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NEWS
May 18, 2001 | From Reuters
The Food and Drug Administration, charged with guarding the health of all Americans, is compromised by funding from the drug industry and pressure from Congress, the editor of a top British medical journal said Friday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
November 26, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Apparently, not all pills got the memo about, first, doing no harm. Many formulations of common medications contain high levels of sodium, and a new study finds that people who take those medications are 22% more likely to suffer a non-fatal stroke and 28% more likely to die of any cause than people who take the same medications in formulations that do not contain sodium. Among the patients in the study who took medications containing sodium, the median daily sodium dose from those medicines  alone was 106.8 millimoles a day -- higher than recommended daily maximum dietary intake of 104 millimoles a day. The newest study on sodium in medicines was published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal (BMJ)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The 82-year-old blind man had recently developed urinary incontinence as a result of receiving diuretics from his physician. During a visit by a childhood friend, an Australian shepherd, the friend mentioned that he had cured a similar problem by inserting a dry kidney bean to block the leakage. The shepherd said he replaced the bean every 24 hours, using specially adapted blunt-ended tweezers. Before the friend returned to Australia, he gave the blind man some of his own beans.
HEALTH
December 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
It's not unusual to hear about someone figuratively jumping into their work with both feet. Dr. Peter Lommer Kristensen did it literally. Kristensen, of the Hillerod Hospital in Hillerod, Denmark, and two of his colleagues investigated an old Danish myth that it is possible to get drunk by immersing your feet in alcohol. To do so, they soaked their feet in a washtub containing three bottles of vodka for three hours. They measured blood concentrations of alcohol every half-hour and rated themselves on a scale of 0 to 10 on self-confidence, urge to speak and the number of times they desired spontaneous hugs.
SCIENCE
January 30, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh ii
Thirty-four years after the fact, a British physician who is now a member of the House of Lords has confessed to fabricating a disease called "cello scrotum" and getting its details published in the prestigious British Medical Journal. The "disease" was ostensibly characterized by chafing of the scrotum when the instrument was placed between a cellist's legs.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2005
The British Medical Journal has retracted a report that said Eli Lilly & Co. documents suggesting a link between Prozac and a heightened risk of suicide attempts and violence had gone missing for years.
SCIENCE
January 20, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sanitation was voted the most important medical milestone in the last 150 years on Thursday in a poll conducted by the British Medical Journal. Improved sewage disposal and clean water supply systems, which have reduced diseases such as cholera, was the favorite of 11,341 people worldwide who voted in the survey.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A British medical journal is now speculating that 19th-Century violinist Nicolo Paganini, considered the world's first virtuoso instrumentalist, probably died from mercury poisoning after his doctors prescribed the substance as a cure for syphilis. The master's cause of death was given in 1840 as tuberculosis, but Paganini probably died because doctors gave him mercury, then the standard cure for syphilis, according to Dr. J. G.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2004
* Drug giant Merck & Co should have pulled its Vioxx painkiller from the market four years ago because data showing that it raised the risk of heart attacks has existed since 2000, Swiss scientists said. In a report for British medical journal the Lancet, researchers at the University of Bern said there was substantial evidence of the dangerous side effects of the drug by the end of 2000, but the data were not analyzed properly. * * Chiron Corp.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2005 | From Reuters
The British Medical Journal said it has sent documents to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that it said appear to suggest a link between the antidepressant drug Prozac and suicidal behavior. The journal said an anonymous source had provided "missing documents" relating to clinical trials of the drug, made by Indianapolis-based drug maker Eli Lilly & Co. Lilly said it had always sought to publicly disclose data and was unaware of any allegations that documents were missing from its trials.
SCIENCE
January 30, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh ii
Thirty-four years after the fact, a British physician who is now a member of the House of Lords has confessed to fabricating a disease called "cello scrotum" and getting its details published in the prestigious British Medical Journal. The "disease" was ostensibly characterized by chafing of the scrotum when the instrument was placed between a cellist's legs.
SCIENCE
January 20, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sanitation was voted the most important medical milestone in the last 150 years on Thursday in a poll conducted by the British Medical Journal. Improved sewage disposal and clean water supply systems, which have reduced diseases such as cholera, was the favorite of 11,341 people worldwide who voted in the survey.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2005
The British Medical Journal has retracted a report that said Eli Lilly & Co. documents suggesting a link between Prozac and a heightened risk of suicide attempts and violence had gone missing for years.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2005 | From Reuters
The British Medical Journal said it has sent documents to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that it said appear to suggest a link between the antidepressant drug Prozac and suicidal behavior. The journal said an anonymous source had provided "missing documents" relating to clinical trials of the drug, made by Indianapolis-based drug maker Eli Lilly & Co. Lilly said it had always sought to publicly disclose data and was unaware of any allegations that documents were missing from its trials.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2004
* Drug giant Merck & Co should have pulled its Vioxx painkiller from the market four years ago because data showing that it raised the risk of heart attacks has existed since 2000, Swiss scientists said. In a report for British medical journal the Lancet, researchers at the University of Bern said there was substantial evidence of the dangerous side effects of the drug by the end of 2000, but the data were not analyzed properly. * * Chiron Corp.
HEALTH
December 24, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL
Medical journals don't tend to be light reading fodder, filled as they are with turgid clinical trials, ads for heartburn drugs and graphically illustrated diseases-of-the-week. But come December, a few lighten up--even get a bit silly. Most notable is the British Medical Journal, which in less festive times tends to run articles with titles such as "Empirical Treatment of Uncomplicated Cystitis" and "The Impact of New Drugs on Management of Glaucoma in Scotland."
SCIENCE
November 26, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Apparently, not all pills got the memo about, first, doing no harm. Many formulations of common medications contain high levels of sodium, and a new study finds that people who take those medications are 22% more likely to suffer a non-fatal stroke and 28% more likely to die of any cause than people who take the same medications in formulations that do not contain sodium. Among the patients in the study who took medications containing sodium, the median daily sodium dose from those medicines  alone was 106.8 millimoles a day -- higher than recommended daily maximum dietary intake of 104 millimoles a day. The newest study on sodium in medicines was published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal (BMJ)
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
St. John's wort, a plant used in European folk medicines to relieve depression, might actually ease some of the symptoms in some people, researchers reported Friday. A review of 23 different studies, most published in non-English medical journals, suggested that St. John's wort, known scientifically as Hypericum perforatum, worked 2.7 times better than a placebo and roughly as well as many antidepressant drugs in mildly depressed people. Relief of symptoms generally took days or weeks to occur.
NEWS
May 18, 2001 | From Reuters
The Food and Drug Administration, charged with guarding the health of all Americans, is compromised by funding from the drug industry and pressure from Congress, the editor of a top British medical journal said Friday.
HEALTH
December 20, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, which normally offers images of patients' brains, spinal columns and joints, has now been used by Dutch researchers to view human genitalia during sexual intercourse. Such efforts to learn more about the physiology of the act have a long history. Researchers William H. Masters and Virginia E. Johnson wired subjects with electrodes decades ago to study the effects of arousal.
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