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British Iraq

NEWS
November 11, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The British government allowed sophisticated machinery to be shipped to Iraq in the late 1980s despite knowledge that the equipment was essential to Iraqi efforts to build a nuclear weapon and other armaments, according to intelligence documents intended for disclosure at a London trial.
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WORLD
June 21, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
For the second consecutive day, coalition aircraft bombed an Iraqi military site in retaliation for increasing attacks on British and American planes patrolling "no-fly" zones, U.S. defense officials said. Precision-guided weapons were used to strike a facility in southern Iraq, said a statement from the U.S. Central Command. British and American defense officials have expressed concern that for more than a month, Iraq's air defenses have been more aggressively trying to shoot down U.S.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. weapons inspection team accused by Iraq of fronting for an American spy will leave Baghdad as scheduled today after being blocked in its investigation by the Iraqi government, officials said Thursday. The 28 inspectors led by retired U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Scott Ritter were prevented from visiting sites suspected of harboring evidence of Iraqi biological weapons research after the Iraqi government branded Ritter a U.S. agent, an allegation denied by Ritter and the U.N.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
Customs officials said they foiled an attempt today to smuggle 40 U.S.-made nuclear trigger components to Iraq via London. They said five people were arrested, including an Iraqi who was picked up at Heathrow Airport and is being expelled from Britain. The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the devices arrived from the United States two days earlier and were kept under surveillance until the alleged smugglers attempted to put them on a scheduled Iraqi Airways flight to Baghdad.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Turkish Parliament voted Wednesday to allow the government to deploy Turkish troops abroad, a move that may put a new Muslim and NATO ally alongside U.S. troops in the deserts of Saudi Arabia. The parliamentary vote also permitted the government to host foreign troops on Turkish soil, which would allow the swift deployment or reinforcement of U.S. forces at air bases in southeastern Turkey near Iraq.
NEWS
January 25, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After failing to achieve a blanket denunciation of U.S.-British airstrikes, Iraq's chief diplomat stormed out of a meeting of Arab League foreign ministers here Sunday and angrily accused fellow Arab states of bowing to the dictates of Washington. Iraqi Foreign Minister Mohammed Said Sahaf expressed bitterness that the long-sought meeting, called to forge an Arab consensus on U.N. sanctions and U.S. military actions against Iraq, had fallen short of Baghdad's hopes in almost every particular.
OPINION
May 30, 2005
Re "The Berlin-Baghdad Connection," Commentary, May 25: I am not a great fan of German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, but Andres Martinez's claim that he is "the world leader most responsible for war in Iraq" is either completely cynical or utterly delusional. We know from former U.S. Treasury Secretary Paul H. O'Neill's memoirs, a British Cabinet memo confirmed as authentic, and various other rock-solid sources what most people had long suspected: that George Bush had made up his mind to invade Iraq well before Schroeder's August 2002 statement of firm opposition to a war. To blame that opposition for the fact that Bush continued with the disastrous plan he had already settled on -- and then use terms like "perfidy" to attack Schroeder's perfectly legitimate statement of his government's position -- puts Martinez on a level of illogic, incivility and outright dishonesty that should not only have made you spike the article but should bar Martinez from any future appearances in a reputable newspaper.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening a second front in the gulf war, American warplanes flying from Turkish bases are attacking targets in Iraq, Western diplomats and Turkish officials said here Friday. They described Turkish government support for raids against Iraq as a risky political gamble by President Turgut Ozal. The sources said the first strike came before dawn Friday when American fighter-bombers from Incirlik Air Base, near the southern Turkish city of Adana, struck in northern Iraq.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. warplane fired a missile at an Iraqi antiaircraft radar installation Tuesday, punctuating a low-intensity but potentially lethal conflict made increasingly dangerous, U.S. officials say, by Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's growing level of frustration.
OPINION
April 1, 2003 | Bennett Ramberg, Bennett Ramberg was in the State Department during the first Bush administration and is author of "Nuclear Power Plants as Weapons for the Enemy" (University of California Press, 1984). E-mail: bennettramberg @aol.com.
There is little doubt that Iran, which for the moment has neither a bomb nor nuclear weapons material, has learned much from North Korea and Iraq. Iraq teaches the mullahs that failure to move forward rapidly to get the bomb puts a nuclear aspirant in the U.S. cross hairs. By contrast, North Korea demonstrates that once a nation gets the bomb or weapons material, there is little the U.S. or others can do to halt a program.
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