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Broadcast Rights

SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | LARRY STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The XFL's first weekend was a ratings success but not an artistic one as television critics across the country bashed the fledgling professional football league and its business and broadcast partner, NBC. Some didn't like the quality of play, some didn't like the camera angles, some didn't like the cheerleaders, some didn't like commentator Jesse Ventura, and many didn't like the crassness of it all.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Docudramas about sensational crimes are good box office. So a Los Angeles production company hopes to make a TV movie about a grisly 1986 murder case in which 14-year-old Shaun Quillette was bludgeoned to death with a baseball bat by classmate Rod Matthews in Canton, Mass. Shaun's mother, Jeanne Quinn, is bitterly against a movie being made. Given TV's spotty record concerning accuracy in docudramas, her fear of Shaun being victimized a second time--by scriptwriters--is understandable.
SPORTS
August 8, 1998 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER and HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fox Broadcasting Co. is leaning toward making a counteroffer to the Walt Disney Co.'s bid for television rights to NHL games, in an effort to at least drive up the costs that its archrival will have to pay. Earlier this week, Disney made a $600-million bid for five years of exclusive coverage on its ABC broadcast network and its ESPN cable channels. The offer is nearly three times what Fox and ESPN pay under their current contracts with the NHL, which expire at the end of the 1998-99 season.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Yielding to complaints from broadcasters and some church leaders, Roman Catholic Church officials in Monterey on Thursday dropped a controversial plan to auction television rights for coverage of September's visit by Pope John Paul II. The Diocese of Monterey's offer to sell live coverage rights and favorable booth locations during the Pope's outdoor Mass had set off an uproar among broadcasters and unsettled national church leaders who are planning the Pope's nine-city tour.
SPORTS
July 3, 1990 | Associated Press
NBC said Monday that it will not bid for U.S. television rights for the 1994 World Cup, the first world soccer championship to be played in the United States. Dick Ebersol, president of NBC Sports, also predicted that ABC and CBS would decline to bid for rights to the monthlong tournament. "Given the ratings, I don't think anyone will go for it," Ebersol said while at Wimbledon to watch the tennis championships.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC has acquired the television rights to "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" and its first sequel from Warner Bros., in a deal estimated to be worth nearly $140million--an amount that could establish a new record, according to the companies and sources close to the deal. The Walt Disney Co.
SPORTS
July 3, 1993 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mighty Ducks' first home game will be among 20 games that will be broadcast by KCAL-TV (Channel 9) during the team's first NHL season, the team and station announced Friday. The agreement, which also includes road games, had been long anticipated because KCAL is a Disney Co. cousin of the Mighty Ducks.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As expected, NBC will lose as much as $100 million on its broadcast of the Summer Olympics in Barcelona, which conclude this weekend. But experts still foresee a bidding war for rights to the 1996 Games in Atlanta, with the participants including cable mogul Ted Turner. Experts say NBC's problems were exacerbated by its unsuccessful pay-per-view Triplecast, with sales reaching only 10% of projections.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1993 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NBC raised eyebrows by agreeing to pay a record-setting $456 million for the rights to broadcast the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, after losing money on the 1992 games. But the network on Wednesday said it can still come out a winner if the lackluster advertising climate improves. "It's entirely conceivable there could be $600 million in gross advertising revenues," said a confident NBC Sports President Dick Ebersol. "We'll make a profit on it."
SPORTS
August 21, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The National Hockey League's Board of Governors approved a five-year, $600-million contract with Disney-owned ABC, ESPN and ESPN2 on Thursday for exclusive broadcast and cable-TV rights starting with the 1999-2000 season. That signaled an imminent end to the NHL's brief and bumpy relationship with the Fox Broadcasting Co. The NHL's five-year, $155-million agreement with Fox for broadcast rights has one season left.
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