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Brooke Hodge

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November 3, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Brooke Hodge, assistant dean for arts programs at Harvard University's Graduate School of Design, has been named curator of architecture and design at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. The appointment, announced Thursday, formalizes the museum's plans to enter the field of design while continuing its commitment to architecture. Hodge will develop exhibitions, publications and programs for a new venture--the MOCA Gallery at the Pacific Design Center, which will open Jan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2009 | Paul Young
For an architecture firm with only four years' experience, it's surprising how much attention Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues have received. "It's a little crazy," says Ball, 41. "And it puts a little pressure on us because people seem to have higher expectations." Indeed, in three short years, they've received commissions from the likes of MOMA, MOCA, Tiffany & Co., Frank Gehry and the 2008 Architecture Biennale in Venice, Italy. Yet they still haven't built a single permanent structure.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2001 | IRENE LACHER
Irene Lacher is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer. If life really did imitate art, you could call this moment "curator descending a staircase." Brooke Hodge, the Museum of Contemporary Art's first curator of architecture and design, is rushing downstairs to meet the billboard designers who will help promote her first exhibition here, "What's Shakin': New Architecture in L.A.," which opens today.
HOME & GARDEN
December 13, 2008 | David A. Keeps
Is that design diva Kelly Wearstler pushing a cart past shelves of discount sushi plates and $14.99 rugs? Is that Museum of Contemporary Art curator Brooke Hodge casting her discriminating eye on the sale vases at Tuesday Morning? And could that really be Philippe Starck, arguably the most famed product designer in the world, buying children's furniture at closeout emporium Big Lots? Yes. Yes. And, oh, yes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2008 | Paul Young
ARCHITECTURE shows are increasingly common in museums, but two recent exhibits offer a slightly different take on an old theme. "Lessons From Bernard Rudofsky" at the Getty Center offers fashion as well as buildings, while "Inside Architecture" at MOCA's Pacific Design Center site explores a more private kind of architecture, not through the eyes of designers, but through the imagination of contemporary artists. The relatively small MOCA show presents 19 works by nine artists including Thomas Struth, Paul Winstanley, David Hockney and Richard Prince.
HOME & GARDEN
January 3, 2008 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
LOOK at the top design trends for the coming year, and it's clear that the past will shape our future. The Hollywood Regency craze has evolved, creating a hunger for antiques and cleverly updated pieces that pay homage to French neoclassicism and all-American tradition. A counterpoint to all this ornamentation? There's a separate move toward minimalism, including chinoiserie that's more Mod than Ming. And as for bringing the natural world home: We're not out of the woods yet. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2009 | Paul Young
For an architecture firm with only four years' experience, it's surprising how much attention Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues have received. "It's a little crazy," says Ball, 41. "And it puts a little pressure on us because people seem to have higher expectations." Indeed, in three short years, they've received commissions from the likes of MOMA, MOCA, Tiffany & Co., Frank Gehry and the 2008 Architecture Biennale in Venice, Italy. Yet they still haven't built a single permanent structure.
HOME & GARDEN
December 13, 2008 | David A. Keeps
Is that design diva Kelly Wearstler pushing a cart past shelves of discount sushi plates and $14.99 rugs? Is that Museum of Contemporary Art curator Brooke Hodge casting her discriminating eye on the sale vases at Tuesday Morning? And could that really be Philippe Starck, arguably the most famed product designer in the world, buying children's furniture at closeout emporium Big Lots? Yes. Yes. And, oh, yes.
NEWS
February 8, 2001 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brooke Hodge, the new curator of architecture and design at the Museum of Contemporary Art, comes to her post with a fresh perspective on Los Angeles. Previously she was assistant dean of the arts programs at Harvard's Graduate School of Design, adjunct curator of architecture and design at Harvard University Art Museums, and before that, exhibitions coordinator for the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Who says art and sports don't mix? On Saturday afternoon, the MAK Center for Art and Architecture will host an invitational tennis tournament at which art world and entertainment figures will compete on the newly completed Goldstein Court of the Sheats/Goldstein Residence in Beverly Crest near Beverly Hills. The event, a benefit for the MAK Center, also includes cocktails at sunset, BBQ from Baby Blues and guided tours of the historic 1963 home, designed by architect John Lautner, and its James Turrell Skyspace, "Above Horizon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2008 | Paul Young
ARCHITECTURE shows are increasingly common in museums, but two recent exhibits offer a slightly different take on an old theme. "Lessons From Bernard Rudofsky" at the Getty Center offers fashion as well as buildings, while "Inside Architecture" at MOCA's Pacific Design Center site explores a more private kind of architecture, not through the eyes of designers, but through the imagination of contemporary artists. The relatively small MOCA show presents 19 works by nine artists including Thomas Struth, Paul Winstanley, David Hockney and Richard Prince.
HOME & GARDEN
January 3, 2008 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
LOOK at the top design trends for the coming year, and it's clear that the past will shape our future. The Hollywood Regency craze has evolved, creating a hunger for antiques and cleverly updated pieces that pay homage to French neoclassicism and all-American tradition. A counterpoint to all this ornamentation? There's a separate move toward minimalism, including chinoiserie that's more Mod than Ming. And as for bringing the natural world home: We're not out of the woods yet. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2001 | IRENE LACHER
Irene Lacher is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer. If life really did imitate art, you could call this moment "curator descending a staircase." Brooke Hodge, the Museum of Contemporary Art's first curator of architecture and design, is rushing downstairs to meet the billboard designers who will help promote her first exhibition here, "What's Shakin': New Architecture in L.A.," which opens today.
NEWS
February 8, 2001 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brooke Hodge, the new curator of architecture and design at the Museum of Contemporary Art, comes to her post with a fresh perspective on Los Angeles. Previously she was assistant dean of the arts programs at Harvard's Graduate School of Design, adjunct curator of architecture and design at Harvard University Art Museums, and before that, exhibitions coordinator for the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2000 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Brooke Hodge, assistant dean for arts programs at Harvard University's Graduate School of Design, has been named curator of architecture and design at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. The appointment, announced Thursday, formalizes the museum's plans to enter the field of design while continuing its commitment to architecture. Hodge will develop exhibitions, publications and programs for a new venture--the MOCA Gallery at the Pacific Design Center, which will open Jan.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
Adam Silverman's plan for a quiet 2013 isn't panning out. On Oct. 27 the Laguna Art Museum will mount a show of the Los Angeles potter's work, and on Tuesday publisher Skira Rizzoli releases his book, “Adam Silverman Ceramics.” The monograph is a sumptuous overview of his recent work organized in a nontraditional format. “I wanted the book to be its own beautiful, self-standing object that is as good as the pots or better,” Silverman said. “I wanted it to have its own identity.” The bulk of the book consists of photographs by Stefano Massei of Silverman's tactile stoneware vessels.
HOME & GARDEN
September 20, 2007 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
THE latest design revival celebrates one of the most elemental motifs in furniture: animal legs and feet. Everywhere you look -- be it in the mass-market Shakespeare & Co. bookcase from Thomasville or the high-end BC Workshop collection at L.A.'s Blackman Cruz -- you'll find bookcases with griffins' talons or marble consoles with bronze horses' hindquarters. "It all started with antlers," says Brooke Hodge, curator of architecture and design at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles.
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