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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The Department of Justice is siding with broadcasters in their legal fight against Aereo, the start-up service that streams local television signals to consumers via the Internet. In a brief filed at the Supreme Court on Monday afternoon, the department said Aereo is "clearly infringing" on the copyrights of the broadcasters whose content it is streaming without permission, and said a lower court ruling declaring the service legal should be reversed. Launched in 2012 and available in 13 markets, Aereo plucks the signals of broadcasters and transmits them to the Internet via tiny antennae.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014
Sandy Grossman, 78, a television sports director who oversaw broadcasts of a record 10 Super Bowls and introduced several innovations to TV sports coverage, died Wednesday of cancer at his home in Boca Raton, Fla., according to his son Dean. Grossman won eight Emmys for his work in a career that spanned more than four decades. From early on, he sought to not just cover the action, but also humanize sports matches by concentrating on individuals. "A good football broadcast should be like a good novel," Grossman said in a 1980 Los Angeles Times interview.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The nation's biggest television companies including ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox are asking the Supreme Court to shut down Aereo Inc., a startup distribution service that they view as a threat to their business. Launched in 2012 and available in a handful of markets including New York City, Aereo transmits the signals of local broadcast stations to consumers via the Internet. Aereo charges its subscribers between $8 and $12 a month for the service, which includes a small antenna to receive the signals and access to a cloud-based digital video recorder that can hold up to 40 hours of programming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Larry Gordon and Daniel Miller
Television news anchor Willow Bay, a veteran of ABC, CNN and Bloomberg TV, will be the next director of USC's School of Journalism, campus officials announced Wednesday. Bay's experience is expected to help the school emphasize online and television journalism. Her two predecessors worked in newspapers. Bay's selection concludes a lengthy search that was marred last year when the previously announced choice, a Northwestern University professor, turned down the USC job two days after accepting it. Bay, 50, is a senior editor at Huffington Post and a special correspondent and host for Bloomberg TV. She has co-anchored ABC's "Good Morning America/Sunday" and CNN's "Moneyline News Hour," and was the lead writer and producer of CNN's weekend news program "Pinnacle.
SPORTS
October 12, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
ST. LOUIS -- The Dodgers do not plan to bring Steve Lyons and Eric Collins back to their broadcast team next year. Lyons had worked on the Dodgers' television broadcasts for nine years, most recently as an analyst on road games and on pregame and postgame shows. Collins, with the Dodgers for five years, had served as the play-by-play voice on televised games outside California and Arizona -- that is, the games to which Vin Scully did not travel. Lyons, a former major leaguer, announced news of his dismissal on Saturday via Twitter.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Anyone can go to their local television station and ask to see how much candidates paid for political advertisements. Now, the Federal Communications Commission wants to put that information online for everyone to see. Entertainment reporter Joe Flint says broadcasters aren't happy about that. He explains why in this video. The FCC is voting on the proposal Friday.   ALSO: Fed upgrades economic outlook Economy adds more jobs, but are they good jobs?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Two of the nation's preeminent legal experts on copyright law are siding with broadcasters in their legal fight against Aereo, a start-up service that transmits local television signals via the Internet. In a brief filed at the Supreme Court, UCLA School of Law professor David Nimmer and Peter Menell, a professor at the UC Berkeley School of Law, warned that if Aereo were found to be legal it could "decimate multiple industries. " The broadcasters are hoping that the high court will overturn last year's 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York ruling that found Aereo's transmissions and recordings are not "public performances" of copyrighted material.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Aereo, a media company that distributes broadcast programming via the Internet, survived a major legal challenge to its business from CBS, NBC, ABC, Fox and other broadcasters. In a 2-1 decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York ruled that Aereo's transmissions and recordings of broadcast programming are not "public performances" of copyrighted material and added that the broadcasters "have not demonstrated that they are likely to prevail on the merits on this claim in their copyright infringement action.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Aereo, a media company that offers broadcast programming via the Internet, scored a victory in what promises to be a long legal battle with CBS, NBC, ABC, Fox and other broadcasters. On Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Alison Nathan of the Southern District of New York denied a request from a coalition of broadcasters seeking a preliminary injunction against Aereo, which launched last spring in New York City. The broadcasters are arguing that Aereo's retransmission of their signals is a violation of copyright law. Aereo, whose backers include media mogul Barry Diller, is a distribution service that provides access to broadcast TV signals via smartphones, tablets and Internet-friendly TVs. Aereo provides a tiny antenna that can pick up the signals of broadcasters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Cablevision Systems Corp., a New York-based cable operator, blasted the arguments made by broadcasters in a Supreme Court filing seeking to shut down Aereo, a start-up company that delivers local television station signals to consumers via the Internet. In a statement, Cablevision said the case that broadcasters including Fox, CBS, ABC and NBC are attempting to make against Aereo is a "willful attempt to stifle innovation. " Specifically, Cablevision is concerned about remarks in the filing regarding its own remote digital video recording service, which also beat back legal challenges when it was first introduced.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Last month, after years of futile goose-chasing, Mexican authorities captured the country's most-wanted criminal, the powerful Sinaloa drug cartel boss Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán. But another legendary Mexican desperado remains at large after 40 years, haunting the fantasies of an adoring public. She's Camelia la Texana, a comely San Antonio ingenue turned drug-smuggling queen who shot and killed her lover in a jealous rage. At least that's her story as immortalized in "Contrabando y Traición" ("Contraband and Betrayal")
