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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000
Propelled by a booming local economy, Orange County is leading the way in California's campaign to remove aid recipients from the welfare rolls, according to a study to be released today by a Washington think tank. The Brookings Institution report found that Orange County reduced its welfare rolls by 42% since 1994, recording the biggest drop in Southern California and the second-largest statewide behind Santa Clara County in the Silicon Valley.
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NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Americans are getting married at ever-older ages, and a new report says this trend may be partly responsible for the shrinking of the middle class. On average, brides are 26.5 years old and grooms are 28.7 when they head to the alter, according to the authors of the report, “Knot Yet,” which was released Friday by the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia and collaborators. Those ages represent historic highs. For college-educated men and women, delaying marriage has paid off - literally.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Despite concerns about U.S.-made drones ending up in enemy hands, American military contractors are lobbying the government to loosen export restrictions and open up foreign markets to the unmanned aircraft that have reshaped modern warfare. Companies such as Northrop Grumman Corp.and other arms makers are eager to tap a growing foreign appetite for high-tech - and relatively cheap - drones, already being sold on the world market by countries such as Israel and China. "Export restrictions are hurting this industry in America without making us any safer," Wesley G. Bush, Northrop's chief executive, said at a defense conference this year.
WORLD
June 9, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
As drug cartels wreak murderous havoc from Mexico to Panama, the Obama administration is unable to show that the billions of dollars spent in the war on drugs have significantly stemmed the flow of illegal narcotics into the United States, according to two government reports and outside experts. The reports specifically criticize the government's growing use of U.S. contractors, which were paid more than $3 billion to train local prosecutors and police, help eradicate fields of coca, operate surveillance equipment and otherwise battle the widening drug trade in Latin America over the last five years.
OPINION
February 16, 2014 | By Michael O'Hanlon
For decades, one golden rule has guided America's military involvement in Africa: Stay out. Generally speaking, the reason was a sense that the strategic stakes did not justify the risk. When we deviated from this rule, we often learned lessons the hard way that seemed to reinforce its validity, as in Somalia in 1993. And while presidents often profess a stronger interest in Africa than their actions would imply, they tend to say such things when not in the White House - witness Bill Clinton calling the nonintervention in Rwanda's 1994 genocide his greatest regret as president, or Sen. Barack Obama calling for more assertiveness in the Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC, and Sudan six to eight years ago. But, in fact, now is the time to reassess this long-standing American anathema to military involvement in Africa's terrible wars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1991
Although Shaw chooses to conclude his series by stating that "it would be rank sexism to suggest that reporters of either sex have a monopoly on intelligence, sensitivity, frankness or virtually any other quality," the slant of his second article, it seems to me, is that there is something called "a female perspective" that can affect the production of news. He writes, for example, "Perhaps it is no wonder then that most male editors tend to be more squeamish and more ambivalent about coverage of sexually charged issues than do most women."
BUSINESS
October 18, 1992
It's incredible that Alice M. Rivlin, a supposedly learned member of the Brookings Institution, doesn't seem to know that U.S. Presidents can't spend a penny, or raise or lower taxes, unless it has been approved by Congress, "Why Bush's Congress Bashing on Federal Spending Just Doesn't Add Up" (Sept. 27). Democrats have controlled Congress for most of the last 40 years. And the "mandated" spending she speaks of as virtually untouchable could be "un-mandated" by Congress if they had the courage and integrity to do what's best for the country instead of doing what it takes to get reelected.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2001 | Stuart Silverstein
Researchers from USC and the Brookings Institution think tank will issue a report today urging Southern California community leaders to combat the problems of sprawl by developing coordinated regional growth policies. Among other things, the report calls for efforts to encourage home building and job creation in the region's aging communities, where many poor and low-income workers are concentrated.
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