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FOOD
April 13, 2013
The best thing I've made with Parmesan broth recently was a kind of cross between a stew and a pasta that paired goat cheese ravioli and spring vegetables. I used asparagus tips and sugar snap peas for this recipe, but I've also made similar dishes with English peas, fava beans, shaved radishes and even bolted lettuce from the garden. The only part that's even a little tricky is making the ravioli. If that intimidates you (and it shouldn't … it takes less than an hour of work and it's actually really fun)
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FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Culling my bookshelves recently, I came across my much-thumbed copy of "Unmentionable Cuisine" and remembered the dinners, years ago, that Bonnie Hughes of the late Augusta's Restaurant in Berkeley organized with author Calvin W. Schwabe. The menus read something like this: deep-fried turkey testicles with Parmesan, baked lamb eyes with truffles and shiitake, veal brains in coconut cream, intestine dumplings, and fried crickets and peanuts - and that's just for appetizers. Main dishes included red-cooked duck tongues, whole stuffed frog, grilled guinea pig, and grilled rattlesnake marinated in whiskey, ginger and soy. The dinners had the thrill of the illicit, and everyone had a merry time.
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FOOD
July 29, 2010
  Peking duck broth with nappa cabbage Total time: 1 1/2 hours Servings: 4 Note: Ending a meal with soup may seem unusual, but this vegetable laden-soup serves as a simple and cleansing bookend to the sumptuous Peking duck dinner. Doctoring up canned broth with the duck bones is a time saver that doesn't compromise flavor. Neck, wing joints and feet leftover from prepping duck for Peking duck recipe 4 cups chicken broth 3 cups water Chubby 11/2-inch section fresh ginger, peeled, halved lengthwise and smashed with the broad side of a knife 3 large green onions, cut into 3-inch lengths and lightly bruised with the broad side of a knife Carcass from roasted Peking duck 1 pound nappa cabbage, cut lengthwise into thick wedges, cored and cut crosswise into 3/4-inch-wide strips Salt Pounded Sichuan peppercorns or ground white pepper 3 to 4 cilantro sprigs, roughly chopped, for garnish 1. Use a cleaver or heavy knife to chop the neck, wing joints and feet at 1-inch intervals.
FOOD
November 23, 2013
Basic bread stuffing 1 hour 20 minutes. Serves 10 to 12 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter 1 large onion 1 to 2 cups celery leaves, diced 12 cups toasted ½-inch bread cubes 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 tablespoon dried sage or ¼ cup minced fresh sage 1/2 cup chopped parsley 1 cup turkey stock, water or milk Melt butter in large stockpot. Add onion and celery and cook until vegetables are tender but not browned. Add to bread cubes in large bowl.
FOOD
April 13, 2013
  2 hours. Serves 6 2 cups chicken broth 2 cups water 2 cloves garlic, sliced 1 1/2 to 2 ounces rinds from Parmigiano-Reggiano Herb trimmings Salt 2 dozen asparagus tips 1/2 pound sugar snap peas Goat cheese ravioli or fresh pasta squares 2 tablespoons chopped chives 1 ounce freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano 1. In a soup pot, simmer the chicken broth, water, garlic, Parmesan rinds and herb...
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Culling my bookshelves recently, I came across my much-thumbed copy of "Unmentionable Cuisine" and remembered the dinners, years ago, that Bonnie Hughes of the late Augusta's Restaurant in Berkeley organized with author Calvin W. Schwabe. The menus read something like this: deep-fried turkey testicles with Parmesan, baked lamb eyes with truffles and shiitake, veal brains in coconut cream, intestine dumplings, and fried crickets and peanuts - and that's just for appetizers. Main dishes included red-cooked duck tongues, whole stuffed frog, grilled guinea pig, and grilled rattlesnake marinated in whiskey, ginger and soy. The dinners had the thrill of the illicit, and everyone had a merry time.
