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Brookings Institution

BUSINESS
October 18, 1992
It's incredible that Alice M. Rivlin, a supposedly learned member of the Brookings Institution, doesn't seem to know that U.S. Presidents can't spend a penny, or raise or lower taxes, unless it has been approved by Congress, "Why Bush's Congress Bashing on Federal Spending Just Doesn't Add Up" (Sept. 27). Democrats have controlled Congress for most of the last 40 years. And the "mandated" spending she speaks of as virtually untouchable could be "un-mandated" by Congress if they had the courage and integrity to do what's best for the country instead of doing what it takes to get reelected.
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BUSINESS
March 7, 2001 | Stuart Silverstein
Researchers from USC and the Brookings Institution think tank will issue a report today urging Southern California community leaders to combat the problems of sprawl by developing coordinated regional growth policies. Among other things, the report calls for efforts to encourage home building and job creation in the region's aging communities, where many poor and low-income workers are concentrated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1985 | Associated Press
Richard V. Gilbert, an economics adviser in President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Administration, has died at home at age 83. He had been ill with cancer and suffered a heart attack 10 days before his death last Sunday. Gilbert served as a speechwriter for Roosevelt on economic issues during World War II. Economist Walter Salant of the Brookings Institution in Washington once called Gilbert "the outstanding, unsung hero of American wartime economic policy."
NEWS
January 18, 1993
Ed A. Hewett, 50, a National Security Council staff member considered an authority on the economies of Russia and other nations of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Hewett was President Bush's special assistant and senior adviser for Russian and Eurasian affairs. He joined the NSC staff in 1991 and recently received a special exceptional service award from Bush.
NEWS
June 21, 1997
Joseph Grunwald, 76, founding president of the Institute of the Americas at UC San Diego. An economist, Grunwald was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington from 1963 to 1984. He took a leave of absence from the position in 1976 and 1977 to serve as deputy assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs. He was named the first president of the Institute of the Americas in 1984 and during his four-year tenure built it into a major center for dialogue among the Americas.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2000
More than 75 real estate leaders will examine the trends shaping the real estate industry at a daylong conference June 7 at the Regal Biltmore Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. The "Trends 2000 Conference," presented by the Urban Land Institute Los Angeles District Council and the USC Lusk Center for Real Estate and sponsored by The Times, will feature six interactive discussions in large forums and 12 smaller concurrent sessions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Los Angeles is among the top 10 U.S. cities with the widest gulf between the rich and poor, a Washington think tank reported Thursday. The upper 5% of Los Angeles residents earned more than 12 times what the bottom 20% took in,  Alan Barube, who studies social policies affecting low-income families for the Brookings Institution, said in a paper . The income spread was similar in New York City, Washington, Oakland, Chicago and Baltimore, he...
OPINION
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Hart and Norman Augustine
In February 2001, a bipartisan federal commission on which we served warned that terrorists would acquire weapons of mass destruction and mass disruption. "Attacks against American citizens on American soil, possibly causing heavy casualties, are likely over the next quarter-century," the Hart-Rudman Commission said. "In the face of this threat, our nation has no coherent or integrated governmental structures. " We added: "Congress should rationalize its current committee structure so that it best serves U.S. national security objectives.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2003 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Even by the standards of the Nixon White House, the plan to blow up Washington's preeminent think tank seemed crazy, presidential counselor John W. Dean III recalled here Monday. But there was White House aide John Ehrlichman on the phone one day in 1971, telling Dean that "Chuck Colson wants me to firebomb the Brookings [Institution]." Describing the incident Monday to several hundred presidential history junkies at the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum, Dean said he was dumbfounded.
WORLD
June 9, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
As drug cartels wreak murderous havoc from Mexico to Panama, the Obama administration is unable to show that the billions of dollars spent in the war on drugs have significantly stemmed the flow of illegal narcotics into the United States, according to two government reports and outside experts. The reports specifically criticize the government's growing use of U.S. contractors, which were paid more than $3 billion to train local prosecutors and police, help eradicate fields of coca, operate surveillance equipment and otherwise battle the widening drug trade in Latin America over the last five years.
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