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WORLD
September 26, 2010 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Britain's Labor Party chose the younger of two brothers as its new leader Saturday, selecting Ed Miliband over his older sibling to lead the party back from its electoral drubbing this spring after 13 years in power. Miliband, 40, who served as secretary for energy and climate change in the government of former Prime Minister Gordon Brown, is the youngest leader in Labor Party history. After three other rivals were eliminated, he defeated his brother, David, the former foreign secretary who until recently was considered the favorite, by slightly more than one percentage point in balloting on the eve of the party's annual conference.
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WORLD
September 26, 2010 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Britain's Labor Party chose the younger of two brothers as its new leader Saturday, selecting Ed Miliband over his older sibling to lead the party back from its electoral drubbing this spring after 13 years in power. Miliband, 40, who served as secretary for energy and climate change in the government of former Prime Minister Gordon Brown, is the youngest leader in Labor Party history. After three other rivals were eliminated, he defeated his brother, David, the former foreign secretary who until recently was considered the favorite, by slightly more than one percentage point in balloting on the eve of the party's annual conference.
WORLD
June 29, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The last time Britain's Labor Party was banished to the political wilderness, it wandered there, chastened and weak, for 18 years. This time, party stalwart Frances Butt doesn't expect such a long exile. "I don't feel quite as depressed about this, because in my mind, it's only temporary," Butt, 66, said of the party's recent fall from grace. "It gives us time to regroup, to get ourselves organized, to get focused and to get our energies back." After 13 years in government, the left-of-center Labor was exhausted and limping by last month's general election.
WORLD
June 29, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The last time Britain's Labor Party was banished to the political wilderness, it wandered there, chastened and weak, for 18 years. This time, party stalwart Frances Butt doesn't expect such a long exile. "I don't feel quite as depressed about this, because in my mind, it's only temporary," Butt, 66, said of the party's recent fall from grace. "It gives us time to regroup, to get ourselves organized, to get focused and to get our energies back." After 13 years in government, the left-of-center Labor was exhausted and limping by last month's general election.
WORLD
May 6, 2010 | By Janet Stobart and Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
In the trendy neighborhood where it all began, the centrist revolution led by Tony Blair — the swaggering days of "Cool Britannia," the unprecedented 13 years of Labor Party rule — could be sputtering to an exhausted, inglorious end. The north London borough of Islington is the spiritual home of "New Labor," the modern, sleek, election-winning machine that Blair, a onetime resident, honed out of the unreconstructed old Marxist party....
OPINION
October 5, 1986 | John Grimond, John Grimond is an assistant editor on the Economist
Has Britain's Labor Party changed? After eight years in opposition and two electoral defeats, its leaders know that the old image of the Labor Party is not a vote-grabber. So, at their annual conference last week, they took pains to sell the electorate a new, improved version. Out goes the working-class, loony-left Labor, symbolized by the cloth-cap and clenched fist; in comes the middle-class, pastel-tints Labor, symbolized by the red rose that worked so well for France's Socialists.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A "disappointed" Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher said Friday that despite one of her Conservative Party's most humiliating by-election defeats in more than half a century, she will stick to the policies that have kept her in office for nearly 11 years. "We are not a 'fair-weather' party," the 64-year-old prime minister stated in a letter to party Chairman Kenneth Baker. "We are not for trimming and turning."
NEWS
November 17, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister John Major "repeatedly misled" Parliament about Britain's pre-Persian Gulf War aid to Iraq, Labor Party trade spokesman Robin Cook charged Monday, insisting that new, confidential government documents prove his claim "beyond a reasonable doubt." But Major continued to deny that he had early knowledge of a shipment of arms-making machine tools from Britain to Baghdad.
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | MAUREEN JOHNSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
From the days of Queen Elizabeth I, power, honors and titles have flowed smoothly down the generations of the Cecil family for skillful and loyal service to crown and country. William Cecil, the first Earl of Burghley, engineered the execution of Elizabeth's cousin, the Catholic Mary Queen of Scots in 1587. His son, the 1st Earl of Salisbury, paved the way for James I to succeed Elizabeth.
WORLD
May 6, 2010 | By Janet Stobart and Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
In the trendy neighborhood where it all began, the centrist revolution led by Tony Blair — the swaggering days of "Cool Britannia," the unprecedented 13 years of Labor Party rule — could be sputtering to an exhausted, inglorious end. The north London borough of Islington is the spiritual home of "New Labor," the modern, sleek, election-winning machine that Blair, a onetime resident, honed out of the unreconstructed old Marxist party....
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | MAUREEN JOHNSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
From the days of Queen Elizabeth I, power, honors and titles have flowed smoothly down the generations of the Cecil family for skillful and loyal service to crown and country. William Cecil, the first Earl of Burghley, engineered the execution of Elizabeth's cousin, the Catholic Mary Queen of Scots in 1587. His son, the 1st Earl of Salisbury, paved the way for James I to succeed Elizabeth.
NEWS
November 17, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister John Major "repeatedly misled" Parliament about Britain's pre-Persian Gulf War aid to Iraq, Labor Party trade spokesman Robin Cook charged Monday, insisting that new, confidential government documents prove his claim "beyond a reasonable doubt." But Major continued to deny that he had early knowledge of a shipment of arms-making machine tools from Britain to Baghdad.
OPINION
July 19, 1992 | Martin Walker, Martin Walker is the U.S. Bureau Chief for Britain's the Guardian
On that April night when Neil Kinnock's new model Labor Party confounded the pundits and opinion polls and lost the British election, Bill Clinton tore up the speech of triumph he was planning to deliver. The speech was to have been about "a wind of change sweeping across the Atlantic," just as Margaret Thatcher's victory in 1979, had paved the way for the Reagan Revolution the following year, so, once again, the political fortunes of the Anglo-Saxon world were moving in step.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A "disappointed" Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher said Friday that despite one of her Conservative Party's most humiliating by-election defeats in more than half a century, she will stick to the policies that have kept her in office for nearly 11 years. "We are not a 'fair-weather' party," the 64-year-old prime minister stated in a letter to party Chairman Kenneth Baker. "We are not for trimming and turning."
OPINION
July 19, 1992 | Martin Walker, Martin Walker is the U.S. Bureau Chief for Britain's the Guardian
On that April night when Neil Kinnock's new model Labor Party confounded the pundits and opinion polls and lost the British election, Bill Clinton tore up the speech of triumph he was planning to deliver. The speech was to have been about "a wind of change sweeping across the Atlantic," just as Margaret Thatcher's victory in 1979, had paved the way for the Reagan Revolution the following year, so, once again, the political fortunes of the Anglo-Saxon world were moving in step.
OPINION
October 5, 1986 | John Grimond, John Grimond is an assistant editor on the Economist
Has Britain's Labor Party changed? After eight years in opposition and two electoral defeats, its leaders know that the old image of the Labor Party is not a vote-grabber. So, at their annual conference last week, they took pains to sell the electorate a new, improved version. Out goes the working-class, loony-left Labor, symbolized by the cloth-cap and clenched fist; in comes the middle-class, pastel-tints Labor, symbolized by the red rose that worked so well for France's Socialists.
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