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Brookings Institution

NEWS
November 21, 1996 | From Associated Press
Newly released audiotapes reveal that former President Richard Nixon ordered his chief of staff, H. R. Haldeman, to break into the Brookings Institution, presumably to remove documents regarding the Vietnam War, the San Francisco Examiner reports in today's editions. The Examiner story, from its Washington bureau, was released to the Associated Press in advance of publication.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000
Propelled by a booming local economy, Orange County is leading the way in California's campaign to remove aid recipients from the welfare rolls, according to a study to be released today by a Washington think tank. The Brookings Institution report found that Orange County reduced its welfare rolls by 42% since 1994, recording the biggest drop in Southern California and the second-largest statewide behind Santa Clara County in the Silicon Valley.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | W.J. Hennigan
As the Pentagon moves beyond the relatively low-tech wars in the Middle East and turns its attention to future national security challenges, it has doubled down on sophisticated new radar-jamming devices that aim to render adversaries' air defenses useless. Although the U.S. faced limited resistance in the skies above Iraq and Afghanistan, that would not be the case in Asia, where the Obama administration plans to shift its diplomatic focus and strengthen its defense strategy in the coming decade.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2002 | Alan C. Miller and Kevin Sack, Times Staff Writers
Though many had died flying the Harrier, Marine Corps pilot Peter E. Yount never thought it would let him down. He knew the attack jet well and was devoted to it. In the entire U.S. arsenal, only the compact, muscular-looking Harrier could lift straight up off a runway, hover like a hummingbird, then blast off in search of targets. "Difficult but honest" is how Yount described it. But on a clear spring day in 1998, the Harrier would betray him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2011 | By Gale Holland and Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
For a clue to why California is losing its allure as a place to settle down, just ask Jennifer McCluer, who moved out of California in 2007 after she obtained her license in skin care. Unable to afford Orange County's sky-high rents, she opted for Portland, Ore. "A big motivator was that I lived with roommate after roommate after roommate," said McCluer, 30. "Friends said you could probably live on your own up here. The rent was a huge deal for me. " McCluer would like to move back, but it's still too expensive.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
Who's the most influential billionaire business figure in national politics? If you answered one of the Koch brothers (Charles or David) or George Soros, you're wearing your partisan blinders. The former are known for their devotion to conservative causes, the latter to liberal. In either case, you're wrong. The most influential billionaire in America is Peter G. Peterson. The son of Greek immigrants, Peterson, 86, served as Commerce secretary under President Nixon, then became chairman and chief executive of Lehman Bros.
WORLD
June 9, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
As drug cartels wreak murderous havoc from Mexico to Panama, the Obama administration is unable to show that the billions of dollars spent in the war on drugs have significantly stemmed the flow of illegal narcotics into the United States, according to two government reports and outside experts. The reports specifically criticize the government's growing use of U.S. contractors, which were paid more than $3 billion to train local prosecutors and police, help eradicate fields of coca, operate surveillance equipment and otherwise battle the widening drug trade in Latin America over the last five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1991
Although Shaw chooses to conclude his series by stating that "it would be rank sexism to suggest that reporters of either sex have a monopoly on intelligence, sensitivity, frankness or virtually any other quality," the slant of his second article, it seems to me, is that there is something called "a female perspective" that can affect the production of news. He writes, for example, "Perhaps it is no wonder then that most male editors tend to be more squeamish and more ambivalent about coverage of sexually charged issues than do most women."
BUSINESS
October 18, 1992
It's incredible that Alice M. Rivlin, a supposedly learned member of the Brookings Institution, doesn't seem to know that U.S. Presidents can't spend a penny, or raise or lower taxes, unless it has been approved by Congress, "Why Bush's Congress Bashing on Federal Spending Just Doesn't Add Up" (Sept. 27). Democrats have controlled Congress for most of the last 40 years. And the "mandated" spending she speaks of as virtually untouchable could be "un-mandated" by Congress if they had the courage and integrity to do what's best for the country instead of doing what it takes to get reelected.
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