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Bright Sheng

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Jiang Ching was no stranger to opera. As a poor girl growing up in China during the 1920s, she became infatuated by arias from traditional Chinese opera. She first caught Mao Tse-tung's eye as a young, seductive opera performer. Later as Madame Mao, she instigated a new kind of propagandistic Chinese opera to help promote the Cultural Revolution.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Jiang Ching was no stranger to opera. As a poor girl growing up in China during the 1920s, she became infatuated by arias from traditional Chinese opera. She first caught Mao Tse-tung's eye as a young, seductive opera performer. Later as Madame Mao, she instigated a new kind of propagandistic Chinese opera to help promote the Cultural Revolution.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1994
Pacific Symphony has announced two pairs of chamber-music concerts at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, continuing the chamber-music program the orchestra revived last year after a four-year hiatus. Each program will be given twice, and the $50 concert ticket will include a dinner at the museum's Topaz Cafe. Dinners begin at 6 p.m., concerts at 8 p.m. The first pair of programs Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2003 | Chris Pasles
Yo-Yo Ma will perform the premiere of a cello concerto by Chen Yi as part of the Pacific Symphony's annual "American Composers Festival," Feb. 28-March 21, in several Orange County venues. Under the theme "Trade Winds From China," the festival will look at the Chinese Cultural Revolution and its impact on Chinese culture as well as Western influences on Eastern art and music. It will be the first of three festivals planned to focus on non-European music.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2003
I was most appreciative of the substantial article on the preparation for the premiere of Bright Sheng's opera on the life of Madame Mao in Santa Fe ("Taking a Musical Career Risk Into Thin Air," by Diane Haithman, July 20). You absolutely captured Bright's brilliance, energy and compelling personality. He is undoubtedly one of his generation's most outstanding composers. As executive director of a symphony orchestra in New Jersey in 1990, I had the privilege of working with Bright in the performance of two of his works a few days after Leonard Bernstein died -- "H'un (Lacerations)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES
The Pacific Symphony has announced two pairs of chamber music concerts at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana, continuing the chamber music program the orchestra revived last year after a four-year hiatus. Each program will be given twice, and the $50 per-concert price tag will include a dinner at the museum's Topaz Cafe. The dinners begin at 6 p.m., concerts at 8. The first pair of concerts will be Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ten years ago, the mini-festival "Musics Alive!" sprouted in Ventura County, fueled by an intriguing premise--blending new and world music. In this offshoot of the New West Symphony, programming focuses on contemporary classical and non-western "world music." Last weekend's 10th-anniversary festival was host to Chinese composer Bright Sheng, who came to the U.S. in 1982.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1999 | RICHARD S. GINELL
Ma will try anything at least once. This is one of his most successful risks, an all-solo cello album of 20th century music that follows a coherent programmatic direction from start to finish. First, a transcription of fiddler Mark O'Connor's plain-spoken "Appalachia Waltz" serves as an opening prayer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
The Pacific Symphony will highlight its 2003-04 season, and its 25th anniversary year, with five commissioned world premieres. It will also devote its second annual American Composers Festival to the works of Chinese American composers. The season opens Oct. 8 at the Orange County Performing Arts Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES
The coloristic and expressive possibilities of a string quartet and a single clarinet are deftly, distinctly explored in works written within this decade by five prominent American composers. John Corigliano's "Soliloquy," an adaptation of the second movement of his earlier Concerto for Clarinet, is heartfelt. Ellen Taaffe Zwilich's Quintet makes crystalline and haunting points throughout its five movements.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
In prospect extremely promising, in practice appallingly disappointing, a program devoted entirely to new works for the piano as played by Peter Serkin was performed in Royce Hall on Friday night. An audience of decent size attended, and stayed through intermission. Those who remained longer were not rewarded.
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