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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1986 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Anna Neagle, who rendered consummate and definitive performances in roles ranging from Peter Pan to Queen Victoria in a career of more than 60 years, died in a nursing home near London on Tuesday. She was 81 and the Associated Press quoted a friend as saying "She hadn't been ill. . . . She just faded away." Last month, suffering from exhaustion, she was ordered to leave the cast of "Cinderella," where she was seen at the London Palladium as the Fairy Godmother twice each day.
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WORLD
August 4, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Ironic detachment may be the guiding principle of acceptable behavior in Britain, but Hannah Prince is having none of it. British flag in hand, the 21-year-old university student traveled to London from western England to attend the Olympics with her boyfriend, both of them ready to cheer their hearts out for "Team GB" with no trace of self-consciousness. "We're a lot more reserved than other nations, whereas Americans will wave their flags at anything. We should do more of it," Prince said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Robin Winks, a Yale historian of the British Empire and an authority on international espionage, has died. He was 72. Winks died Monday at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut of complications from a stroke. In five decades of teaching at Yale, Winks wrote 30 books and was a favorite lecturer for his colorful approach and intellectual energy. He was an expert on the history of Canada, New Zealand and Australia, and traveled to most former British colonies to soak up local history and culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012
Editor's Note: The British Empire once spanned the globe so that, as a proud boast went, the sun never set upon it. So what happened? Economic scholar Kwasi Kwarteng sets out to explain the empire's dissolution - and its legacy today - in "Ghosts of Empire: Britain's Legacies in the Modern World" (PublicAffairs: 467 pp., $29.99). Though born in London and educated at Cambridge, Kwarteng has felt the influence of that empire through his parents, immigrants from what was once one of those former colonies, Ghana.
BOOKS
August 21, 1994 | DICK RORABACK
Cousins or no cousins, the kaiser hated the British. They diminished him. So he hatched this Grand Scheme. He would foster a jihad--a holy war. The Germans would then lead millions of Muslims across the Ottoman Empire through Persia to Afghanistan, whence they would seize India, cutting Britain off at the roots, and knocking off Russia at the same time. Two could play at this empire game. It was an end run around World War I, and it had its moments, and its men.
NEWS
June 15, 1997 | MAUREEN JOHNSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In St. Helena, a remote island in the South Atlantic, a meeting between a group of unemployed locals and the British governor turned angry. Someone grabbed Gov. David Smallman's tie. Compared with 50 years ago, when millions of Indians rioted against British rule, the recent incident ranks small. But so does what's left of the British Empire. When Britain returns Hong Kong, with its 6.
WORLD
June 16, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Author Salman Rushdie, who was forced into hiding for a decade after Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini ordered his assassination, has been made a knight, Buckingham Palace announced today. Soccer star David Beckham was not. Cricketer Ian Botham was. CNN reporter Christiane Amanpour was named Commander of the Order of the British Empire, or CBE.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Irish rock star and global humanitarian Bono became a knight of the British empire Thursday -- and joked that his youngest son thought he was about to become a Jedi instead. Bono, 46, was named a Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire in an informal, laugh-filled ceremony in the Dublin home of British Ambassador David Reddaway. "You have permission to call me anything you want -- except sir, all right?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1988 | LEONARD KLADY, Following are capsule reviews of screenings in the American Film Institute's BritFest during the UK/LA '88 Festival. All screenings are in the Mark Goodson Theater on the AFI campus in Hollywood
FRIDAY 'LIVING ON THE EDGE' Goodson, 8:45 pm. Michael Grigsby's down-beat documentary focuses on three British families who have seen their nation go from world leadership to economic catastrophe. Effectively weaving film and radio archival material and pop music with the personal dilemmas, the film manages to instill a sense of individual and national loss. One's left with the feeling of a sinking British Empire no one can possibly prop up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1985
Queen Elizabeth II's New Year's honors list named three Los Angeles-area Britons to ranks in the Order of the British Empire. The three, all British subjects who have promoted British trade and culture in the Southland for years, were honored by the Queen, who had met two of them on her visit to California two years ago, said a spokesman for the British consul general here.
OPINION
August 26, 2011 | By Jerrold M. Post
In March, a few days after NATO planes began bombing Libya, Moammar Kadafi delivered a speech to the nation he had ruled for more than four decades. "Great Libyan people," he began, "you are now living through glorious hours. " In the speech, designed to rally Libyans with soaring rhetoric to stand against the rebellion and the foreign attacks, Kadafi ended with a promise. "We will defeat them by any means.... We are ready for the fight, whether it will be a short or a long one....
