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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2012 | By T. L. Stanley
Howie Mandel wore black high-top shoes - and nothing else - during a remote shoot for NBC's "America's Got Talent. " Krysten Ritter strolled around in the altogether, casually snacking and chatting on ABC's "Don't Trust the B - in Apartment 23. " And Ashton Kutcher greeted visitors on CBS' "Two and a Half Men" in shaggy shoulder-length hair and his birthday suit. These aren't clips from "Networks Gone Wild," but scenes from the recent broadcast season where instances of "full nudity" have skyrocketed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2012 | By Joe Flint
The Federal Communications Commission has put the wheels in motion to take some airwaves from broadcasters and auction that spectrum for wireless broadband. In a 5-0 vote Friday the FCC issued what is known as a notice of proposed rulemaking, which is a first step toward determining how its airwaves auction will work. Broadcasters are being asked to voluntarily give up some of their spectrum, which will then be auctioned off to wireless companies. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and the wireless industry believe that the nation is running out of spectrum for new platforms and mobile devices, particularly in large urban areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | By Joe Flint
The amount of money broadcast networks are collecting from both pay-TV distributors and their own affiliate stations for their content is growing faster than Wall Street had anticipated. In a new report, Sanford C. Bernstein analyst Todd Juenger said CBS is anticipating revenue of $1 billion in 2016 from retransmission consent fees from cable and satellite operators and their own affiliates. CBS had previously said it wouldn't hit that number until 2017. According to Juenger, that figure is based on a subscription fee of $1.22 per-month, per-subscriber from multichannel video program distributors (MVPDs)
SPORTS
October 16, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
It is hard to pick one trait that distinguishes Vin Scully from ordinary broadcasters, but we'll go with this one: He knows when to shut up. Scully, working on radio during the playoffs, was at the microphone in the seventh inning of Tuesday's Game 4 of the National League championship series. With one out and the St. Louis Cardinals leading, 4-2, the Dodgers' Nick Punto doubled. The Dodgers had the potential tying run at bat, and Dodger Stadium was rocking. Punto was picked off. This is what Scully said: "Listen to the crowd now. " Dead silence, for a few uncomfortably long moments.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Jon Healey
This post has been updated, as indicated below. Unless the Federal Communications Commission swoops in, Tuesday could be a belated day of reckoning for cable TV customers with old-school analog sets. Local television stations shut off their analog broadcasts three years ago, forcing anyone who relied on over-the-air signals to switch to swap their analog TVs for digital ones or, more affordably, buy digital-to-analog converter boxes. The latter cost about $50, but the feds offered to subsidize the purchase of up to two boxes per home, cutting the price to about $10. Most cable TV subscribers, however, didn't have to worry about the change in technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1996
Congratulations to the TV Campaign '96 Coalition for trying to convince local commercial television stations to provide daily coverage of election issues ("Most L.A. TV Stations Refuse to Set Aside Time for Issues," Calendar, Sept. 23). It is dismaying, but not surprising, to learn that some broadcasters feel they have no role to play in encouraging the development of a more knowledgeable electorate. By shirking this responsibility, broadcasters are violating the public trust that should accompany their licenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992
So after spending years bullying the networks into accepting guidelines for the depiction of violence, Sen. Paul Simon (D-Ill.) now bemoans that the guidelines "lack teeth" because they can't be enforced by law. Damn right! Maybe he's forgotten, but there's a thing called the First Amendment that prevents government from proscribing what its citizens may see and say. Ultimately, there's only one solution--abolish the FCC (at least as far as it has power to control content). After over half a century of operating by leave of the government, let broadcasters take their rightful place alongside book, magazine and newspaper publishers and let the public truly decide what it wants.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Joe Flint, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
There will be no tie in the Supreme Court battle of Aereo vs. the broadcasters. Supreme Court Justice Samuel A. Alito, who previously had recused himself from participating in the case, will take part in it after all, according to SCOTUS Blog , which tracks the Supreme Court. Oral arguments in the case are scheduled for next week. Alito had given no reason for recusing himself from the case, but one possible reason is that a justice or his family has stock in some of the companies involved in the dispute.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Broadcasters including CBS Corp. and Walt Disney Co.'s ABC asked the Federal Communications Commission to delay a Nov. 4 vote on a plan to free up unused TV airwaves for wireless Internet access. The agency should push the vote back at least 70 days to allow the public to comment on this week's finding by FCC engineers that steps could be taken to prevent harm to digital television signals, the broadcasters said. The report is erroneous and the airwaves plan may interfere with millions of digital TV sets, they said.
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