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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2012 | By T. L. Stanley
Howie Mandel wore black high-top shoes - and nothing else - during a remote shoot for NBC's "America's Got Talent. " Krysten Ritter strolled around in the altogether, casually snacking and chatting on ABC's "Don't Trust the B - in Apartment 23. " And Ashton Kutcher greeted visitors on CBS' "Two and a Half Men" in shaggy shoulder-length hair and his birthday suit. These aren't clips from "Networks Gone Wild," but scenes from the recent broadcast season where instances of "full nudity" have skyrocketed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Aereo, the start-up company that transmits local broadcast television signals via the Internet, said it has raised $34 million in a new round of financing that it will use to expand its service, which is currently available in 10 cities. Among Aereo's new backers is Gordy Crawford, a well-known figure in media circles who retired last year from Capital Research and Management, where he oversaw the firm's entertainment and media investments for decades. Crawford is very close to media mogul Barry Diller, whose company IAC is a key investor in Aereo.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Remember when you had to jiggle an antenna on your TV set to get good reception for a UHF signal? Well, those days are long gone and the Federal Communications Commission thinks it is time to stop treating a UHF channel as a weak sister to a VHF channel. For those of you born after the days of rabbit ears, UHF stands for ultra high frequency and refers to channels above 13. A UHF signal was not as strong as a VHF signal. VHF stands for very high frequency and refers to channels 2 through 13. Why "ultra" was weaker than "very" when it seems that it should have been the other way around will just have to remain a mystery.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2012 | By Joe Flint and David Savage, Los Angeles Times
Broadcast television isn't going to look like cable television any time soon. In a much-anticipated decision, the Supreme Court declined Thursday to address whether the Federal Communications Commission's indecency rules - and how they are enforced - are unconstitutional. That determination vacated a lower court ruling that the FCC's enforcement of its indecency rules was unconstitutional. The ruling, which arose from a legal battle over the indecency rules between the FCC, News Corp.'s Fox and Walt Disney Co.'s ABC, means that broadcast TV will continue to have to steer clear of the swear words and nudity that have become prevalent on much of cable television, especially during hours when children might be in the viewing audience.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2012 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Soon, anyone who wants to know how much a political candidate spent on a commercial will be able to find out with the click of a button. The Federal Communications Commission voted Friday to require local television stations to publish on their websites detailed information about political advertising, including the cost of specific commercials. Although such material is already required to be made available to the public, anyone seeking to know what candidates are spending, and on what programs, typically has to visit a local television station and make a request to see what's known as the "public files.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Joe Flint
News Corp. Chief Operating Officer Chase Carey made big headlines Monday for suggesting that Fox could go from a broadcast network to cable channel to make ends meet.  The implication is that consumers would have to pay to watch Bart Simpson or catch some NFL football on Sunday afternoons. But for all intents and purpose, Fox is already a cable channel and has been for a long time. Yes, about 10% to 15% of the country's TV consumers still get Fox via antennas, but everyone else receives its signals from a pay-TV provider such as Time Warner Cable or DirecTV.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2012 | By Joe Flint
The Federal Communications Commission has put the wheels in motion to take some airwaves from broadcasters and auction that spectrum for wireless broadband. In a 5-0 vote Friday the FCC issued what is known as a notice of proposed rulemaking, which is a first step toward determining how its airwaves auction will work. Broadcasters are being asked to voluntarily give up some of their spectrum, which will then be auctioned off to wireless companies. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and the wireless industry believe that the nation is running out of spectrum for new platforms and mobile devices, particularly in large urban areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1996
Congratulations to the TV Campaign '96 Coalition for trying to convince local commercial television stations to provide daily coverage of election issues ("Most L.A. TV Stations Refuse to Set Aside Time for Issues," Calendar, Sept. 23). It is dismaying, but not surprising, to learn that some broadcasters feel they have no role to play in encouraging the development of a more knowledgeable electorate. By shirking this responsibility, broadcasters are violating the public trust that should accompany their licenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992
So after spending years bullying the networks into accepting guidelines for the depiction of violence, Sen. Paul Simon (D-Ill.) now bemoans that the guidelines "lack teeth" because they can't be enforced by law. Damn right! Maybe he's forgotten, but there's a thing called the First Amendment that prevents government from proscribing what its citizens may see and say. Ultimately, there's only one solution--abolish the FCC (at least as far as it has power to control content). After over half a century of operating by leave of the government, let broadcasters take their rightful place alongside book, magazine and newspaper publishers and let the public truly decide what it wants.
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