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NEWS
May 29, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a Salinas library named for Cesar Chavez and set in a neighborhood populated by the farm workers who were his followers, a peace treaty will be signed today between the labor union that Chavez founded and an agribusiness giant that was once among the union's bitterest adversaries. Leaders of the United Farm Workers and Salinas-based Bruce Church Inc., the nation's third-largest lettuce grower, have reached agreement on a contract that ends nearly two decades of strife and litigation.
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NEWS
May 29, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a Salinas library named for Cesar Chavez and set in a neighborhood populated by the farm workers who were his followers, a peace treaty will be signed today between the labor union that Chavez founded and an agribusiness giant that was once among the union's bitterest adversaries. Leaders of the United Farm Workers and Salinas-based Bruce Church Inc., the nation's third-largest lettuce grower, have reached agreement on a contract that ends nearly two decades of strife and litigation.
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NEWS
July 10, 1987
The U.S. Department of Labor announced that it has barred Bruce Church Inc., a major Salinas lettuce grower, from receiving any more federal contracts because the firm failed to have an affirmative-action plan for hiring minorities, women and others. Church, which held a blanket purchase agreement with the Defense Department, will have that contract canceled and will not be eligible for any future contracts or extensions of existing contracts until it complies with three federal laws.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two-decade struggle between the farm workers union founded by Cesar Chavez and a Salinas-based agribusiness giant has apparently ended with a multimillion-dollar lawsuit being dropped and a tentative labor agreement being reached. The bitter fight between the United Farm Workers and Bruce Church Inc., the nation's third-largest lettuce grower, has been fought in the fields, the courts and at the hearing rooms of the state Agricultural Labor Relations Board since the 1970s.
NEWS
April 9, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
For the second time in a year, the United Farm Workers Union has been stung by a major court decision ordering it to pay a huge damage award to a farm owner. A Yuma, Ariz., jury awarded $5.4 million in damages to Bruce Church Inc., a Salinas-based firm, late Wednesday. The decision stemmed from a 1984 suit alleging that the UFW violated Arizona's secondary boycott law in connection with a boycott the union waged against Church lettuce starting in 1979.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The $9.7-million damage suit against the United Farm Workers that consumed Cesar Chavez's final days is nearing a decision, with the union that he built facing possible bankruptcy and disarray if a jury sides with a major lettuce grower. Union loyalists awaiting a verdict have held rallies outside the courthouse where Chavez completed a second day of grueling testimony just hours before he died April 22. Many are bitter that the suit by agribusiness giant Bruce Church Inc.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a legal victory for the United Farm Workers union, an appeals court in Arizona on Wednesday threw out a $3.7-million judgment against the union won by a major lettuce grower, the latest twist in a protracted court battle that Cesar Chavez was fighting the day he died. In a ruling made public Wednesday, the appeals court in Phoenix found that the trial judge in Yuma was wrong in giving jury instructions that were preferential to the Salinas-based Bruce Church Inc.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a trial permeated by the memory of Cesar Chavez, a jury found the United Farm Workers Union guilty Thursday of outrageous conduct during a lettuce boycott but awarded the grower less than a third of the monetary damages it wanted. An official with Salinas-based Bruce Church Inc. said the verdict vindicated the company's view that the union engaged in illegal and malicious conduct in persuading grocery chains to drop Church lettuce in the 1980s.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two-decade struggle between the farm workers union founded by Cesar Chavez and a Salinas-based agribusiness giant has apparently ended with a multimillion-dollar lawsuit being dropped and a tentative labor agreement being reached. The bitter fight between the United Farm Workers and Bruce Church Inc., the nation's third-largest lettuce grower, has been fought in the fields, the courts and at the hearing rooms of the state Agricultural Labor Relations Board since the 1970s.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a legal victory for the United Farm Workers union, an appeals court in Arizona on Wednesday threw out a $3.7-million judgment against the union won by a major lettuce grower, the latest twist in a protracted court battle that Cesar Chavez was fighting the day he died. In a ruling made public Wednesday, the appeals court in Phoenix found that the trial judge in Yuma was wrong in giving jury instructions that were preferential to the Salinas-based Bruce Church Inc.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a trial permeated by the memory of Cesar Chavez, a jury found the United Farm Workers Union guilty Thursday of outrageous conduct during a lettuce boycott but awarded the grower less than a third of the monetary damages it wanted. An official with Salinas-based Bruce Church Inc. said the verdict vindicated the company's view that the union engaged in illegal and malicious conduct in persuading grocery chains to drop Church lettuce in the 1980s.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The $9.7-million damage suit against the United Farm Workers that consumed Cesar Chavez's final days is nearing a decision, with the union that he built facing possible bankruptcy and disarray if a jury sides with a major lettuce grower. Union loyalists awaiting a verdict have held rallies outside the courthouse where Chavez completed a second day of grueling testimony just hours before he died April 22. Many are bitter that the suit by agribusiness giant Bruce Church Inc.
NEWS
April 9, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
For the second time in a year, the United Farm Workers Union has been stung by a major court decision ordering it to pay a huge damage award to a farm owner. A Yuma, Ariz., jury awarded $5.4 million in damages to Bruce Church Inc., a Salinas-based firm, late Wednesday. The decision stemmed from a 1984 suit alleging that the UFW violated Arizona's secondary boycott law in connection with a boycott the union waged against Church lettuce starting in 1979.
NEWS
July 10, 1987
The U.S. Department of Labor announced that it has barred Bruce Church Inc., a major Salinas lettuce grower, from receiving any more federal contracts because the firm failed to have an affirmative-action plan for hiring minorities, women and others. Church, which held a blanket purchase agreement with the Defense Department, will have that contract canceled and will not be eligible for any future contracts or extensions of existing contracts until it complies with three federal laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
Shoppers around the country are paying more for iceberg lettuce--and getting less for their money--because of flooding in Arizona and unusually warm weather earlier this year. Swelled by runoff from heavy rain, the Gila River has swamped thousands of acres in the past two weeks in Yuma County, which provides about two-thirds of the nation's winter iceberg lettuce. Checks with supermarkets in Indianapolis, Los Angeles and Bergenfield, N.J., found shoppers were paying $1.
NEWS
April 24, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, Cesar Chavez returned to his birthplace, where the loss of a family farm half a century ago changed his life. Chavez, 66, had come to his native Yuma to fight a lawsuit brought against the United Farm Workers by Bruce Church Inc., a Salinas-based vegetable producer. For Chavez, the fight was intensely personal. Bruce Church Inc. has extensive holdings in California and Arizona, including the acreage on the Gila River east of Yuma that was once owned by Chavez's parents.
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