WORLD
June 25, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
For decades, R.C. Sharma has regulated time in one-second increments. Now, as he offers tea to visitors, surrounded by boxes of precision machinery and the sign that graced his watch-repair shop for so long, he's wistful as he sees time, and an era, wind down. "I'm already 74," he said, "and there's not much time left." The gentlemanly watch man inhabits the ever-shrinking corner of India, which still looks to the era of the British Empire, where traditional craftsmanship trumps profit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2010 | By Keith Thursby
Dick Francis, a champion steeplechase jockey in Britain who became a bestselling mystery writer, died Sunday at his home in the Cayman Islands. He was 89. Ruth Cairns, a spokeswoman for Francis, told the Associated Press that the author died of natural causes. He wrote more than 40 novels, many featuring racing as a theme, after retiring from racing in 1957. "I haven't suffered the same injuries as my characters, but I have suffered pain and I know it," he told The Times during a visit to Southern California in 1981.
BOOKS
March 23, 2008 | Kristina Lindgren
IN his 90 years, British historian Eric Hobsbawm has seen war and contemplated its catastrophic impact on societies large and small. In his latest collection of essays, "On Empire: America, War, and Global Supremacy" (Pantheon: 128 pp., $19.
OPINION
November 4, 2007 | Piers Brendon, Piers Brendon is the author of "The Decline and Fall of the British Empire," to be published in the U.S. next year by Knopf.
In 1774, an English newspaper called Lloyd's Evening Post published a futuristic fantasy. It was set in 1974 and featured two visitors from "the empire of America" touring the ruins of London. These resembled Piranesi's prints of Roman ruins -- empty, rubble-strewn streets, a single broken wall where Parliament once stood, Whitehall as a turnip field, Westminster Abbey a stable, the Inns of Court a pile of stones "possessed by hawks and rooks," and St.
OPINION
September 9, 2007 | David Rieff, David Rieff is the author of many books, including "At the Point of a Gun: Democratic Dreams and Armed Intervention" and "A Bed for the Night: Humanitarianism in Crisis."
In Washington these days, people talk a lot about the collapse of the bipartisan foreign policy consensus that existed during the Cold War. But however bitter today's disputes are about Iraq or the prosecution of the so-called global war on terrorism, there is one bedrock assumption about foreign policy that remains truly bipartisan: The United States will remain the sole superpower, and the guarantor of international security and global trade, for the foreseeable future.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2003 | From Associated Press
Actress Joan Plowright, wife of the late Laurence Olivier, is being designated a British dame, the female equivalent of a knight, on the annual New Year's honors list announced by the Queen in London today. Guitarist Eric Clapton and the Kinks' Ray Davies are receiving royal honors, becoming commanders of the Order of the British Empire. The same award is going to "Billy Elliot" director Stephen Daldry and cartoonist Ronald Searle, 83. Meanwhile, the Sunday Times published a list of 300 well-known people -- including singer David Bowie, comedian John Cleese and actors Albert Finney and Kenneth Branagh -- who had declined honors since 1945.
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
Queen Elizabeth II made Ronald Reagan a knight today, but without the kneeling and dubbing because the knighthood is honorary for foreigners, who cannot be called "Sir." The Buckingham Palace announcement ended days of speculation about whether the former President, whose easy manner and conservative ardor made him a firm friend of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, would receive the highest honor for non-Britons. Honors to foreigners are recommended by the government. Reagan told reporters outside the palace: "I feel greatly honored."
WORLD
June 16, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Author Salman Rushdie, who was forced into hiding for a decade after Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini ordered his assassination, has been made a knight, Buckingham Palace announced today. Soccer star David Beckham was not. Cricketer Ian Botham was. CNN reporter Christiane Amanpour was named Commander of the Order of the British Empire, or CBE.
OPINION
May 13, 2007 | William Dalrymple, WILLIAM DALRYMPLE'S new book on the 1857 uprising, "The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty, Delhi 1857," has just been awarded the Duff Cooper Prize for History and Biography.
IN EARLY MAY 1857 -- 150 years ago this month -- the British empire found itself threatened by the largest and bloodiest anti-colonial revolt to face any European empire anywhere in the world during the 19th century. The British had been trading in India through the East India Co. since the early 1600s. But in the late 1700s, the dynamic had begun to shift.
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