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OPINION
August 30, 2013
Re "Why the U.S. has to settle for low-speed data," Column, Aug. 25 Michael Hiltzik could have noted the fact that America is among the world's leaders in broadband choice, availability and quality. The U.S. is one of two nations featuring three universally available high-speed networks. Eighty-five percent of U.S. households can access wired networks capable of 100-megabit-per-second service, while only half of Europe's homes can access even 30 Mbps. Basic services here are the second most affordable among members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Meg James
The landmark deal between Comcast Corp. and Netflix Inc. resolves a simmering dispute over who will support America's growing Internet video habit. Netflix has agreed to pay Comcast for a direct connection to the cable operator's broadband networks to ensure that Netflix customers receive an uninterrupted viewing experience when streaming movies and TV shows. The agreement, which was confirmed this weekend, comes after Netflix customers complained about deteriorating service, as videos they tried to watch stuttered and stalled in midstream.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2012 | By Joe Flint
BOSTON -- Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski said he supports cable and telecommunication companies adopting a usage-based pricing plan for broadband. "Usage-based pricing could be a healthy and beneficial part of the ecosystem," Genachowski said in an appearance at the National Cable & Telecommunications Assn.'s annual convention here. Genachowski, who was interviewed by former FCC Chairman and current NCTA Chief Executive Michael Powell, added that a tiered pricing approach may "increase consumer choice and competition" and "result in lower prices for people who consume less broadband.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2014 | David Lazarus
Netflix is paying cable giant Comcast a pile of cash for what the companies say will be "no preferential network treatment. " Sure, because corporations routinely give money to one another just for the fun of it. The reality is that Netflix is handing Comcast an unspecified chunk of change, likely millions of dollars, for what they say is a "more direct connection" to the cable company's broadband network. That's preferential treatment. And that's not necessarily a bad thing.
OPINION
August 14, 2005
Re "Net losses?," editorial, Aug. 10 Once again the Federal Communications Commission has got it wrong. Its regulatory leniency has not only threatened the freedom of content for Internet users, but has all but taken away the competition that spurs innovation essential to broadband development. Instead of unbundling the "local loop" and discounting line rentals, which it should, it has taken a step in all but crushing competition. The only way out of this is for the Bush administration to further develop broadband over power lines with the the money it pledged for research and development.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2011 | By Wailin Wong
AT&T Inc. confirmed that starting May 2 it will impose a monthly data cap of 150 gigabytes on users of its DSL broadband service. Subscribers to its U-Verse service get 250 gigabytes a month. Consumers who go over this limit three times will be charged $10 for every 50 additional gigabytes of usage. The new data caps represent the latest move by an industry grappling with unabated and significant increases in bandwidth usage, fueled by online video consumption. According to the latest data from the Nielsen Co., U.S. viewers spent nearly 45% more time watching online videos in January than in the same month a year earlier.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Gigabit Squared, a start-up based in Ohio, announced it would bring gigabit broadband speeds to six communities across the country through a new program that has secured $200 million in funding. The Gigabit Neighborhood Gateway Program will be in partnership with Gig.U, a group of more than 30 research universities across the country, and will bring the select communities Internet speeds "from 100 to 1,000 times faster than what Americans have today," according to a statement released Wednesday.  "To see Gigabit Squared emerge so strongly today proves that yes, America needs an upgrade; and that yes, there are innovators and investors willing to step up to get it done,” said Blair Levin, executive director of Gig.U.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn
Google Inc.'s announcement last month that it would build a high-speed broadband network set off fierce competition among 600 communities, the Internet powerhouse said in a blog post Friday. Google hasn't been specific about the criteria in selecting which community will get the experimental fiber optic hookup, simply saying it wants to increase Internet access and spur competition. The service would offer connection speeds of 1 gigabit per second -- 100 times faster than many high-speed home connections, the company said.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn and Tiffany Hsu
In an ambitious bid to revolutionize how consumers use the Internet, technology giant Google Inc. says it will build a network that would be 100 times faster than what is available for many users today. Entering territory tightly controlled by telecommunications carriers, Google announced Wednesday that it would build and test an experimental high-speed fiber optic network that could be available in several communities and reach as many as 500,000 people. The service could be available as early as next year, an analyst said.
