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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1999 | From ASSOCIATED PRESS
"Nova," PBS' science news program, won the highest honor at the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards for broadcast journalism. Columbia University President George Rupp said that "Nova," winner of the Gold Baton award, "brings us elegant photography, thorough research, often suspense and always good reporting--to teach us about our world."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Larry Gordon and Daniel Miller
Television news anchor Willow Bay, a veteran of ABC, CNN and Bloomberg TV, will be the next director of USC's School of Journalism, campus officials announced Wednesday. Bay's experience is expected to help the school emphasize online and television journalism. Her two predecessors worked in newspapers. Bay's selection concludes a lengthy search that was marred last year when the previously announced choice, a Northwestern University professor, turned down the USC job two days after accepting it. Bay, 50, is a senior editor at Huffington Post and a special correspondent and host for Bloomberg TV. She has co-anchored ABC's "Good Morning America/Sunday" and CNN's "Moneyline News Hour," and was the lead writer and producer of CNN's weekend news program "Pinnacle.
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NEWS
May 11, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pauline Frederick, a pioneering broadcast journalist who helped open radio and television newsrooms to other women, has died. Miss Frederick, who was 84, died Wednesday after a heart attack in the Chicago suburb of Lake Forest, where she had been visiting relatives. "She was the first full-fledged woman correspondent and opened doors for women's acceptance in television and radio journalism," said Beryl Pfizer, a news producer at NBC who had worked with Frederick.
SPORTS
November 9, 2013 | Helene Elliott
Scott Niedermayer glided into the Hockey Hall of Fame as smoothly and surely as he skated around NHL rinks through 1,263 games over parts of 18 seasons. Niedermayer's skates seemed to be extensions of his feet, so gracefully did he move when he brought the puck up ice or patrolled his position on defense. He won just about everything there is to win at every level of hockey - including four Stanley Cup championships, the last in 2007 alongside his brother, Rob - and his election to the Hall of Fame was a certainty in his first year of eligibility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1998 | K.A. MUSTON, Muston is a North Hollywood playwright who is working on his first novel
I don't wish to toot my own horn but I can save Western civilization from doom. Well, not all of Western civilization. Just the broadcast journalism component. But, hey, it's a start. My views are based on a personal version of reality formed while watching the media dismember the president over the past six years. Broadcast journalism, once the domain of giants who saw news as essential to democracy, now appears to be ruled by coiffed correspondents who rush about in pancake makeup.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Frontline," PBS' news-documentary series, won top honors Thursday in the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards for excellence in broadcast journalism. And the major PBS affiliate in Los Angeles, KCET Channel 28, won an award for two reports on medical issues. News coverage of the Tian An Men Square uprising in China last June dominated the network television prizes, with ABC, CBS and CNN all winning awards for reports on the tumultuous event.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2010 | By Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times, Part one of three
Reporting from the Northern Neck of Virginia My father's family landed in 1942 Los Angeles as if by immaculate conception, unburdened by any past. Growing up, I knew all about how my mother's grandparents came to California from southern France and Sweden. But my dad's side was a mystery. All I heard were a few stories about my grandfather as a youth in Hannibal, Mo., how he found a tarantula in a shipment of bananas at his dad's corner store, how he and a friend once rode motorcycles out west.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Broadcast's Best: ABC News' Peter Jennings will host the 50th annual Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards in broadcast journalism on Jan. 30 in New York. The ceremonies will be broadcast on PBS. Presenters include Peter Arnett from CNN, Ed Bradley from CBS, Judy Woodruff from PBS and Jane Pauley from NBC. Silver Baton winners will be chosen from 600 entries from small, medium and major market TV stations, networks, cable, independent producers and radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Bill Moyers, the feisty Southern interviewer who has made a career of incisive questioning, has been awarded broadcast journalism's top prize, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Gold Baton. Moyers got the award for his more than 20 years in broadcasting, but several programs from last season were specially cited by the jury. His "High Crimes and Misdemeanors," a 90-minute report that examined the Iran-Contra story on the PBS series "Frontline," won a silver baton of its own.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Greg Braxton
