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April 26, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Anyone can go to their local television station and ask to see how much candidates paid for political advertisements. Now, the Federal Communications Commission wants to put that information online for everyone to see. Entertainment reporter Joe Flint says broadcasters aren't happy about that. He explains why in this video. The FCC is voting on the proposal Friday.   ALSO: Fed upgrades economic outlook Economy adds more jobs, but are they good jobs?
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BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court justices sounded uncertain and conflicted Tuesday in trying to decide whether a TV streaming service that allows users to receive their favorite programs through tiny, rented antennas violates the broadcasters' copyrights. The case of ABC vs. Aereo has the potential to reshape the broadcast and cable industries if the Brooklyn-based upstart prevails in the high court. And that appeared possible after Tuesday's argument. An attorney for the broadcasting industry urged the court to shut down Aereo.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2013 | By Joe Flint
The nation's biggest television companies including ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox are asking the Supreme Court to shut down Aereo Inc., a startup distribution service that they view as a threat to their business. Launched in 2012 and available in a handful of markets including New York City, Aereo transmits the signals of local broadcast stations to consumers via the Internet. Aereo charges its subscribers between $8 and $12 a month for the service, which includes a small antenna to receive the signals and access to a cloud-based digital video recorder that can hold up to 40 hours of programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Joe Flint
It is about the size of a dime and light as a feather. But in the eyes of the broadcast television industry, an Aereo antenna might as well be a hundred feet tall and weigh a thousand pounds. The big networks claim it is illegal and could destroy everything they hold dear. On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments from both sides, and the results could have major implications for the future of television. Launched in 2012 by Chaitanya "Chet" Kanojia, an Indian-born engineer with 14 patents, Aereo enables consumers to stream and record on the Internet the over-the-air signals of local broadcasters via remotely stored antennas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Aereo, a media company that offers broadcast programming via the Internet, scored a victory in what promises to be a long legal battle with CBS, NBC, ABC, Fox and other broadcasters. On Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Alison Nathan of the Southern District of New York denied a request from a coalition of broadcasters seeking a preliminary injunction against Aereo, which launched last spring in New York City. The broadcasters are arguing that Aereo's retransmission of their signals is a violation of copyright law. Aereo, whose backers include media mogul Barry Diller, is a distribution service that provides access to broadcast TV signals via smartphones, tablets and Internet-friendly TVs. Aereo provides a tiny antenna that can pick up the signals of broadcasters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Aereo, a media company that distributes broadcast programming via the Internet, survived a major legal challenge to its business from CBS, NBC, ABC, Fox and other broadcasters. In a 2-1 decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York ruled that Aereo's transmissions and recordings of broadcast programming are not "public performances" of copyrighted material and added that the broadcasters "have not demonstrated that they are likely to prevail on the merits on this claim in their copyright infringement action.
SPORTS
October 12, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
ST. LOUIS -- The Dodgers do not plan to bring Steve Lyons and Eric Collins back to their broadcast team next year. Lyons had worked on the Dodgers' television broadcasts for nine years, most recently as an analyst on road games and on pregame and postgame shows. Collins, with the Dodgers for five years, had served as the play-by-play voice on televised games outside California and Arizona -- that is, the games to which Vin Scully did not travel. Lyons, a former major leaguer, announced news of his dismissal on Saturday via Twitter.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Two of the nation's preeminent legal experts on copyright law are siding with broadcasters in their legal fight against Aereo, a start-up service that transmits local television signals via the Internet. In a brief filed at the Supreme Court, UCLA School of Law professor David Nimmer and Peter Menell, a professor at the UC Berkeley School of Law, warned that if Aereo were found to be legal it could "decimate multiple industries. " The broadcasters are hoping that the high court will overturn last year's 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York ruling that found Aereo's transmissions and recordings are not "public performances" of copyrighted material.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
News of Osama bin Laden's death broke in Israel on Holocaust Remembrance Day, a holiday when broadcasters and news sites typically go silent. Yet most broke with tradition to cover the story. Photo gallery: Reactions to Osama bin Laden death Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said in a statement, "This is a resounding victory for justice, freedom and the common values of all democracies that are resolutely fighting shoulder to shoulder against terrorism. " President Shimon Peres said, "Bin Laden was one of the biggest murderers in history and he received his sentence.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Cablevision Systems Corp., a New York-based cable operator, blasted the arguments made by broadcasters in a Supreme Court filing seeking to shut down Aereo, a start-up company that delivers local television station signals to consumers via the Internet. In a statement, Cablevision said the case that broadcasters including Fox, CBS, ABC and NBC are attempting to make against Aereo is a "willful attempt to stifle innovation. " Specifically, Cablevision is concerned about remarks in the filing regarding its own remote digital video recording service, which also beat back legal challenges when it was first introduced.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Confronting a case that could reshape the television broadcast industry, Supreme Court justices sounded conflicted Tuesday over whether an upstart streaming service is violating copyright laws by enabling subscribers to record programs captured over the air and view them later on the Internet. The court's ruling, due by June, could either shut down New York-based Aereo or clear the way for the growing company to continue providing subscribers with a convenient, low-cost way to watch local broadcast channels without paying for cable or satellite service or putting an antenna on a roof.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Jon Healey