OPINION
February 17, 2002 | DAVID FRIEDMAN
Even as the Enron and Global Crossing bankruptcies further expose the spectacular waste fostered by the 1990s' Information Age bubble, an army of lobbyists in Washington is fighting to secure government support for broadband communications, the "next wave" of the "new economy." Subsidizing an ultra-fast Internet, it's said, will energize everything, from the stock market to our democracy itself. But if the unbalanced, profligate economy of the '90s has taught us anything, it should be the danger of granting any one sector, no matter how appealing, special political favor.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Dawn C. Chmielewski
WASHINGTON - Beaten back twice by the courts, the nation's top communications regulator will make a last-ditch attempt to craft rules aimed at ensuring the Internet remains open and free of interference from a rapidly consolidating broadband industry. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler, moving quickly after a court tossed out most of the agency's so-called net neutrality rules last month, started a new effort Wednesday to recraft regulations that advocates say would form the cornerstone for future broadband and pay-TV service.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Comcast executives downplayed speculation that it was near a deal with Netflix to add the streaming service to its cable set-top boxes. On a conference call with analysts to discuss the cable and programming giant's third-quarter results, Comcast Cable President Neil Smits dismissed the flurry of recent media reports that a groundbreaking agreement to add a Netflix app to its set-top boxes was in the works. "It is incredible to me the amount of press coverage this has received," Smits said, adding that there is "nothing to report" and that a Neflix app on set-top boxes is "not really a high priority for us. " Smits noted that Comcast customers already have many ways to access Netflix.
OPINION
August 30, 2013
Re "Why the U.S. has to settle for low-speed data," Column, Aug. 25 Michael Hiltzik could have noted the fact that America is among the world's leaders in broadband choice, availability and quality. The U.S. is one of two nations featuring three universally available high-speed networks. Eighty-five percent of U.S. households can access wired networks capable of 100-megabit-per-second service, while only half of Europe's homes can access even 30 Mbps. Basic services here are the second most affordable among members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
While a growing percentage of U.S. adults at least occasionally use the Internet, many rely on mobile devices to do so and a steady 3% of adults continue to have dial-up connections at home. The findings from the latest round of a tracking survey by Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project show that the percentage of adults who don't use the Internet has been cut in half during the past five years, from 30% to 15%. During that span, much of the growth appears to have come from people accessing the Internet from smartphones and tablets and computers at work.
OPINION
July 25, 2013
Re "America's broadband blues," July 23 Harold Feld fails to deliver much analytic value. Instead of attacking my New York Times opinion piece as Pollyanna advocacy because he doesn't approve of the facts, Feld should digest the impact that changing circumstances have on Internet policy. Independent research finds that broadband is now available to more than 99% of U.S. homes, and the speed of U.S. broadband networks is improving rapidly: While they were 22nd worldwide in 2009, they're now 8th and rising.
OPINION
July 23, 2013 | By Harold Feld
Over the last year, America's broadband report card, in my estimation, has gone from a D to a C-. Although the U.S. has definitely shown signs of improvement in high-speed Internet access, the achievements have been mostly in mobile broadband, not the wired broadband we need for children everywhere to reliably access their homework, for towns to keep and attract jobs, and to generally support a 21st century digital economy and a modern education system....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2012 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
Here on the shoulder of the information superhighway, smartphones turn stupid, streaming videos shrink to a trickle and a simple download drags like a flat tire. Darwin is a former mining town cloistered in the high desert mountains between Death Valley National Park and the China Lake naval weapons testing center. Finding it isn't easy - a sign that marked the turnoff from California Highway 190 was stolen recently. In Darwin, there is no food, gas or lodging - or any businesses, for that matter.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2010
By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times The Federal Communications Commission has come up with a new way to apply some network neutrality rules that would force Comcast Corp., AT&T Inc. and other broadband Internet service providers to handle all Web traffic the same, without imposing limits on users or blocking websites. The proposal is aimed at blunting an April federal appeals court ruling involving Comcast that found that the agency had limited authority to regulate broadband Internet service.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2013 | By Joe Flint
WASHINGTON -- The cable industry's top lobbyist defended broadband in the United States against complaints that the country has fallen behind others in terms of speed and innovation. "America is home to the world's very best Internet companies," said Michael Powell, chief executive of the National Cable & Telecommunications Assn. at the lobbying group's annual convention here. "We have worked hard to reach everyone, and now offer service to 93% of American homes. " Comparisons to other countries, Powell said, are not fair.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Don't count on being able to subscribe to Time Warner's HBO as a stand-alone service anytime soon. Speaking to analysts on an earnings call for its first-quarter results, Time Warner Chief Executive Jeff Bewkes threw cold water on the idea that it might offer HBO to consumers via broadband without having to subscribe to a larger cable or satellite TV package first. "We don't think it makes sense," Bewkes said, adding that the target market is "not significantly large enough to be attractive at this point.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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