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Broccoli

HEALTH
January 29, 2001 | SHELDON MARGEN and DALE A. OGAR
Broccoli is among the most nutritious of all vegetables, so we thought we'd give it some of the attention it deserves, especially since California grows 90% of the broccoli in the United States. We have the Italians to thank for many wonderful foods, and for broccoli, as well. It is one of a group of cruciferous vegetables that are nutritious and contain some important phytochemicals, which are thought to help reduce the risk of cancer.
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MAGAZINE
March 12, 2000 | JESSICA STRAND, Jessica Strand last wrote about pork loin for the magazine
Like so many obsessive relationships, my affair with broccoli raab got off to a rocky start. I was enjoying the pleasures of Italy when I first encountered the bitter green--known to the Italians as brocoletti di rape or rapini. My husband and I were joining his family for dinner at La Roseta, an elegant restaurant in the middle of Perugia, a town known best for its chocolates.
FOOD
December 26, 1999 | DIANE MORGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bored with broccoli? It's pretty on the plate, but by December I find myself walking the produce aisles rooting around, so to speak, for an alternative vegetable to accompany a simple pot roast. Look no further than to a humble yet delicious combination of carrots and onions to brighten up an entree plate, then use the leftovers as the basis for this hearty pasta dish. To make this simple side dish, cut 12 medium carrots into 1/4-inch-thick rounds. Cut 3 large yellow onions into thin wedges.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1999 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Video The Nuttiest Nutcracker. Columbia TriStar Home Video. $15. For the family. It's silly and raucous--"No way, cheeseball," says teenage Marie to the Rat King's marriage proposal--and this computer-animated musical twist on "The Nutcracker Suite" tale doesn't match Disney's "Toy Story" wizardry, but the colorful 3-D visuals are still pretty remarkable.
FOOD
December 1, 1999 | CHERYL HECHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This dinner is a working person's dream--fast and adaptable. It features broccoli at its best, flavored with only garlic and a little Pecorino Romano. No Romano on hand? Try freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. As the broccoli cooks, it goes from crisp-tender to overdone quickly and will lose texture as it sits. Keep an eye on it during the final few minutes and serve it immediately. Round out the meal with garlic bread and a glass of Pinot Grigio.
NEWS
September 28, 1999 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The myth: California, haven of healthful eating and exercising, of gyms and sprouted grains, jogging and Jamba juice. The truth: Lots of talk, little action. So says a new survey by the state Department of Health Services, which found that despite an overarching concern about eating right, Californians followed national trends for poor diet and sloth--a trend researchers warn could signal a steep decline in public health.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1999 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Broccoli, so hated by former President Bush that he banned it from Air Force One, is a darling of the vegetable patch. Studies that show it contains a cancer-fighting chemical and packaging innovations that make it easier for consumers to prepare, have helped boost broccoli sales at a time when overall vegetable consumption is flat. Experts believe the popularity of broccoli will continue to grow, despite a steady increase in the retail price of the crunchy vegetable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1999 | J. ROBERT HATHERILL, J. Robert Hatherill, a research scientist and faculty member of the environmental studies program at UC Santa Barbara, is author of "Eat to Beat Cancer" (Renaissance Books 1998)
Times are tough when you have to talk in hushed tones about hamburger safety. These days, merely implying that a food is unsafe can land you in court, as Oprah Winfrey learned with her now-famous comments against ground beef. The lesson swiftly became a personal one when my publisher stripped lengthy passages from my new book.
HOME & GARDEN
November 14, 1998 | Help Line U.C. MASTER GARDENERS
Question: How do I grow broccoli in a home garden? What pests bother it? J.D., Westminster Answer: Plant broccoli in fall--now is the best time--in full sun in soil that drains well and is rich in organic matter. Set transplants 15 to 24 inches apart in rows 2 to 3 feet apart. From seed, it often works well to start in small containers and wait until the plants are 2 to 3 inches tall before transplanting into the garden. Once established, broccoli plants should be kept moist but not soggy.
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