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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected move, the board of governors of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences scrubbed a plan to alternate broadcasts of the Emmy Awards on CBS, ABC, NBC and Fox over the next four years and instead sold the sole rights to ABC. The move is the latest in a series of steps to remove some of the recent tarnish from the annual TV industry awards show, which last year came under heavy attack for being too lengthy and too political and having too many complex categories.
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SPORTS
August 10, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
When Kyle Martino was growing up in Westport, Conn., it was easier to find tractor pulls and Australian rules football on TV than it was to find the world's most popular sport. If you wanted to watch soccer, you needed access to European broadcasters. "When I was a kid and I fell in love with this game, I was watching games in Italian on Sunday mornings," says Martino, whose understanding of the language remains no deeper than the menu at Olive Garden. "That was my soccer. " But if soccer was once the unwanted stepchild of the television sports family, it's now one of TV's most desirable properties - so much so that NBC is wagering hundreds of millions of dollars and an unprecedented number of broadcast hours on the English Premier League, coverage Martino, a former Major League Soccer All-Star, will help anchor as a studio analyst.
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SPORTS
October 22, 2011 | By Lisa Dillman
Wondering if the kids from "Glee" will be out of high school — or at the very least, start shaving — by the time the 2015 Women's World Cup rolls around? Or the 2018 World Cup in Russia? Think of all the cross-promotional avenues from our friends at Fox, the media company emerging on Friday with the English-language rights to those tournaments, as well as the 2019 Women's World Cup and the 2022 World Cup. Close your eyes and you can practically hear "Don't Stop Believing" accompanying highlight footage of some gritty yet lovable underdog footballing side.
SPORTS
January 29, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
There wasn't much news attached to Monday's official announcement that the Dodgers had finalized their deal with Time Warner Cable, nothing that wasn't known already. The 25-year contract starts after the following season and is reportedly worth $7 billion to $8 billion. Mostly it left the same old questions: Will the deal gain Major League Baseball approval, will there be other sports programming on the channel, will there be a Spanish-language outlet, will there be any games on free television?
SPORTS
January 29, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
There wasn't much news attached to Monday's official announcement that the Dodgers had finalized their deal with Time Warner Cable, nothing that wasn't known already. The 25-year contract starts after the following season and is reportedly worth $7 billion to $8 billion. Mostly it left the same old questions: Will the deal gain Major League Baseball approval, will there be other sports programming on the channel, will there be a Spanish-language outlet, will there be any games on free television?
BUSINESS
May 15, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Canal Plus must stop buying exclusive broadcast rights to recent French films to air on a pay-per-view basis until France's competition regulator decides whether the practice is unfair, the regulator said. The Conseil de la Concurrence imposed the measure on Canal Plus and its Kiosque unit after an initial inquiry prompted by complaints from two rivals, Multivision, a TV operator, and Television Par Satellite, France's No. 2 digital-satellite TV service.
SPORTS
January 2, 1995 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jockeys Corey Black and Alex Solis were talking to reporters Sunday after a day of silence, but they won't be giving television interviews, a practice that is expected to be followed by other riders at Santa Anita. "I'm not doing any television interviews," Black said. "About the other guys, I don't know. This is my decision. We're not the stars, so they don't need us." The Jockeys' Guild's insurance agreement with the Thoroughbred Racing Assns.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2001 | From Reuters
Media group EM.TV & Merchandising said Wednesday that it had exercised an option to lift its stake in Formula One racing to 75%, gaining control over broadcast rights to one of the world's most popular sporting events. The move, clearly flagged by EM.TV and its Munich, Germany-based partner Kirch Group, has been opposed by car makers involved in Formula One racing who are wary of broadcast rights falling into the hands of a single television operator.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1994 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CBS will announce today that it has won the U.S. broadcast rights for the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, industry sources said Tuesday. CBS emerged the winner after Fox Broadcasting Co., the other contender for the TV rights, declined to bid, a source said. Fox had been seriously weighing a bid for the 1998 Winter Olympics in the wake of its surprise $1.58-billion winning bid for a new NFL contract.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1990 | DAVID GRITTEN
From a small, quiet house near a subway station in the shabbily genteel Camden Town district, a rear-guard action is being fought against government reforms that could change the face of British television. In this building, which normally houses an independent TV production company, a large, bearded, bearlike man named Simon Albury paces restlessly, rummages through piles of newspaper clippings, takes a seemingly endless string of phone calls and summons up information on a computer screen.
