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Broccoli Sprouts

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HEALTH
February 13, 2006 | Elena Conis
Mature broccoli is packed with vitamins, minerals, fiber and several phytochemicals that are proving to be powerful anti-cancer agents in the lab. Young broccoli sprouts, however, have a much higher concentration of two types of these cancer-fighting chemicals known as glucosinolates and isothiocyanates. Similar compounds are also found in other cruciferous vegetables, including Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale and mustard greens.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
February 13, 2006 | Elena Conis
Mature broccoli is packed with vitamins, minerals, fiber and several phytochemicals that are proving to be powerful anti-cancer agents in the lab. Young broccoli sprouts, however, have a much higher concentration of two types of these cancer-fighting chemicals known as glucosinolates and isothiocyanates. Similar compounds are also found in other cruciferous vegetables, including Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale and mustard greens.
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HEALTH
September 29, 1997 | ROBERT COOKE, NEWSDAY
The new mantra from Mom may soon be, "Eat your broccoli sprouts." Three-day-old sprouts from broccoli seeds are 20 to 50 times richer in the chemicals thought to protect against cancer, compared with mature broccoli, scientists reported at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Baltimore. So a seemingly insurmountable problem--how to gag down enough broccoli to do some good--may be solved. The tiny sprouts don't even taste like broccoli.
HEALTH
November 14, 2005 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
A few ounces of broccoli sprouts a day might go a long way in reducing the risk of stomach cancer, according to research presented last week at the American Assn. for Cancer Research. That's because broccoli sprouts contain abundant amounts of sulforaphane, a substance known to inhibit Helicobacter pylori -- the bug made famous by this year's Nobel Prize in medicine.
HEALTH
March 2, 1998 | MARK GUIDERA, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Will an increasingly health-conscious nation clamor for broccoli sprouts? That would make Dr. Paul Talalay happy. He is, after all, the Johns Hopkins University Medical School researcher who determined that broccoli sprouts contain high concentrations of sulforaphane, an organic compound that spurs cells to produce cancer-blocking enzymes.
HEALTH
November 14, 2005 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
A few ounces of broccoli sprouts a day might go a long way in reducing the risk of stomach cancer, according to research presented last week at the American Assn. for Cancer Research. That's because broccoli sprouts contain abundant amounts of sulforaphane, a substance known to inhibit Helicobacter pylori -- the bug made famous by this year's Nobel Prize in medicine.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2002 | From the Washington Post
Bad news for those who can't stomach broccoli: New research suggests that it is especially good for the stomach. A compound found in broccoli and broccoli sprouts appears to be more effective than modern antibiotics against the bacteria that cause peptic ulcers. Moreover, tests in mice suggest the compound offers formidable protection against stomach cancer--the second most common form of cancer worldwide.
HOME & GARDEN
October 2, 1999 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Do you hear the word "sprouts" and envision a mayonnaise jar under the kitchen sink filled with unappetizing white strands? I did . . . until recently. Then I tasted the nutty, earthy taste of lentil sprouts, the slightly peppery flavor of broccoli sprouts and the rich flavor of onion sprouts. "There's a lot more out there than bean sprouts," says Mary Kidd, production manager of R&R Sprouts in Santa Fe Springs, which sells at the Fullerton Certified Farmers' Market.
HOME & GARDEN
March 13, 1993 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS
A wide variety of vegetables can be grown year-round in the Orange County climate. Here is a guide to help plan a perpetual garden: JANUARY Seed, transplant and/or harvest Artichokes, asparagus, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, carrots, endive, kohlrabi, leeks, lettuce, mustard greens, onions, onion and garlic sets, radishes, parsnips, salsify, turnips, parsley, spinach, Swiss chard, rhubarb, horseradish.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | ROBERT SMAUS
Seasonal things to plant from October through December.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2002 | From the Washington Post
Bad news for those who can't stomach broccoli: New research suggests that it is especially good for the stomach. A compound found in broccoli and broccoli sprouts appears to be more effective than modern antibiotics against the bacteria that cause peptic ulcers. Moreover, tests in mice suggest the compound offers formidable protection against stomach cancer--the second most common form of cancer worldwide.
HOME & GARDEN
October 2, 1999 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Do you hear the word "sprouts" and envision a mayonnaise jar under the kitchen sink filled with unappetizing white strands? I did . . . until recently. Then I tasted the nutty, earthy taste of lentil sprouts, the slightly peppery flavor of broccoli sprouts and the rich flavor of onion sprouts. "There's a lot more out there than bean sprouts," says Mary Kidd, production manager of R&R Sprouts in Santa Fe Springs, which sells at the Fullerton Certified Farmers' Market.
HEALTH
March 2, 1998 | MARK GUIDERA, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Will an increasingly health-conscious nation clamor for broccoli sprouts? That would make Dr. Paul Talalay happy. He is, after all, the Johns Hopkins University Medical School researcher who determined that broccoli sprouts contain high concentrations of sulforaphane, an organic compound that spurs cells to produce cancer-blocking enzymes.
HEALTH
September 29, 1997 | ROBERT COOKE, NEWSDAY
The new mantra from Mom may soon be, "Eat your broccoli sprouts." Three-day-old sprouts from broccoli seeds are 20 to 50 times richer in the chemicals thought to protect against cancer, compared with mature broccoli, scientists reported at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Baltimore. So a seemingly insurmountable problem--how to gag down enough broccoli to do some good--may be solved. The tiny sprouts don't even taste like broccoli.
FOOD
May 9, 1996 | SYLVIA THOMPSON and Thompson is author of "The Kitchen Garden" and "The Kitchen Garden Cookbook" (Bantam Books, 1995).
EVERYWHERE Sow: All squashes, pumpkins, gourds (except in the low desert). Also all beans, corn, cucumbers, tomatoes, tomatillos (except in the deserts), okra (except in the high mountains), melons, peanuts, peppers and watermelons (except in the low desert and mountains), beets, carrots, celeriac, celery, leaf celery, kohlrabi, New Zealand spinach, spring greens and herbs, and sunflowers (except in the deserts and interior where fuchsias won't grow).
NEWS
April 5, 1985
Chemicals in such vegetables as cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower apparently help prevent cancer in laboratory animals, a Johns Hopkins University scientist told an American Cancer Society seminar for medical writers in San Diego. Dr. John Bueding said substances in cruciferous vegetables also may protect the body against radiation damage from X-rays and cancer treatments.
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