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BUSINESS
August 23, 2000 | Associated Press
In the biggest wine-labeling settlement to date, federal regulators have accepted a $750,000 settlement from Bronco Wine Co. after a four-year investigation. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms began investigating Bronco after receiving complaints about the company's use of the name Rutherford Vineyards on its labels, an apparent reference to a grape-growing region.
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BUSINESS
April 30, 2006 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
On a wind-swept vineyard south of Sacramento, a small army of laborers armed with razor-sharp knives is fighting the next battle in California's wine wars. Prunings from last year's cabernet sauvignon crop lie in piles next to Jose Antonio Gonzalez and his crew as they make their way down the long rows of this 3,000-acre vineyard. Gonzalez pauses, then deftly uses his long knife to strip bark from a section of the woody vine. Sap wells forth like tears. Gonzalez slices deeper into the plant.
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BUSINESS
January 4, 2000
* Beringer Wine Estates Holdings Inc., a major producer of California wines, agreed to sell its Napa Ridge brand to closely held Bronco Wine Co. of Ceres, Calif., for about $40 million to focus on better-selling products.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2006 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Old wine, new flasks. A long-running battle between the maker of the popular $1.99 Charles Shaw wine -- widely known as Two-Buck Chuck -- and the nation's elite vintners over the use of "Napa" on labels came to an end Friday. Bronco Wine Co. agreed to drop "Napa" from the label of a wine made with grapes grown outside the famous Napa Valley wine region. Two of Bronco's Napa-named wines will contain Napa grapes, the Ceres, Calif., company said.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2005 | From Reuters
The Napa Valley Vintners trade group said the California Supreme Court had denied an appeal against a lower court decision in the group's long-standing legal battle with Bronco Wine Co. The California Court of Appeal ruled in May that any wine bottle with the word "Napa" on the label must be made mostly from local grapes as required by state law. Bronco Wine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Four former employees of the company that produces the wine known as Two Buck Chuck are suing, saying they weren't paid for working overtime or given lunch breaks. According to papers filed in Napa Superior Court, Perry Roberts, Brian Bingham, David Yoch and Scott Christensen say they were classified as exempt from overtime even though their work was primarily manual. The four say they were production supervisors at Bronco Wine Co.'s Napa and Ceres, Calif.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2006 | Michael Muskal, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear a challenge to a California law that requires wines carrying the name "Napa" to have at least 75% of their grapes from Napa County. The decision not to consider an appeal from Bronco Wine Co. is a legal defeat for the maverick winemaker based in Ceres, Calif. -- best known for its low-end Charles Shaw line of wines nicknamed Two-Buck Chuck.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New legislation intended to preserve the cachet of Napa Valley wine was dealt a setback by a California appellate court that ordered a temporary injunction blocking the statute from taking effect. The law, passed in September, requires wines using "Napa" in their brand names to get at least 75% of their grapes from the prestigious grape-growing county. The injunction was sought by Bronco Wine Co.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2005 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
The maker of the popular $1.99 Charles Shaw wine, widely known as "Two Buck Chuck," might be winning on store shelves, but it has lost again in the courts. A state appeals court in Sacramento on Thursday rejected the arguments of Bronco Wine Co. in its fight to use the word "Napa" on wines that don't always contain grapes grown in California's Napa Valley wine region. Maverick winemaker Fred Franzia, owner of Ceres, Calif.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2006 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Old wine, new flasks. A long-running battle between the maker of the popular $1.99 Charles Shaw wine -- widely known as Two-Buck Chuck -- and the nation's elite vintners over the use of "Napa" on labels came to an end Friday. Bronco Wine Co. agreed to drop "Napa" from the label of a wine made with grapes grown outside the famous Napa Valley wine region. Two of Bronco's Napa-named wines will contain Napa grapes, the Ceres, Calif., company said.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2006 | Michael Muskal, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear a challenge to a California law that requires wines carrying the name "Napa" to have at least 75% of their grapes from Napa County. The decision not to consider an appeal from Bronco Wine Co. is a legal defeat for the maverick winemaker based in Ceres, Calif. -- best known for its low-end Charles Shaw line of wines nicknamed Two-Buck Chuck.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2005 | From Reuters
