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NEWS
August 2, 1996 | From Associated Press
Breaking open glass tubes stored in freezing nitrogen, scientists at fertility clinics in Britain reluctantly destroyed several thousand abandoned human embryos Thursday under a law limiting storage to five years. The government rejected pleas from anti-abortion activists to intervene to save the embryos.
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WORLD
December 24, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Nearly 60 years after his death, Alan Turing, the British scientist whose code-breaking work helped the Allies beat Adolf Hitler and whom many consider the father of artificial intelligence, received a royal pardon Tuesday for the crime of having had sex with another man. Turing felt humiliated after he was convicted in 1952 of "gross indecency," the charge used against gay men in an age when homosexual relations were illegal in Britain....
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SCIENCE
February 4, 2002
They were huge, lumbering and certainly not the most graceful of creatures, but when they had to, dinosaurs sure could run, according to British scientists. Using prints from a fossilized dinosaur track in a quarry from southern England, a team from the University of Cambridge calculated that bipedal theropod dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus rex could run at speeds of up to 19 mph.
SCIENCE
April 17, 2010 | Reuters
British scientists say they have mastered a controversial technique using cloning technology to prevent some incurable inherited diseases by swapping DNA between two fertilized human eggs. Lead researcher Doug Turnbull of Newcastle University said this week that he hoped the first babies free from so-called mitochondrial diseases would be born within three years. The technique replaces mitochondrial DNA, which is passed down the maternal line. One in 6,500 children is born with serious diseases caused by malfunctioning mitochondrial DNA. The technique is a variation of the one used to clone Dolly the sheep in 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Images of the faintest galaxies ever seen show they are much older than astronomers thought and date back at least 10 billion years, British scientists report in the Sept. 19 Nature. The blue-tinted galaxies were seen during an unusually long look at an apparently blank area of sky by the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. "These very faint galaxies are very blue," said Tom Shanks of the University of Durham. Blue-tinged light means the galaxies are young and still forming.
SCIENCE
April 17, 2010 | Reuters
British scientists say they have mastered a controversial technique using cloning technology to prevent some incurable inherited diseases by swapping DNA between two fertilized human eggs. Lead researcher Doug Turnbull of Newcastle University said this week that he hoped the first babies free from so-called mitochondrial diseases would be born within three years. The technique replaces mitochondrial DNA, which is passed down the maternal line. One in 6,500 children is born with serious diseases caused by malfunctioning mitochondrial DNA. The technique is a variation of the one used to clone Dolly the sheep in 1996.
SCIENCE
September 15, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British scientists have eliminated one potential explanation for the Neanderthals' extinction 26,000 to 32,000 years ago. Using a core sample of ocean sediment drilled from Venezuela's Cariaco Basin, researchers from the University of Leeds concluded that there were no significant changes in climate during the period. That leaves elimination of the Neanderthals by modern humans as the most likely explanation, they reported Thursday in the journal Nature.
NEWS
June 24, 1988
Four British scientists repeated a charge they first made in 1985--that at least two tons of British plutonium, enough for 400 nuclear warheads, is unaccounted for and could have been switched from civil to military use.
SCIENCE
May 13, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Whales originated from land animals that looked like pigs, but changes in their inner ear helped them evolve into acrobatic swimmers, British scientists reported in the May 9 issue of Nature. By studying fossils of whales, the team uncovered clues about the evolution of cetaceans--whales, dolphins and porpoises--and how and when they became such agile sea creatures. Whales left land permanently about 45 million years ago.
NEWS
May 11, 1987 | United Press International
British scientists have uncovered the first evidence that genetic factors might play a role in a person's susceptibility to the AIDS virus, a published report said Sunday. A team of British researchers have identified a form of an inherited protein that appears to reduce vulnerability to infection by the AIDS virus and to slow development of the disease among those who are exposed, the New York Times reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2009 | Sara Lippincott
Late this year, if all goes as planned, a 90-year-old James Lovelock will rocket into suborbital space as Virgin Galactic's premier spaceflight tourist. It's a two-hour-plus trip that includes several minutes of weightlessness, during which Lovelock will be able to take an affectionate look at his first love, Gaia -- our blue planet.
SCIENCE
September 15, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British scientists have eliminated one potential explanation for the Neanderthals' extinction 26,000 to 32,000 years ago. Using a core sample of ocean sediment drilled from Venezuela's Cariaco Basin, researchers from the University of Leeds concluded that there were no significant changes in climate during the period. That leaves elimination of the Neanderthals by modern humans as the most likely explanation, they reported Thursday in the journal Nature.
WORLD
March 16, 2006 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
John D. Barrow, a Cambridge University cosmologist who has researched and written extensively about the relationship between life and the universe, on Wednesday was awarded the 2006 Templeton Prize, worth about $1.4 million, for progress in spiritual knowledge. Barrow, 53, a professor of mathematical sciences who once held research fellowships in astronomy and physics at UC Berkeley, is the sixth scientist to win the award, considered the Nobel Prize for religion.
SCIENCE
May 13, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Whales originated from land animals that looked like pigs, but changes in their inner ear helped them evolve into acrobatic swimmers, British scientists reported in the May 9 issue of Nature. By studying fossils of whales, the team uncovered clues about the evolution of cetaceans--whales, dolphins and porpoises--and how and when they became such agile sea creatures. Whales left land permanently about 45 million years ago.
SCIENCE
February 4, 2002
They were huge, lumbering and certainly not the most graceful of creatures, but when they had to, dinosaurs sure could run, according to British scientists. Using prints from a fossilized dinosaur track in a quarry from southern England, a team from the University of Cambridge calculated that bipedal theropod dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus rex could run at speeds of up to 19 mph.
NEWS
October 9, 2001 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
For discovering how cells divide--work that goes to the heart of understanding the chaotic, lethal growth of cancer--a Seattle geneticist and two British scientists shared the 2001 Nobel Prize in Medicine on Monday. On the 100th anniversary of what is considered the world's most prestigious award, Leland H.
NEWS
April 25, 1986 | Associated Press
One of the world's most valuable fossils, showing the evolutionary link between dinosaurs and birds, has been re-authenticated with new tests, dispelling accusations that it is a fake, British scientists say. Researchers from the British Museum of Natural History, rising to defend their most prized fossil, say their detailed tests prove that the specimen was not fabricated in an elaborate 19th-Century hoax.
NEWS
October 10, 1996 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Six researchers from the United States and Britain were awarded Nobel Prizes in physics and chemistry Wednesday for discovering unexpected phenomena that defied known laws of nature. The physics prize--for finding a unique form of helium that can flow uphill--went to Stanford University's Douglas D. Osheroff and Cornell University colleagues David M. Lee and Robert C. Richardson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Images of the faintest galaxies ever seen show they are much older than astronomers thought and date back at least 10 billion years, British scientists report in the Sept. 19 Nature. The blue-tinted galaxies were seen during an unusually long look at an apparently blank area of sky by the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. "These very faint galaxies are very blue," said Tom Shanks of the University of Durham. Blue-tinged light means the galaxies are young and still forming.
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