FOOD
December 13, 1990 | FAYE LEVY, Levy is the author of "Sensational Pasta," published by HP Books. and
Italian cooks know that one of the best ways to showcase their superb stuffed pastas is to serve them in clear soups. In fact, most restaurant menus in Italy begin with a whole category of dishes called pasta in brodo, or pasta in broth. For some reason, Americans have concentrated on pastas in sauce. Yet pasta in broth deserves to be equally familiar to us. When served in a fine soup, pasta is tasty and usually lower in calories than if tossed with sauce.
FOOD
February 3, 2011 | By C. Thi Nguyen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Tonkotsu is the heart of the matter at Ramen Yamadaya, an unassuming little ramen shop in Torrance squeezed between a skate shop and the 405 Freeway. Proper tonkotsu broth is made by simmering pork bones for the better part of the day, and the result is a lush, intensified, liquefied pork. A good tonkotsu broth feels like a crushed velvet smoothie. Yamadaya's tonkotsu broth looks promising: cloudy, dense with porky particulate. A first sip doesn't disappoint, revealing a sensuous version of tonkotsu broth — almost fuzzy, like drinking a pork Snuggie.
FOOD
August 29, 2007 | By Denise Martin, Special to The Times
Summer in Koreatown has long been marked by the sounds of slurping. The season for naeng myun -- cold noodles -- is now in full swing, and at restaurants across the neighborhood, huge bowlfuls of chewy buckwheat noodles quickly disappear. Occasionally there are pauses for a spoonful of icy-cold tangy broth, a bite of crunchy pickled daikon or cucumber, a sliver of crisp-sweet Asian pear, or a slice of tender beef brisket. Naeng myun is a light, refreshing dish from North Korea especially popular during the humid summers of the Korean peninsula's monsoon season.
FOOD
April 13, 2013 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times
Here in California we love to brag about our abundance of wonderful seasonal ingredients and how that makes good food easy. That's more or less true, but I have to confess that I've also always had a sneaking admiration for those cooks who can whip up something from nothing. Sure, it's wonderful to be able to just pick up a sack of Ojai Pixie mandarins and a box of medjool dates and call it dessert. But you've really got to admire someone who can take a couple of wilted zucchinis, a sprouting onion and some canned tomatoes and turn that into something delicious - the real-life equivalent of the proverbial stone soup.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
Bacon. It may be most traditional served at the breakfast table, but there's no reason bacon can't shine any time of day. Whether it's the star of a dish or simply lending its rich flavor in a supporting role, here are three perfect options for dinner. This velvety risotto incorporates the deep flavor of applewood-smoked bacon with Arborio rice cooked to perfectly creamy consistency. Fresh chopped chives and grated Parmigiano-Reggiano lend bright color and subtle tang, and a fresh egg yolk is nestled into each hot portion right before serving for added richness.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Laura E. Davis
As supermarkets try to figure out how to cut down on waste and experiment with alternative forms of energy,  Kroger Co. says it's doing both simultaneously by turning landfill-bound organic matter into electricity that powers its stores, The Times' Tiffany Hsu reports . An August report from the Natural Resources Defense Council found that 40% of food in the U.S. goes uneaten. When that 20 pounds of food per person per month ends up in landfills, it contributes to 25% of the country's methane emissions.
FOOD
May 11, 2013
Bulgur pilaf with asparagus, mushrooms and tarragon 2 hours. Serves 4 as a side dish 1 (1-pound) bunch medium asparagus 1/2 pound button mushrooms 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon chopped fresh tarragon (stems reserved), or to taste, plus more for garnishing 2 tablespoons chopped Italian parsley (stems reserved), plus more for garnishing 3 cups water or light vegetable broth Salt 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided, plus more for drizzling 2 tablespoons butter or additional olive oil, divided 1 onion, finely chopped (about 1 1/3 cups)
FOOD
April 20, 2013 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: In the heat of August, I stopped for lunch at Paper or Plastik Cafe . I had the most amazing cold borscht. It was light and refreshing and full-flavored and, like my bubby's, only distilled down to the essence of borscht. Is there any chance you could get Paper or Plastik to share the recipe? Katya Culberg Los Angeles Dear Katya: A quick glance at that signature shade of red, and this might look like any run-of-the-mill borscht. But one bite and you're hit with a medley of flavors: a subtle hint of spice, the smokey hint of applewood-smoked bacon and the slight tang of quick-pickled beets.
