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WORLD
October 29, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON -- A young British computer hacker has been arrested by Britain's cyber crime unit at the request of American prosecutors on charges of infiltrating U.S. government and military files, Britain's newly formed National Crime Agency announced. Lauri Love, the son of a vicar, was arrested Friday at his home in the rural village of Stradishall in the county of Suffolk, 70 miles north of London. The arrest was made public late Monday. An extradition request is expected from the United States, where Love has been indicted on one count of accessing a U.S. government computer without authorization and one count of conspiracy.
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WORLD
April 8, 2014 | By Aamera Jiwaji
British businessman Shrien Dewani has been extradited to South Africa to stand trial on murder charges in the death of his Swedish bride. His arraignment in a Western Cape High Court earlier Tuesday, where he was formally charged with the murder of his wife, Anni, could spell the start of a second emotionally wrought murder trial for South Africa, spellbound already by revelations in the case against Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius. The 28-year-old Anni and her husband were on a slum tourism trip through a Cape Town township during their 2010 honeymoon when they were carjacked at gunpoint.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1985 | From Reuters
A British soldier taking part in North Atlantic Treaty Organization training exercises was slain early Monday, and a Norwegian civilian has been charged with murder, police said. The unidentified 27-year-old Briton died of gunshot wounds a few hours after being shot in a private house in the village of Verdal, near Trondheim.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - A British businessman accused of arranging his bride's murder while on their honeymoon was put on a plane to South Africa on Monday after losing a three-year battle against being extradited to face trial. South African authorities allege that Shrien Dewani took out a contract on his wife's life almost immediately upon the couple's arrival in the country in November 2010 to celebrate their marriage. Anni Dewani, 28, was shot dead and her husband thrown out of their taxi in an apparent carjacking outside Cape Town.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | From Times wire services
Soviet and British officials today signed an agreement for the first Soviet-British space mission and announced their search for the man or woman who will become the first Briton in space. The Briton will accompany two cosmonauts to the Soviet orbiting station Mir in 1991. The mission, named Juno, will be the first manned space flight financed entirely by the private sector, project director Malcolm Magee-Brown told a Moscow news conference. The British consortium behind the trip is trying to raise $25 million to cover costs for the British astronaut's part in the mission, Magee-Brown said.
NEWS
September 23, 1986 | Associated Press
Monday was British tourist Elise Gordon-Butcher's last day in New York and she wanted to visit the United Nations, but President Reagan's security got in her way. She couldn't get anywhere near the building while Reagan was inside addressing the General Assembly, so she joined a crowd straining against police barricades across the street trying to catch a glimpse of him. Reagan, however, had slipped in a back door.
WORLD
April 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Gunmen fired on a car carrying United Nations aid workers and abducted a Briton and a Kenyan in southern Somalia, officials and witnesses said. The Briton may have been wounded in the leg. The workers' employer, the U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization, was unavailable to confirm the incident or the nationalities of the hostages.
NEWS
June 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Soviet and British officials Thursday signed an agreement for the first Soviet-British space mission and announced a search for the man or woman who will become the first Briton in space. The Briton will accompany two cosmonauts to the Soviet orbiting station Mir in 1991. Two British candidates will be selected by November. Only one will fly aboard Mir. The other will be an understudy. British Air Vice Marshal Peter Howard, in charge of astronaut selection, said candidates should be 21 to 40 years old, physically fit, have a degree in science and an aptitude for handling delicate scientific equipment.
OPINION
January 8, 1989
I read with interest two articles today (Part I, Dec. 28). One on restricting assault weapons and the other on a Briton held two years in Iran with no trial for possession of two weapons. You don't think something like that would ever happen in the United States, do you? TIM ELLIOTT North Hollywood
WORLD
June 13, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Two years ago, Britons were outraged when U.S. politicians like Sarah Palin, in the debate over healthcare reform, turned this country's National Health Service into a public whipping boy, denouncing it as "evil," "Orwellian" and generally the enemy of everything good and true. It's time for some payback. Britain is now embroiled in a healthcare argument of its own, prompted by a proposed shake-up of the NHS. And the phrase on everyone's lips is "American-style," which may not be as catchy as the "death panels" that Palin attributed to socialized medicine but which, over here, inspires pretty much the same kind of terror.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"Tomorrow they will wear another face," is how Ralph Waldo Emerson began the closing couplet of his poem "Experience. " And now, the Emerson String Quartet wears, for the first time in 34 years, another face. Founded in 1976, the year of America's bicentennial, this commandingly all-American string quartet, a national symbol of sorts, welcomes a new nationality. British cellist Paul Watkins recently replaced David Finckel. "Succession swift," the Transcendentalist poet and essayist also wrote in "Experience.
