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Bruce Perlowin

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NEWS
January 26, 1992 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bruce Perlowin's resume is a little different. Splashed across the top is a bold headline: "Ex-Marijuana Kingpin Needs a Job." Beneath that is a quote from a magazine: "Rather than wait years to move up through the corporate ranks, Bruce Perlowin parlayed a knack for organization into the largest drug-smuggling operation in West Coast history. . . . His management skills were formidable, his attention to detail legendary."
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NEWS
January 26, 1992 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bruce Perlowin's resume is a little different. Splashed across the top is a bold headline: "Ex-Marijuana Kingpin Needs a Job." Beneath that is a quote from a magazine: "Rather than wait years to move up through the corporate ranks, Bruce Perlowin parlayed a knack for organization into the largest drug-smuggling operation in West Coast history. . . . His management skills were formidable, his attention to detail legendary."
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NEWS
February 7, 1992
Bruce Perlowin, a convicted big-time drug smuggler who admitted his illegal expertise in an unusual resume, has landed a job. The resume, which began with the headline: "Ex-Marijuana Kingpin Needs a Job," helped Perlowin get a $25,000-a-year position as national sales manager for the Rainforest Products company in Mill Valley.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1992 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out of work for months and tired of mailing out resumes, Lee Snorteland decided to try something new to get a job. The San Jose electrical engineer, who lives next to U.S. 101, started putting up "hire me" billboards in his back yard. Maybe, he figured, a motorist passing by would have a job opening. "Some may have thought it was corny and perhaps that's not the type of engineer they wanted on board," said Snorteland, 37. But, he added, "I had to try something."
NEWS
November 28, 1985 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
At first glance, Bruce Perlowin seems rather mousy--slight, bespectacled, soft-spoken, with a scraggly beard and tangled hair tied back in a ponytail--sort of a leftover flower child from the '60s. He talks about the love-ins, about "everyone sitting around in the sun, getting to know each other, listening to the band playing." He says that his great dream was "to raise the consciousness of the planet"--through yoga and "smoking a little pot."
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