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BUSINESS
December 2, 2010 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Verizon Wireless said Wednesday that it would turn on its 4G wireless network Sunday in 38 U.S. cities, though the new network will not support smart phones until the first half of 2011. Instead, the 4G network ? which the company says is up to 10 times faster than the current 3G network ? will initially be accessible only with USB modems from LG Electronics Inc. and Pantech Corp. The devices, which users can plug into their laptops to tap into 4G speeds on the go, will cost $99 after a $50 rebate and a two-year data contract.
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OPINION
October 20, 2010
A rancorous dispute between News Corp. and Cablevision has baseball fans in Long Island missing more playoff pitches than Alex Rodriguez. News Corp. has barred Cablevision from carrying its television programming, including the baseball playoff broadcasts from Fox TV stations in New York and Philadelphia, unless Cablevision pays significantly higher fees. The company even barred Cablevision's broadband subscribers from watching Fox programs from News Corp. outlets online for several hours on Saturday.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Row 44 Inc., which provides broadband Internet connections for airline passengers, plans to announce Wednesday that it has raised $37 million from investors, enabling the company to offer the service on international flights. With the funds, Row 44 plans to expand its coverage to other regions of the world by leasing more satellite transponders. The company, whose only customer is Southwest Airlines, hopes to persuade international carriers to outfit their planes with Row 44 equipment that gives passengers Wi-Fi connections while flying.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2010 | By Jennifer Martinez, Tribune Washington Bureau
Andrew McLaughlin built Google Inc.'s public policy operation and helped craft its government lobbying strategy. Now he works for the White House on Internet policy — and that has some Google rivals crying foul as federal officials prepare to rewrite the rules governing high-speed Internet. The so-called net neutrality rules expected to be issued by the Federal Communications Commission are seen as a boon to Google by limiting the ability of high-speed Internet service providers, such as phone and cable companies, to steer users to their own content.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2010 | By Jennifer Martinez, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Federal Communications Commission voted Thursday to start the controversial process of reclassifying high-speed Internet access to give the agency more authority over service providers to prevent disparate treatment of customers. The commission voted 3-2 along party lines to put out for public comment a new regulatory framework, dubbed the Third Way, that would make Internet service providers subject to some of the same nondiscrimination rules that apply to telephone companies.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Federal regulators want to know just how fast you're surfing, and they're looking for 10,000 volunteers to submit to a speed check. Four out of five high-speed Internet users don't know how fast their home connections are, according to a survey released Tuesday by the Federal Communications Commission. That leaves those consumers unsure whether they're getting what they're paying for, and it hinders them in shopping for better service from competing Internet service providers, agency officials said.
OPINION
May 7, 2010
Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski's proposal Thursday to give his agency rulemaking power over broadband Internet access services sent some telecommunications industry allies — and even some FCC members — into apoplexy. The move would kill innovation! It would stifle investment! The critics' bromides notwithstanding, Genachowski's approach is hardly a frontal assault on the Net. It's a reasonable attempt to apply narrow rules to a part of the Internet where there's insufficient competition: broadband access services.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
The Federal Communications Commission has come up with a new way to apply some net neutrality rules that would force Comcast Corp., AT&T Inc. and other broadband Internet service providers to handle all Web traffic the same, without imposing limits on users or blocking websites. Its proposal released Thursday is aimed at blunting an April federal appeals court ruling involving Comcast that found the agency had limited authority to regulate broadband Internet service. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said in a statement that the Comcast decision had created a "serious problem" and that his agency believes more regulation of broadband Internet service is needed, though not the heavier restrictions that apply to telephone companies.
OPINION
April 13, 2010
Faced with a pandemic of online piracy, Hollywood studios and the major record labels have pressed governments around the world to make it easier for them to enforce their copyrights. In particular, they've tried to shift responsibility for infringements from the individuals who commit them -- who are legion and hard to identify -- to targets that are easier to hit. And gradually, they have been succeeding. The latest example is a hotly disputed British law that sets new rules for digital broadcasting and the Internet.
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