WORLD
January 4, 2014 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON -- A British power engineer found shot to death in Libya this week was officially identified Saturday. The British Foreign Office released a statement on behalf of his family identifying the victim as Mark De Salis. He had been working for the last six years as a power manager for First Engineering, a Britain-based company bringing generators to Tripoli to provide electricity. The statement said the family was “shocked and devastated to hear about Mark's death .... Mark enjoyed his work in Tripoli and like the Libyan people.
WORLD
October 29, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON -- A young British computer hacker has been arrested by Britain's cyber crime unit at the request of American prosecutors on charges of infiltrating U.S. government and military files, Britain's newly formed National Crime Agency announced. Lauri Love, the son of a vicar, was arrested Friday at his home in the rural village of Stradishall in the county of Suffolk, 70 miles north of London. The arrest was made public late Monday. An extradition request is expected from the United States, where Love has been indicted on one count of accessing a U.S. government computer without authorization and one count of conspiracy.
WORLD
July 7, 2013 | By Henry Chu and Helene Elliott
WIMBLEDON, England - There were shouted proposals of marriage from the crowd. A nervous nation glued to the television, long years of frustration suggesting that a fateful string of mistakes was right around the corner. But this time, when the last backhander hit the net, it was time to celebrate. Andy Murray's victory Sunday in the men's singles at Wimbledon was a collective dream come true for Britain, a triumph to be savored after disappointing decades when, year after year, someone else's son walked away with the title.
NATIONAL
May 16, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Disclosure of a highly classified intelligence operation in Yemen last year compromised an exceedingly rare and valuable espionage achievement: an informant who had earned the trust of hardened terrorists, according to U.S. officials. The operation received new scrutiny this week after the Justice Department disclosed it had obtained telephone records for calls to and from more than 20 lines belonging to the Associated Press news service and its journalists in April and May 2012 in a high-level investigation of the alleged leak of classified information.
WORLD
March 27, 2013 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - It was a modest proposal to ditch the humble apostrophe. Who'd've guessed it'd cause such a fuss? Not the officials in southwestern England whose idea it was to abolish the smudgy little punctuation mark from street signs. Condensing King's Crescent to Kings Crescent and turning St. Paul's Square into St. Pauls Square would help avoid "potential confusion," they said. But the proposal has stirred up a hornets' nest here in the land of the Queen's English. Unveiled this month, the suggested ban immediately sparked highly grammatical declarations of outrage and angry vows of apostrophe defense from critics throughout Britain.
NEWS
September 12, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The government announced Wednesday that it has expelled senior Newsweek correspondent Ray Wilkinson for an article he co-authored in this week's edition of the magazine. Wilkinson, 41, a Briton who is the magazine's bureau chief in Nairobi, Kenya, was on temporary assignment in South Africa. Home Affairs Minister Stoffel Botha said in a statement that a Newsweek article entitled "The Young Lions," about black anti-apartheid unrest, involved "selective reporting, half-truths and false innuendo."
NEWS
June 1, 1987 | From Reuters
Nearly 50 years ago, a lovelorn young Briton flew a light plane into the Soviet Union in search of his Russian sweetheart and apparently so moved dictator Josef Stalin that he was allowed to marry her and take her back to England. The story, some details of which were echoed in last week's flight to Moscow's Red Square by teen-aged West German pilot Mathias Rust, is recounted in memoirs published by Soviet writer Lev Sheinin in 1959.
WORLD
January 23, 2013 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Laying out a vision that could lead his country out of the European Union, Prime Minister David Cameron vowed Wednesday to negotiate a new relationship with the 27-nation trading bloc and put Britain's continued membership to a national vote. In possibly the most important speech of his premiership so far, Cameron said many of his compatriots were fed up with growing centralization of power in Brussels and that a new deal was necessary. He pledged to try to win concessions for Britain and then let voters pass judgment, by the end of 2017, in a referendum on whether they wanted to remain in the EU. A withdrawal could jeopardize Britain's access to European markets and diminish its influence on the world stage, particularly its role as a bridge to Europe for the United States.
WORLD
January 18, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - After warning his compatriots to brace themselves for “bad news,” British Prime Minister David Cameron said Friday that there were now significantly fewer than 30 Britons still caught up in the crisis in Algeria but that the country's armed forces were “still pursuing terrorists and possibly some of the hostages in other areas” of the energy plant under siege. Cameron told lawmakers that Friday morning he had spoken to his Algerian counterpart, who assured him that “they are now looking at all possible routes to resolve this crisis” after completing the first phase of their strike against the militants.
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