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WORLD
November 13, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Scotland Yard on Wednesday reversed a coroner's finding of foul play in the 2010 death of British spy Gareth Williams, concluding that an accident was likely responsible for the death of the code-breaker whose naked, decomposing body was found stuffed inside a zipped and padlocked gym bag. London Metropolitan Police investigators had undertaken a review of evidence in the case 16 months ago, after initial restrictions on homicide detectives' access...
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
I don't own anything close to a complete John Tavener discography. But I do have a foot-high stack of his CDs that I happened to stumble over in a closet not long ago. It got me wondering, not for the first time, what to make of the British composer who, by strange coincidence, died at 69 on Tuesday. A lot of people over the years have wondered the same thing about Tavener's numinous music, with its flamboyant, exotic spirituality. Always wanting to weed out CDs, I first looked for some that could go. A few were still in shrink wrap; would I ever listen to them?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Thomas Suh Lauder
The formula for a successful British band is simple: Grow up together in an industrial town (in this case, Manchester), wow 'em in London, win over Europe and Asia and then shred the music charts in America for the really big money. After getting tantalizingly close, the Stone Roses never made it in America, burning brightly across the pond in the late 1980s and early 1990s before famously flaming out. As the new documentary "The Stone Roses: Made of Stone" makes clear, the Roses were the Manchester band conquering Britain, Europe and Japan, more so than contemporaries Happy Mondays and the Charlatans and years before Oasis came along.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By David Ng
John Kenneth Tavener, the renowned British composer whose spiritual, religious-inspired music drew a diverse fan base that included the Beatles and Prince Charles, has died at age 69. Tavener died Tuesday at his home in Dorset, England, said his publisher, Chester Music. No cause of death was given, but Tavener had been living with Marfan syndrome, a genetic disorder that contributed to his unusual height -- he stood 6 feet, 6 inches tall -- and also weakened his heart. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 Tavener's ambitious pieces featured orchestral and choir compositions that were both haunting and emotional in nature.
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By Morgan Little
When Harold Jellicoe Percival died last month, the British World War II veteran's obituary mentioned that he had no close family to attend his funeral. But after the obituary went viral, hundreds of people showed up to honor him Monday. Percival, who served as a member of the Royal Air Force's Bomber Command, died on Oct. 25 at the age of 99. His obituary requested that “any service personnel who can attend his funeral service would be appreciated.” Its spread across social media brought it to the attention of service members and veterans organizations in Britain, They, in turn, rallied people to attend his funeral and honor his memory on Armistice Day. Mourners at Harold Percival's funeral singing Jerusalem.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
"Bridesmaids" had a lot of wild wedding moments, but even that raucous comedy didn't go where one British bride just did: She enlisted her horse to be one of her two bridesmaids. Wearing a purple bridle to match groom Graham Sales' tie, 17-year-old Toffee was one of two ladies bride Alex Wells called upon to serve on her special day, the   Daily Mail   reported Monday. And yes, the other bridesmaid, Lianna Bourne, was in purple as well - sans bridle, of course. Because that would be weird.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Ninety-eight British publishers closed their doors in the year ending August 2013. The cause? E-books and online discounts. Closures were up 42% over the previous year, according to the Guardian. The companies that folded included the 26-year-old healthcare publisher Panos London, and Evans Brothers, which published popular children's book author Enid Blyton for 30 years. During 2012, e-book sales in Britain rose by 134% to more than $346 million. While print sales still dominate the bottom line in Britain with more than $4.6 billion in sales, that total was a 1% drop from the year before.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Pasadena has changed little over the past half-century. What's new, of course, is Old Pasadena. But much of the city remains recognizably old Pasadena. That has certainly been true of the Pasadena Symphony as a bastion of tradition. It was founded in 1928, and between 1936 and 2010 it had only three music directors. All arrived having had distinguished careers and remained for a long time. Even the orchestra's home throughout those years, the Pasadena Civic Auditorium, maintained its old-Pasadena feel.
WORLD
November 3, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - She's been called the scourge of big business, and some other choice appellations. Margaret Hodge, a senior member of the British Parliament, has become well-known here for taking on the likes of Google, Starbucks and Amazon in her crusade against companies that use creative accounting methods to minimize their tax bills. As head of Parliament's high-profile Public Accounts Committee, she has presided over hearings in Britain similar to the ones in Congress this year, at which big-name executives have been forced to defend the way they set up elaborate schemes to move money around and thereby avoid taxes - all of it within the law. Hodge's blunt language in raking the companies over the coals and, some say, her theatrics have made her a colorful and oft-quoted figure.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
British food regulators' proposal to lower the minimum sugar content for what can be labeled as jam has stirred up a hyperbolic debate in Parliament that pits hidebound culinary traditionalists against those seeking to boost trade. The proposed change would allow jam makers to market their wares with as little as 50% sugar content, instead of the current mandatory 60% minimum. But the law would still leave it up to the cooks to decide whether they wanted to change their recipe or stick with the old ways.
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