The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments Tuesday in the most important copyright case of the year, and possibly the most important one since it took up file-sharing piracy in MGM vs. Grokster. The new case, ABC vs. Aereo , tests the reach of a key monopoly held by copyright owners: the rights to the "public performance" of their works. On the surface, this case is a slam dunk for ABC and the other broadcasters that brought the lawsuit. Aereo sells a subscription TV service that provides consumers access to their city's local broadcast channels via the Internet, enabling its customers to watch live or recorded shows on their tablets, smartphones, laptops or smart TVs. That's a truncated version of cable, and Congress made clear in 1976 that cable companies have to get broadcasters' permission before retransmitting their programs to the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Joe Flint, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
There will be no tie in the Supreme Court battle of Aereo vs. the broadcasters. Supreme Court Justice Samuel A. Alito, who previously had recused himself from participating in the case, will take part in it after all, according to SCOTUS Blog , which tracks the Supreme Court. Oral arguments in the case are scheduled for next week. Alito had given no reason for recusing himself from the case, but one possible reason is that a justice or his family has stock in some of the companies involved in the dispute.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before hopping a plane back to L.A.  The Skinny: I'm on the East Coast right now so the blood moon happened past my bedtime. The pictures looked cool though. I survived my Seder. Now I just need to burn off the meal and hope the rain doesn't mess with my flight. Today's headlines include a look at Turner Broadcasting as it begins an executive overhaul. Also, looks like David Fincher won't direct a Steve Jobs biopic for Sony Pictures. Finally, will CBS'  carrying prime-time football keep commercial rates for ESPN and NBC's football coverage from rising?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Turner Broadcasting is getting a makeover. For years, the parent company of cable channels TBS, CNN, TNT, Cartoon Network, HLN and TruTV was one of the more stable and low-key units of Time Warner Inc. Based in Atlanta, Turner seldom gets as much attention as Time Warner's Warner Bros. and HBO, despite being a cash cow that last year had operating profit of $3.5 billion and revenue of almost $10 billion. But the new leaders at Turner -- Chief Executive John Martin and President David Levy are shaking things up. There have been several high-profile departures this year -- some voluntary and some not -- and Levy has promised that more changes are in the works.
WORLD
April 11, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The Russian government has cut off broadcasts of Voice of America after a leading state media figure denounced the U.S. government-funded radio as "spam on our frequencies. " VOA's contract with the Russian media oversight agency wasn't renewed after it expired at the end of March because the Kremlin could no longer tolerate "its subversive, sanctimonious, self-serving propaganda," the Voice of Russia said in its account of the cutoff. The internal silencing of the broadcasts that beamed news and cultural programs into the Soviet Union during the Cold War represented the latest attempt by the Kremlin to eliminate media providing an alternative to those whose content and editors are controlled by the Russian government.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The Department of Justice is siding with broadcasters in their legal fight against Aereo, the start-up service that streams local television signals to consumers via the Internet. In a brief filed at the Supreme Court on Monday afternoon, the department said Aereo is "clearly infringing" on the copyrights of the broadcasters whose content it is streaming without permission, and said a lower court ruling declaring the service legal should be reversed. Launched in 2012 and available in 13 markets, Aereo plucks the signals of broadcasters and transmits them to the Internet via tiny antennae.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The practice of competing local television stations sharing resources needs tougher regulations, the Justice Department warned Friday. In a filing to the Federal Communications Commission, the department said agreements between local television stations to partner on business and editorial operations "often confer influence or control of one broadcast competitor over another. " It added that that such arrangements can also allow broadcasters to circumvent the FCC's rules limiting the number of television stations one company can own. Known in the television industry as joint sales agreements, shared service agreements or local news service agreements, such arrangements have become commonplace, particularly in small and midsize markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The broadcasting industry's top lobbyist said the Federal Communications Commission needs to work closer with the industry rather than trying to undermine it through regulatory measures that favor would-be competitors. "Over the past five years, there has been an increasingly singular focus by the federal government on broadband," said National Assn. of Broadcasters President and Chief Executive Gordon Smith in a Monday speech at the association's annual convention in Las Vegas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014
Sandy Grossman, 78, a television sports director who oversaw broadcasts of a record 10 Super Bowls and introduced several innovations to TV sports coverage, died Wednesday of cancer at his home in Boca Raton, Fla., according to his son Dean. Grossman won eight Emmys for his work in a career that spanned more than four decades. From early on, he sought to not just cover the action, but also humanize sports matches by concentrating on individuals. "A good football broadcast should be like a good novel," Grossman said in a 1980 Los Angeles Times interview.
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