OPINION
March 30, 2012
Call it the "Dodgers tax. " Pay-TV analysts expect Guggenheim Baseball Management, the investment group that paid an astronomical sum for the Dodgers, to recover at least part of its investment by charging a sky-high fee for the right to broadcast the team's games. With local stations and cable channels run by Time Warner Cable and News Corp. expected to get into a bidding war for those rights, the team is virtually guaranteed a multibillion-dollar contract - not unlike the one the Lakers won last year from Time Warner.
SPORTS
November 16, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
The Dodgers sued Fox Sports on Wednesday morning, alleging that the television company is trying to "interfere" with the sale of the team in bankruptcy. In a sharply worded court filing Wednesday night, Fox said it would ask that the Dodgers be dismissed from bankruptcy. In the process, Fox slammed Major League Baseball as "Prime Ticket's former ally" and claimed the only reason Dodgers owner Frank McCourt wants to sell the team's TV rights now is to put "value rightfully belonging to Prime Ticket in his own pocket.
SPORTS
October 22, 2011 | By Lisa Dillman
Wondering if the kids from "Glee" will be out of high school — or at the very least, start shaving — by the time the 2015 Women's World Cup rolls around? Or the 2018 World Cup in Russia? Think of all the cross-promotional avenues from our friends at Fox, the media company emerging on Friday with the English-language rights to those tournaments, as well as the 2019 Women's World Cup and the 2022 World Cup. Close your eyes and you can practically hear "Don't Stop Believing" accompanying highlight footage of some gritty yet lovable underdog footballing side.
SPORTS
September 16, 2011 | By Eric Sondheimer
Time Warner Cable has entered into a 15-year agreement with the California Interscholastic Federation to assume broadcast rights for regional and state championships in boys' and girls' sports effective this school year, CIF Executive Director Marie Ishida announced Thursday. No financial details were released. Time Warner is scheduled to broadcast at least 60 championship games via television and the Internet this school year and 80 in future years. Negotiations are still taking place with Time Warner to become involved in regular-season and section championship events.
HOME & GARDEN
April 23, 2011 | Chris Erskine
Mazel tov, England. As your former suburb, we just want you to know how enchanted we are with what's happening over there right now between William and Catherine (a.k.a. Kate). We hear there'll be some sort of ceremony soon. The world will pause. Hearts will flutter. I'll eat a turtle dove -- extra fries. For a moment, the British Empire will shine once more. And, through it all, America will have wedding envy. What's wedding envy? That's when someone has a bigger wedding than yours.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez and Chris Lee
Frenzied interest in all things Michael Jackson notwithstanding, it appears a TV special based on the pop star's comeback concerts won't be on the air this fall. AEG Live, the promoter behind Jackson's 50-date This Is It London concert engagement, has been negotiating for several days with movie studios for the film rights to high-definition video footage of his rehearsals as well as broadcast rights to a tie-in TV special.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
British TV viewers are going to get a dash of Disney with their morning bowl of Weetabix as a result of new commercial television franchises awarded here Wednesday. Sunrise Television, a consortium that includes Walt Disney Co. Ltd. and several British media companies, won the lucrative contract to broadcast a commercial breakfast-time program across Britain, seven days a week. The license covers a 10-year period starting Jan. 1, 1993.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2009 | Chris Lee
Over the weekend, Sony Pictures emerged as the front-runner in a frenzied bidding war to acquire Hollywood's hottest entertainment property: film rights to footage from Michael Jackson's rehearsals for his "This Is It" comeback concert series.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2009 | Chris Lee
Over the weekend, Sony Pictures emerged as the front-runner in a frenzied bidding war to acquire Hollywood's hottest entertainment property: film rights to footage from Michael Jackson's rehearsals for his "This Is It" comeback concert series.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Canal Plus must stop buying exclusive broadcast rights to recent French films to air on a pay-per-view basis until France's competition regulator decides whether the practice is unfair, the regulator said. The Conseil de la Concurrence imposed the measure on Canal Plus and its Kiosque unit after an initial inquiry prompted by complaints from two rivals, Multivision, a TV operator, and Television Par Satellite, France's No. 2 digital-satellite TV service.
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