The Napa Valley Vintners trade group said the California Supreme Court had denied an appeal against a lower court decision in the group's long-standing legal battle with Bronco Wine Co. The California Court of Appeal ruled in May that any wine bottle with the word "Napa" on the label must be made mostly from local grapes as required by state law. Bronco Wine Co.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2005 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
The maker of the popular $1.99 Charles Shaw wine, widely known as "Two Buck Chuck," might be winning on store shelves, but it has lost again in the courts. A state appeals court in Sacramento on Thursday rejected the arguments of Bronco Wine Co. in its fight to use the word "Napa" on wines that don't always contain grapes grown in California's Napa Valley wine region. Maverick winemaker Fred Franzia, owner of Ceres, Calif.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2005 | Annette Haddad, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court sent a message Monday to Bronco Wine Co.: Chuck it -- for now. The maker of the popular $1.99 Charles Shaw wine, widely known as "Two Buck Chuck," hit another stumbling block in its fight to use the word "Napa" on wines that contain few, if any, Napa-grown grapes. The nation's high court rejected without comment Bronco's request for it to intercede in a dispute over how California wines are labeled.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2004 | Maura Dolan and Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writers
The California Supreme Court dealt a setback to maverick winemaker Fred Franzia on Thursday, much to the delight of his Napa Valley rivals. The state high court, saying that it wanted to "provide stricter protection to consumers," forbade all winemakers from using a regional name such as "Napa" on their labels unless 75% of the grapes in the bottle were actually grown in the place in question.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Four former employees of the company that produces the wine known as Two Buck Chuck are suing, saying they weren't paid for working overtime or given lunch breaks. According to papers filed in Napa Superior Court, Perry Roberts, Brian Bingham, David Yoch and Scott Christensen say they were classified as exempt from overtime even though their work was primarily manual. The four say they were production supervisors at Bronco Wine Co.'s Napa and Ceres, Calif.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2003 | Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writer
Most California winemakers were hoping it was a passing fad, one whose popularity would fade as quickly as the pet rock's. Their thinking was that either people would get tired of drinking $1.99-a-bottle Charles Shaw wines or manufacturer Bronco Wine Co. would run out of the low-cost grapes used to make it. One year after it showed up on the shelves at Trader Joe's grocery stores, neither has happened. In fact, demand for the wine, affectionately known as Two-Buck Chuck, is gushing.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2006 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
On a wind-swept vineyard south of Sacramento, a small army of laborers armed with razor-sharp knives is fighting the next battle in California's wine wars. Prunings from last year's cabernet sauvignon crop lie in piles next to Jose Antonio Gonzalez and his crew as they make their way down the long rows of this 3,000-acre vineyard. Gonzalez pauses, then deftly uses his long knife to strip bark from a section of the woody vine. Sap wells forth like tears. Gonzalez slices deeper into the plant.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2003 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Here on the western edge of the Sierra foothills, underneath the soaring cooling towers of the defunct Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, 5,000 acres of rock-strewn vineyards mark the birthplace of Fred Franzia's Two-Buck Chuck. As the amiable and ample Franzia leads a visitor through neatly planted Cabernet Sauvignon vines, he discusses why he's perplexed that his Bronco Wine Co., which makes the $1.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2003 | Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writer
Most California winemakers were hoping it was a passing fad, one whose popularity would fade as quickly as the pet rock's. Their thinking was that either people would get tired of drinking $1.99-a-bottle Charles Shaw wines or manufacturer Bronco Wine Co. would run out of the low-cost grapes used to make it. One year after it showed up on the shelves at Trader Joe's grocery stores, neither has happened. In fact, demand for the wine, affectionately known as Two-Buck Chuck, is gushing.
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