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Broccoli

SCIENCE
February 22, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Australia's oldest human remains are 40,000 years old, not 62,000, as had previously been believed, researchers from the University of Melbourne reported in Thursday's issue of Nature. The revised age for the remains, found in southeast Australia, fits much better with the theory that early humans evolved in Africa and subsequently migrated to the rest of the world. The now-discredited older date had supported the idea that different groups of humans evolved independently.
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SCIENCE
February 22, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stanford University Medical Center researchers have discovered a single gene that helps explain why some love broccoli while others can't bear it. In tests, some people recoil upon chewing on paper soaked in a bitter, man-made compound called phenylthiocarbamide, or PTC, while others can chomp without gagging. The researchers report in Friday's issue of Science that they have identified the gene responsible for the ability to taste PTC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2003 | Daniel Hernandez, Times Staff Writer
Here's another reason to hate broccoli. About 43,000 pounds of the vegetable spilled from an overturned big rig early Tuesday and snarled rush-hour traffic at an interchange between the southbound Golden State and eastbound San Bernardino freeways. Broccoli heads blanketed the curving two-lane interchange just south of Mission Avenue near Lincoln Heights, where the trailer toppled on its side and ripped open at 4:30 a.m.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2002 | MELINDA FULMER and KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Grape grower Jim Pandol has been praying hard that his Thompson seedless table grapes will last longer than the lockout at West Coast ports. Like many California food producers, he counts on exporting a portion of his crop at higher prices to help make farming profitable. But with 200 tons stuck in port, unable to get to customers in Taiwan, Hong Kong and the Philippines, and an additional 600 tons backing up in his warehouses in the San Joaquin Valley, the operator of Pandol Bros.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2002 | From the Washington Post
Bad news for those who can't stomach broccoli: New research suggests that it is especially good for the stomach. A compound found in broccoli and broccoli sprouts appears to be more effective than modern antibiotics against the bacteria that cause peptic ulcers. Moreover, tests in mice suggest the compound offers formidable protection against stomach cancer--the second most common form of cancer worldwide.
FOOD
February 13, 2002 | CINDY DORN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DEAR SOS: My girlfriend and I had a wonderful Valentine's dinner at La Traviata in Long Beach. The ambience was romantic, the service and entertainment were great, but the sea bass was to die for. Can you get the recipe? JOHN E. MIN Los Angeles DEAR JOHN: Here it is, almost Valentine's Day again. We got the recipe, but we substituted halibut because Chilean sea bass is so overfished. We used the restaurant's glaze and ponzu sauce. Make it for your girlfriend at home this year.
FOOD
January 30, 2002 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their first giddy optimism, the leaders of the French Revolution figured they would just sweep away all the old traditions and substitute bright, shiny new ones. There was a certain goofy, naive charm to this idea--until it hardened into the fanaticism of the Terror, anyway. They decided that the day would be neatly divided into 10 hours, each made up of 100 minutes 100 seconds long.
FOOD
March 28, 2001
Though Anna Thomas may be a worthy competitor ('My Soup and How It Grew," March 14), this nutrition-minded-but culinarily impaired single father and 11-year-old son believe we rightfully retain the "Green Soup" appellation with our concoction of broccoli, cauliflower, carrot, celery, potato, onion, oats, skim milk, ham hock, chicken broth, bouillon cubes and water. After simmering ingredients (minus milk) for a while, let cool, add milk and blend until smooth (be sure to remove ham hocks before blending, otherwise it gets ugly)
NEWS
February 11, 2001 | PHILIP BRASHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When it comes to fighting cancer, not all broccoli is created equal. Broccoli contains a compound, glucoraphanin, believed to aid in preventing some types of cancer. But the Agriculture Department studied 71 types of broccoli plants and found a 30-fold difference in the amounts of glucoraphanin. Some had virtually none of it. The varieties of broccoli typically sold in supermarkets do not vary that much, but they do differ.
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