steel walkway snapped in half and fell onto the highway outside Lowe's Motor Speedway on Saturday night. A total of 107 people received medical treatment, track spokesman Jerry Gappens said.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. George Deukmejian on Tuesday convened his special commission to investigate the collapse of the Nimitz Freeway and the Bay Bridge in the Northern California earthquake, asking the board to determine why the failures occurred and whether they could have been prevented. "The people of our state are entitled to a comprehensive, thorough and objective examination of the failure of these structures," Deukmejian told the panel.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | MARK ARAX and LISA RESPERS and MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The storms that have barreled across California for several days turned deadly at week's end, killing at least six people, leaving six more missing, flooding vast tracts of farmland, forcing hundreds to flee their homes and shutting a section of the state's major north-south freeway, as the first front finally made its belated push into the Southland on Friday night and early Saturday morning.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top Caltrans engineer said Wednesday that he was exaggerating in an effort to win funding when he wrote in 1987 that a severe earthquake in the Los Angeles area could topple many bridges, killing more than 100 people. The memo written by James E. Roberts, chief of the department's structures division, did not contemplate the collapse of the Nimitz Freeway in Oakland or other structures of that kind, which are supported by multiple concrete columns.
NEWS
November 14, 1994 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The greater-than-expected damage to Los Angeles' freeway system in the Northridge earthquake can be blamed on the slow pace of a seismic strengthening program that is still years away from fixing some of the state's most vulnerable bridges, a panel of engineers has found.
NEWS
March 1, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young lovers who climb to the top of Zhaobao Mountain in this scenic port city gaze out on a varied panorama. Rolling green hills to one side. A tranquil island offshore. And a massive white elephant directly below. Officially, it's known as Zhaobao Mountain Bridge, and it was scheduled to open in October. But a month shy of its debut, the 1 1/2-mile-long span started to quiver and sway. Inspectors soon discovered the cause: cracks in the bridge stemming from a design flaw.
NATIONAL
December 2, 2007 | By P.J. Huffstutter and Times Staff Writer
When the Interstate 35W bridge collapsed last summer, raining concrete and vehicles just steps away from a high-tech University of Minnesota laboratory, radiology professor Bruce Hammer thought he had narrowly escaped the disaster. He, his colleagues and their students and researchers were safe, and more than a million dollars' worth of scientific equipment inside the two-story lab was undamaged.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | DAVID WILLMAN and CLAIRE SPIEGEL and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Powerless to prevent his 14-ton vehicle from jerking half a lane to the right, Faust braked to a heart-pounding stop. Then he swung the 40-foot bus sideways--blocking oncoming drivers from what only he and a handful of others could see: A gaping chasm in the eight-lane Simi Valley Freeway, where it once crossed San Fernando Mission Boulevard. "It was like looking down into a pit, a void," said Faust, whose bus was not carrying passengers. "My thought was: 'Am I going to get out of here safely?'
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