FOOD
April 13, 2013
The best thing I've made with Parmesan broth recently was a kind of cross between a stew and a pasta that paired goat cheese ravioli and spring vegetables. I used asparagus tips and sugar snap peas for this recipe, but I've also made similar dishes with English peas, fava beans, shaved radishes and even bolted lettuce from the garden. The only part that's even a little tricky is making the ravioli. If that intimidates you (and it shouldn't … it takes less than an hour of work and it's actually really fun)
FOOD
April 13, 2013 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times
Here in California we love to brag about our abundance of wonderful seasonal ingredients and how that makes good food easy. That's more or less true, but I have to confess that I've also always had a sneaking admiration for those cooks who can whip up something from nothing. Sure, it's wonderful to be able to just pick up a sack of Ojai Pixie mandarins and a box of medjool dates and call it dessert. But you've really got to admire someone who can take a couple of wilted zucchinis, a sprouting onion and some canned tomatoes and turn that into something delicious - the real-life equivalent of the proverbial stone soup.
FOOD
November 11, 2010 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
  Dear SOS, I'd love to learn how they make the avgolemono soup at Taverna Tony in Malibu. It's scrumptious. Thanks for any help you might be able to provide! Megan Huard Woodland Hills Dear Megan: Taverna Tony was happy to share its recipe, which we've adapted below. Get baking: Have a favorite holiday cookie recipe? We want it. Join us for the first L.A. Times holiday cookie bake-off. Avgolemono soup Total time: 45 minutes Servings: 6 to 8 Note: Adapted from Taverna Tony in Malibu 2 1/2 quarts chicken broth, divided 1 small chicken breast 1 cup rice 3 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon cornstarch 1/4 cup cold water 3 egg yolks Juice of 1 lemon, more to taste Salt 1. In a medium saucepan, bring 3 cups chicken broth to a boil.
FOOD
October 27, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: We went to Santa Barbara and had very good lunch at Four Seasons-Biltmore. We wanted to order a vegetarian meal, and there it was on the menu, eggplant osso buco. You usually think of osso buco as meat, but that was eggplant in that shape of osso buco. It was served on a puree, drizzled with olive oil.... Delicious! I haven't been able to stop thinking about it since. Would it be possible to get the recipe? Danielle Pacholczyk Pasadena Dear Danielle: One look, and I would never have guessed this dish was vegetarian.
FOOD
April 13, 2013
  2 hours. Serves 6 2 cups chicken broth 2 cups water 2 cloves garlic, sliced 1 1/2 to 2 ounces rinds from Parmigiano-Reggiano Herb trimmings Salt 2 dozen asparagus tips 1/2 pound sugar snap peas Goat cheese ravioli or fresh pasta squares 2 tablespoons chopped chives 1 ounce freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano 1. In a soup pot, simmer the chicken broth, water, garlic, Parmesan rinds and herb...
NEWS
March 17, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
This week's Culinary SOS request comes from Lynne Mitchell in La Cañada-Flintridge: "I love the delicious short ribs served at Kendall's Brasserie , the Music Center restaurant run by Patina. The ribs are so flavorful, meaty and tender. Please, please try to get Patina to share the recipe. " This dish may take a bit of time, but patience yields the most tender, buttery rich ribs. Kendall's Brasserie was happy to share its recipe, which we've adapted below. I loved them so much, I think I'll be making them again this weekend.
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