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Brookings Institution

October 18, 1992
It's incredible that Alice M. Rivlin, a supposedly learned member of the Brookings Institution, doesn't seem to know that U.S. Presidents can't spend a penny, or raise or lower taxes, unless it has been approved by Congress, "Why Bush's Congress Bashing on Federal Spending Just Doesn't Add Up" (Sept. 27). Democrats have controlled Congress for most of the last 40 years. And the "mandated" spending she speaks of as virtually untouchable could be "un-mandated" by Congress if they had the courage and integrity to do what's best for the country instead of doing what it takes to get reelected.
March 7, 2001 | Stuart Silverstein
Researchers from USC and the Brookings Institution think tank will issue a report today urging Southern California community leaders to combat the problems of sprawl by developing coordinated regional growth policies. Among other things, the report calls for efforts to encourage home building and job creation in the region's aging communities, where many poor and low-income workers are concentrated.
October 13, 1985 | Associated Press
Richard V. Gilbert, an economics adviser in President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Administration, has died at home at age 83. He had been ill with cancer and suffered a heart attack 10 days before his death last Sunday. Gilbert served as a speechwriter for Roosevelt on economic issues during World War II. Economist Walter Salant of the Brookings Institution in Washington once called Gilbert "the outstanding, unsung hero of American wartime economic policy."
January 18, 1993
Ed A. Hewett, 50, a National Security Council staff member considered an authority on the economies of Russia and other nations of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Hewett was President Bush's special assistant and senior adviser for Russian and Eurasian affairs. He joined the NSC staff in 1991 and recently received a special exceptional service award from Bush.
June 21, 1997
Joseph Grunwald, 76, founding president of the Institute of the Americas at UC San Diego. An economist, Grunwald was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington from 1963 to 1984. He took a leave of absence from the position in 1976 and 1977 to serve as deputy assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs. He was named the first president of the Institute of the Americas in 1984 and during his four-year tenure built it into a major center for dialogue among the Americas.
May 30, 2000
More than 75 real estate leaders will examine the trends shaping the real estate industry at a daylong conference June 7 at the Regal Biltmore Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. The "Trends 2000 Conference," presented by the Urban Land Institute Los Angeles District Council and the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate and sponsored by The Times, will feature six interactive discussions in large forums and 12 smaller concurrent sessions.
December 23, 1996
I read with interest and amusement in "New Movement Plots More Civil Way of Living" (Dec. 15) that the Brookings Institution wishes to study "what ... has government done to erode ... neighborhood and community insti- tutions." Is it the government that wants to push wages so low that people must work two jobs or heavy overtime just to get by, and so are forced to neglect their families? Is it the government that keeps rents and property values as high as the market will bear? Is it the government that exports jobs to low-wage countries, leading to wage slavery overseas and poverty at home, with attendant crime and disorder?
June 3, 2012 | By Kay S. Hymowitz
The single-mother revolution shouldn't need much introduction. It started in the 1960s when the nation began to sever the historical connection between marriage and childbearing and to turn single motherhood and the fatherless family into a viable, even welcome, arrangement for children and for society. The reasons for the shift were many, including the sexual revolution, a powerful strain of anti-marriage feminism and a "super bug" of American individualism that hit the country in the 1960s and '70s.
July 2, 1995 | Associated Press
Pamela C. Harriman, the U.S. ambassador to France, will pay millions of dollars into two charitable trusts depleted by bad investments to avoid a conflict with the Internal Revenue Service, her attorney said Saturday. "Mrs. Harriman is committed to replenish the full amount that is determined to be owed to those trusts," said attorney William J. Perlstein. He estimated the amount at $4.5 million. Harriman is embroiled in long-running legal disputes with the heirs of her late husband, W.
December 21, 2010 | By Seema Mehta, Tom Hamburger and Kim Geiger, Los Angeles Times
The nation's population and political heft continued to swing toward the South and West in the 2010 census, but for the first time since statehood, California's population did not grow enough to gain additional congressional seats, the U.S. Census Bureau said Tuesday. As it has since the last reapportionment 10 years ago, the state will continue to have 53 members in the House of Representatives ? by far the largest bloc. California gained about 3.4 million residents over the decade, a 10% growth rate that closely tracked the national rate.
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