SPORTS
March 13, 2014 | By Helene Elliott
After more than two decades as the analyst on Kings telecasts, Jim Fox is probably better known for his fine work in breaking down plays and providing context over the air than he is for his 10-year playing career with the Kings. “I do run into a lot of people who don't know that I played. And they watch me on TV. But I'm used to it by now,” he said. “When Wayne Gretzky came, that's when the spotlight shone on the Kings and I was part of that for a year or two. In all honesty, you go back to Canada and people are there all the time with hockey cards, even today.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The Federal Communication Commission's efforts to apply stricter oversight of partnerships between local television stations has created tensions inside the regulatory agency and with broadcasters. On Wednesday, the FCC's Mass Media Bureau issued a public notice saying it would "closely scrutinize" applications from television stations seeking to enter joint sales agreements or local marketing agreements. Such arrangements have become commonplace in the industry. Typically, a strong station partners with a weaker station on ad sales and/or other operations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before confessing that I invented Bitcoin. The Skinny: My Sunday TV viewing is going to get more complicated. I'm already juggling "The Walking Dead," "Girls," "True Detective" and "The Good Wife. " Now ABC is adding "Resurrection" to the mix. I really liked the pilot and hope the series can deliver. Today's roundup includes the weekend box office preview. Also the FCC is working on new rules for local TV, and Disney makes big cuts at its interactive unit.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Pay-TV distributors and public interest groups cheered news that the Federal Communications Commission is considering new regulations for local television stations. Specifically, the FCC is expected to vote on March 31 to prohibit separately owned television stations from teaming up to negotiate distribution deals with pay-TV companies. The practice has become commonplace in the last several years because of an increase the number of operating partnerships between local television stations known as joint sales agreements or shared service agreements.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - Local television stations would face tougher rules prohibiting them from joining together to sell advertising and to negotiate with cable companies under a plan by the nation's top communications regulator. The proposals on joint sales and joint negotiations were unveiled Thursday as the Federal Communications Commission prepared to start another broad review of its media ownership rules. "Collectively, these actions will not only preserve values like competition, diversity and localism, they are simply the right thing to do," FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
News of Osama bin Laden's death broke in Israel on Holocaust Remembrance Day, a holiday when broadcasters and news sites typically go silent. Yet most broke with tradition to cover the story. Photo gallery: Reactions to Osama bin Laden death Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said in a statement, "This is a resounding victory for justice, freedom and the common values of all democracies that are resolutely fighting shoulder to shoulder against terrorism. " President Shimon Peres said, "Bin Laden was one of the biggest murderers in history and he received his sentence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The practice of competing local television stations sharing resources needs tougher regulations, the Justice Department warned Friday. In a filing to the Federal Communications Commission, the department said agreements between local television stations to partner on business and editorial operations "often confer influence or control of one broadcast competitor over another. " It added that that such arrangements can also allow broadcasters to circumvent the FCC's rules limiting the number of television stations one company can own. Known in the television industry as joint sales agreements, shared service agreements or local news service agreements, such arrangements have become commonplace, particularly in small and midsize markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Two of the nation's preeminent legal experts on copyright law are siding with broadcasters in their legal fight against Aereo, a start-up service that transmits local television signals via the Internet. In a brief filed at the Supreme Court, UCLA School of Law professor David Nimmer and Peter Menell, a professor at the UC Berkeley School of Law, warned that if Aereo were found to be legal it could "decimate multiple industries. " The broadcasters are hoping that the high court will overturn last year's 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York ruling that found Aereo's transmissions and recordings are not "public performances" of copyrighted material.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The Department of Justice is siding with broadcasters in their legal fight against Aereo, the start-up service that streams local television signals to consumers via the Internet. In a brief filed at the Supreme Court on Monday afternoon, the department said Aereo is "clearly infringing" on the copyrights of the broadcasters whose content it is streaming without permission, and said a lower court ruling declaring the service legal should be reversed. Launched in 2012 and available in 13 markets, Aereo plucks the signals of broadcasters and transmits them to the Internet via tiny antennae.
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