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Brookings Institution

BUSINESS
October 18, 1992
It's incredible that Alice M. Rivlin, a supposedly learned member of the Brookings Institution, doesn't seem to know that U.S. Presidents can't spend a penny, or raise or lower taxes, unless it has been approved by Congress, "Why Bush's Congress Bashing on Federal Spending Just Doesn't Add Up" (Sept. 27). Democrats have controlled Congress for most of the last 40 years. And the "mandated" spending she speaks of as virtually untouchable could be "un-mandated" by Congress if they had the courage and integrity to do what's best for the country instead of doing what it takes to get reelected.
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BUSINESS
March 7, 2001 | Stuart Silverstein
Researchers from USC and the Brookings Institution think tank will issue a report today urging Southern California community leaders to combat the problems of sprawl by developing coordinated regional growth policies. Among other things, the report calls for efforts to encourage home building and job creation in the region's aging communities, where many poor and low-income workers are concentrated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1985 | Associated Press
Richard V. Gilbert, an economics adviser in President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Administration, has died at home at age 83. He had been ill with cancer and suffered a heart attack 10 days before his death last Sunday. Gilbert served as a speechwriter for Roosevelt on economic issues during World War II. Economist Walter Salant of the Brookings Institution in Washington once called Gilbert "the outstanding, unsung hero of American wartime economic policy."
NEWS
January 18, 1993
Ed A. Hewett, 50, a National Security Council staff member considered an authority on the economies of Russia and other nations of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Hewett was President Bush's special assistant and senior adviser for Russian and Eurasian affairs. He joined the NSC staff in 1991 and recently received a special exceptional service award from Bush.
NEWS
June 21, 1997
Joseph Grunwald, 76, founding president of the Institute of the Americas at UC San Diego. An economist, Grunwald was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington from 1963 to 1984. He took a leave of absence from the position in 1976 and 1977 to serve as deputy assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs. He was named the first president of the Institute of the Americas in 1984 and during his four-year tenure built it into a major center for dialogue among the Americas.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2000
More than 75 real estate leaders will examine the trends shaping the real estate industry at a daylong conference June 7 at the Regal Biltmore Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. The "Trends 2000 Conference," presented by the Urban Land Institute Los Angeles District Council and the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate and sponsored by The Times, will feature six interactive discussions in large forums and 12 smaller concurrent sessions.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2013 | By Shan Li
TIJUANA - In an industrial park five miles east of downtown Tijuana, Ariel Ceja toils in a white room bustling with assembly workers hunched over blue tables. A master scheduler, Ceja is in charge of all steps of production at this factory nestled inside a cavernous warehouse. A cluster of anonymous buildings surround the facility. Nearby are pitted roads, and just a few minutes away by car is the Tijuana airport and a university. San Diego-based 3D Robotics moved into this once-vacant spot in June, producing affordable drones and electronic parts destined for customers in the U.S. and around the world.
OPINION
July 3, 2012 | By Kenneth Lieberthal and Michael O'Hanlon
Drones, kill lists, computer viruses and administration leaks are all the rage in the current political debate. They indeed merit serious scrutiny at a time when the rules of war, and technologies available for war, are changing fast. That said, these issues are not the foreign policy centerpiece of the 2012 presidential race. Economic renewal and fiscal reform have become the preeminent issues, not only for domestic and economic policy but for foreign policy as well. As the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm.Michael G. Mullen, was fond of saying, national debt has become perhaps our top national security threat.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - When the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court began in 1978, it was seen as a smart compromise aimed at protecting both national security and civil liberties. Before, the FBI under Director J. Edgar Hoover or the U.S. attorney general could use secret wiretaps to compile damaging dossiers on perceived enemies, including politicians and activists. Under the new law, the FBI or the CIA had to go before a judge of the special court if it wanted to wiretap an "agent of a foreign power" in this country, such as a Soviet spy. These days, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court is more often seen as a good idea gone sour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Los Angeles is among the top 10 U.S. cities with the widest gulf between the rich and poor, a Washington think tank reported Thursday. The upper 5% of Los Angeles residents earned more than 12 times what the bottom 20% took in,  Alan Barube, who studies social policies affecting low-income families for the Brookings Institution, said in a paper . The income spread was similar in New York City, Washington, Oakland, Chicago and Baltimore, he...
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