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NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By Morgan Little
When Harold Jellicoe Percival died last month, the British World War II veteran's obituary mentioned that he had no close family to attend his funeral. But after the obituary went viral, hundreds of people showed up to honor him Monday. Percival, who served as a member of the Royal Air Force's Bomber Command, died on Oct. 25 at the age of 99. His obituary requested that “any service personnel who can attend his funeral service would be appreciated.” Its spread across social media brought it to the attention of service members and veterans organizations in Britain, They, in turn, rallied people to attend his funeral and honor his memory on Armistice Day. Mourners at Harold Percival's funeral singing Jerusalem.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Ninety-eight British publishers closed their doors in the year ending August 2013. The cause? E-books and online discounts. Closures were up 42% over the previous year, according to the Guardian. The companies that folded included the 26-year-old healthcare publisher Panos London, and Evans Brothers, which published popular children's book author Enid Blyton for 30 years. During 2012, e-book sales in Britain rose by 134% to more than $346 million. While print sales still dominate the bottom line in Britain with more than $4.6 billion in sales, that total was a 1% drop from the year before.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
"Bridesmaids" had a lot of wild wedding moments, but even that raucous comedy didn't go where one British bride just did: She enlisted her horse to be one of her two bridesmaids. Wearing a purple bridle to match groom Graham Sales' tie, 17-year-old Toffee was one of two ladies bride Alex Wells called upon to serve on her special day, the   Daily Mail   reported Monday. And yes, the other bridesmaid, Lianna Bourne, was in purple as well - sans bridle, of course. Because that would be weird.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Pasadena has changed little over the past half-century. What's new, of course, is Old Pasadena. But much of the city remains recognizably old Pasadena. That has certainly been true of the Pasadena Symphony as a bastion of tradition. It was founded in 1928, and between 1936 and 2010 it had only three music directors. All arrived having had distinguished careers and remained for a long time. Even the orchestra's home throughout those years, the Pasadena Civic Auditorium, maintained its old-Pasadena feel.
WORLD
November 3, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - She's been called the scourge of big business, and some other choice appellations. Margaret Hodge, a senior member of the British Parliament, has become well-known here for taking on the likes of Google, Starbucks and Amazon in her crusade against companies that use creative accounting methods to minimize their tax bills. As head of Parliament's high-profile Public Accounts Committee, she has presided over hearings in Britain similar to the ones in Congress this year, at which big-name executives have been forced to defend the way they set up elaborate schemes to move money around and thereby avoid taxes - all of it within the law. Hodge's blunt language in raking the companies over the coals and, some say, her theatrics have made her a colorful and oft-quoted figure.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
British food regulators' proposal to lower the minimum sugar content for what can be labeled as jam has stirred up a hyperbolic debate in Parliament that pits hidebound culinary traditionalists against those seeking to boost trade. The proposed change would allow jam makers to market their wares with as little as 50% sugar content, instead of the current mandatory 60% minimum. But the law would still leave it up to the cooks to decide whether they wanted to change their recipe or stick with the old ways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Anthony York
SAN FRANCISCO - Gov. Jerry Brown signed a new pact Monday to formally align California's clean energy policies with those of Oregon, Washington state and British Columbia. The agreement commits all four governments to work toward ways to put a price on carbon pollution, require the use of lower-carbon gasoline and set goals for reducing greenhouse gases across the region. The nonbinding blueprint also sets new targets for electric vehicles - aiming for 10% of all new cars and trucks in the region to be emission-free by 2016 - and calls for the construction of a bullet-train system from Canada to California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2013
Mary Finch Hoyt Press secretary to Rosalynn Carter Mary Finch Hoyt, 89, White House press secretary to former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, died Oct. 17 in Washington, according to Carter's spokeswoman Deanna Congileo. She had cancer, the Washington Post reported, citing her family. Carter said that Hoyt was a "trusted adviser and loyal friend who served the nation with honor and distinction. " During the 1968 presidential campaign, Hoyt served as press secretary to Jane Muskie, wife of Democratic vice-presidential candidate Edmund Muskie, and in 1972, she served in the same role for Eleanor McGovern, wife of Democratic presidential nominee George McGovern.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By David Ng
Sir Anthony Caro, the renowned British sculptor whose abstract creations have been hugely influential, has died. The 89-year-old artist suffered a heart attack and died on Wednesday, said the Tate Museum in London. Caro is recognized widely for helping to redefine sculpture in the 20th century, often working with steel and other industrial material to create monumental installations that broke with past traditions. His work has been exhibited in major museums and galleries around the world.
WORLD
October 24, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Portuguese prosecutors on Thursday ordered police to reopen their investigation of the 2007 disappearance of Madeleine McCann, the 3-year-old British girl who went missing from a resort in the Algarve, local and British media reported. British investigators reopened their official probe of the child's disappearance in July. After distributing computer-generated images of two men wanted for questioning, they received more than 2,400 phone calls and emails with tips and fresh leads.
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