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Brookings Institution

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1991
Although Shaw chooses to conclude his series by stating that "it would be rank sexism to suggest that reporters of either sex have a monopoly on intelligence, sensitivity, frankness or virtually any other quality," the slant of his second article, it seems to me, is that there is something called "a female perspective" that can affect the production of news. He writes, for example, "Perhaps it is no wonder then that most male editors tend to be more squeamish and more ambivalent about coverage of sexually charged issues than do most women."
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BUSINESS
October 18, 1992
It's incredible that Alice M. Rivlin, a supposedly learned member of the Brookings Institution, doesn't seem to know that U.S. Presidents can't spend a penny, or raise or lower taxes, unless it has been approved by Congress, "Why Bush's Congress Bashing on Federal Spending Just Doesn't Add Up" (Sept. 27). Democrats have controlled Congress for most of the last 40 years. And the "mandated" spending she speaks of as virtually untouchable could be "un-mandated" by Congress if they had the courage and integrity to do what's best for the country instead of doing what it takes to get reelected.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2001 | Stuart Silverstein
Researchers from USC and the Brookings Institution think tank will issue a report today urging Southern California community leaders to combat the problems of sprawl by developing coordinated regional growth policies. Among other things, the report calls for efforts to encourage home building and job creation in the region's aging communities, where many poor and low-income workers are concentrated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1985 | Associated Press
Richard V. Gilbert, an economics adviser in President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Administration, has died at home at age 83. He had been ill with cancer and suffered a heart attack 10 days before his death last Sunday. Gilbert served as a speechwriter for Roosevelt on economic issues during World War II. Economist Walter Salant of the Brookings Institution in Washington once called Gilbert "the outstanding, unsung hero of American wartime economic policy."
NEWS
January 18, 1993
Ed A. Hewett, 50, a National Security Council staff member considered an authority on the economies of Russia and other nations of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Hewett was President Bush's special assistant and senior adviser for Russian and Eurasian affairs. He joined the NSC staff in 1991 and recently received a special exceptional service award from Bush.
NEWS
June 21, 1997
Joseph Grunwald, 76, founding president of the Institute of the Americas at UC San Diego. An economist, Grunwald was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington from 1963 to 1984. He took a leave of absence from the position in 1976 and 1977 to serve as deputy assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs. He was named the first president of the Institute of the Americas in 1984 and during his four-year tenure built it into a major center for dialogue among the Americas.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2000
More than 75 real estate leaders will examine the trends shaping the real estate industry at a daylong conference June 7 at the Regal Biltmore Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. The "Trends 2000 Conference," presented by the Urban Land Institute Los Angeles District Council and the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate and sponsored by The Times, will feature six interactive discussions in large forums and 12 smaller concurrent sessions.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2002 | Alan C. Miller and Kevin Sack, Times Staff Writers
Though many had died flying the Harrier, Marine Corps pilot Peter E. Yount never thought it would let him down. He knew the attack jet well and was devoted to it. In the entire U.S. arsenal, only the compact, muscular-looking Harrier could lift straight up off a runway, hover like a hummingbird, then blast off in search of targets. "Difficult but honest" is how Yount described it. But on a clear spring day in 1998, the Harrier would betray him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Los Angeles is among the top 10 U.S. cities with the widest gulf between the rich and poor, a Washington think tank reported Thursday. The upper 5% of Los Angeles residents earned more than 12 times what the bottom 20% took in,  Alan Barube, who studies social policies affecting low-income families for the Brookings Institution, said in a paper . The income spread was similar in New York City, Washington, Oakland, Chicago and Baltimore, he...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Despite staggering rates of unemployment, the Inland Empire continued to pull tens of thousands of people from Los Angeles County during the recession and its aftermath - the nation's biggest net county-to-county movement from 2007 to 2011 - new Census Bureau estimates reveal. Roughly 35,000 more people poured into the Inland Empire from Los Angeles County than moved in the opposite direction. The migration occurred even as Riverside and San Bernardino counties lost some 144,000 jobs.
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