KCET Vice President of News and Public Affairs Val Zavala and KNBC investigative reporter Joel Grover will be presented with the Bill Stout Memorial Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism by an advocacy organization chaired by former Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan. Community Advocates Inc. will honor the two journalists Nov. 15 at the Taper Auditorium of the Riordan Central Library in downtown Los Angeles. KNBC's Fritz Coleman will serve as master of cemeonies for the event, which is free and open to the public (RSVPs are required)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012 | Meg James
The death of CBS News' pit-bull reporter Mike Wallace marks not only the passing of a broadcast lion but in many ways also the brand of journalism he helped to define. Wallace, 93, died late Saturday at a care center in New Canaan, Conn., where he had been staying for the last few years. CBS plans an hourlong tribute to Wallace and his career on "60 Minutes" next Sunday. In announcing his death, CBS lauded the brazen tactics that it said had made Wallace a household name "synonymous with the tough interview -- a style he practically invented for television more than half a century ago. " "All of us at CBS News and particularly at '60 Minutes' owe so much to Mike," Jeff Fager, chairman of CBS News and a longtime executive producer of "60 Minutes," said in a statement released Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Luis J. Rodríguez has been called "a superhero in Chicano literature" for his steady output of poems, fiction and above all for "Always Running," his classic 1993 memoir about jettisoning his former life as an East L.A. gangbanger. The Dalai Lama once praised him as an "unsung hero of compassion. " His old friend John Densmore, drummer for the Doors, describes him as a curandero, the term for a traditional Mexican healer who ministers to his community's wounds. But over lunch recently in a northeast San Fernando Valley strip mall, Rodríguez offered a far more mixed self-appraisal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2010 | By Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times, Part one of three
Reporting from the Northern Neck of Virginia My father's family landed in 1942 Los Angeles as if by immaculate conception, unburdened by any past. Growing up, I knew all about how my mother's grandparents came to California from southern France and Sweden. But my dad's side was a mystery. All I heard were a few stories about my grandfather as a youth in Hannibal, Mo., how he found a tarantula in a shipment of bananas at his dad's corner store, how he and a friend once rode motorcycles out west.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2007 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
JOURNALISM is hardly the first American institution to suffer a kind of collective nervous breakdown when confronted with radical and, mainly, unforeseen changes in technology and economics. It is, however, the first to do so having elevated communal self-absorption to an exquisitely neurasthenic pitch. You can't spit these days without hitting a media critic or columnist or some review or chat show that purports to take the pulse of the anxious news media.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2002 | By Times Staff Writers
For generations of local news viewers, Jerry Dunphy was the familiar and authoritative newsman who began each newscast with a warm smile and his trademark greeting, "From the desert to the sea to all of Southern California." But for numerous colleagues who worked with him during the last four decades in his stints at various stations, Dunphy was a dedicated newsman secure in his standing as the elder statesman of local TV news.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
From the "Or he could be a game show host" file: If either President Ronald Reagan or his successor pardons former Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North, he can look forward to a successful career as a broadcast journalist, according to William Morris agent Norman Brokaw. "We could do for Ollie what we've done for Fawn (Hall)," Brokaw said in an interview with Parade magazine editor Lloyd Shearer. "We could get him started writing his autobiography. We could book him on the lecture circuit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1987
Terry Bales, chairman of the telecommunications-journalism department at Rancho Santiago College, has been named "Distinguished Broadcast Advisor for 1987" by the national College Media Advisors Assn. Bales received his award, the first of its kind given for broadcast journalism, at the association's national conference Nov. 1 in St. Louis. Bales' responsibilities include the "Around and About Orange County" television news program produced at Rancho Santiago College.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Hollywood Foreign Press Assn.'s Golden Globe Awards are the big event of the weekend with such films as "The Talented Mr. Ripley," "The Insider" and "American Beauty" leading the nominations. But Hollywood won't be the only one taking home prizes, with journalists also in the spotlight. Jeff Greenfield, the co-anchor of CNN's "The World Today," hosts the 58th annual "Alfred I.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1999 | From ASSOCIATED PRESS
"Nova," PBS' science news program, won the highest honor at the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards for broadcast journalism. Columbia University President George Rupp said that "Nova," winner of the Gold Baton award, "brings us elegant photography, thorough research, often suspense and always good reporting--to teach us about our world."
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