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Bruce Thiesen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2001 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filling a Cabinet-level position that had been vacant for 18 months, Gov. Gray Davis on Wednesday appointed Bruce Thiesen, temporary secretary of the troubled Department of Veterans Affairs, as permanent secretary. Thiesen has occupied the post on an interim basis since May 2000, when Secretary Tomas Alvarado resigned after the death at the Barstow Veterans Home of a World War II infantry sergeant who choked on his lunch.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2002 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bruce Thiesen, the man Gov. Gray Davis appointed 10 months ago to head the embattled Department of Veterans Affairs, must leave the post in November on orders of the state Senate. Davis, who calls himself California's "most veteran-friendly" governor, now must find his fourth secretary of Veterans Affairs in as many years. Thiesen is being forced to vacate the $131,412-a-year job because he can serve for only one year without Senate confirmation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2002 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Claiming that services of the Department of Veterans Affairs have deteriorated, leaders in the state Senate are pressuring Gov. Gray Davis to withdraw his appointment of Bruce Thiesen as the agency's secretary. In a letter to Davis, Senate Leader John L. Burton (D-San Francisco) said he believes there are not enough votes in the Senate to confirm Thiesen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2002 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Claiming that services of the Department of Veterans Affairs have deteriorated, leaders in the state Senate are pressuring Gov. Gray Davis to withdraw his appointment of Bruce Thiesen as the agency's secretary. In a letter to Davis, Senate Leader John L. Burton (D-San Francisco) said he believes there are not enough votes in the Senate to confirm Thiesen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2002 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bruce Thiesen, the man Gov. Gray Davis appointed 10 months ago to head the embattled Department of Veterans Affairs, must leave the post in November on orders of the state Senate. Davis, who calls himself California's "most veteran-friendly" governor, now must find his fourth secretary of Veterans Affairs in as many years. Thiesen is being forced to vacate the $131,412-a-year job because he can serve for only one year without Senate confirmation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2000 | Sharon Nagy, (949) 248-2168
Heisler Park will be the setting of a Memorial Day celebration to honor veterans who have died. "It's a reminder of all the friends we lost, not only in combat but ever since then," said resident Jim Law, a 30-year Marine Corps veteran. Bruce Thiesen, deputy secretary of operations for the California Department of Veterans Affairs, will be the featured speaker at the annual event. Mayor Kathleen Blackburn is also scheduled to address the crowd.
NEWS
January 1, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Gov.-elect Gray Davis completed the year Thursday by naming his top tier of advisors on veterans affairs, filling the 11th of 12 cabinet posts in the new administration that takes over Monday. James R. Ramos, 62, a West Point graduate and Vietnam veteran, was named head of the state Department of Veterans Affairs, which governs programs affecting 3.1 million retired servicemen and women, as well as the Cal-Vet loan program and the state's homes for retired veterans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2002 | Carl Ingram, Times Staff Writer
Newly retired Sen. Maurice K. Johannessen, who twice broke with fellow Republicans to cast the deciding vote for Senate approval of Gov. Gray Davis' state budgets, was appointed Tuesday as secretary of the troubled Department of Veterans Affairs. Davis announced the appointment of Johannessen, 68, former chairman of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee, at a ceremony where Johannessen was applauded by veterans in white caps and by department employees.
NEWS
January 17, 1994 | PAUL HOUSTON and THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL
VETS UP IN ARMS: A political fireball as hot as the controversy over homosexuals in the military may be White House-bound. Veterans are furious over reports that the Clinton Administration is moving toward lifting the economic embargo on Vietnam. . . . The American Legion is mobilizing its troops and lining up other groups for a massive telephone and letter-writing protest to President Clinton and members of Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2002 | AMANDA COVARRUBIAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After listening to disgruntled veterans voice their displeasure Monday with plans to build a smaller nursing home in Saticoy than proposed, members of a state board toured the 22-acre site. About 40 local veterans attended a meeting of the Governor's Commission on California Veterans Homes to complain that the state reneged on a promise to build a 400-bed home near the Santa Clara River, reducing it to 100 beds instead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2001 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filling a Cabinet-level position that had been vacant for 18 months, Gov. Gray Davis on Wednesday appointed Bruce Thiesen, temporary secretary of the troubled Department of Veterans Affairs, as permanent secretary. Thiesen has occupied the post on an interim basis since May 2000, when Secretary Tomas Alvarado resigned after the death at the Barstow Veterans Home of a World War II infantry sergeant who choked on his lunch.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1994 | From Associated Press
American companies could share in as much as $9 billion worth of trade and investment if the 19-year economic embargo against Vietnam is lifted, according to the director of a business group. "Americans could participate in $6 billion in trade and $2 billion or $3 billion in investment," Virginia B. Foote said following a U.S. Senate vote Thursday urging the Clinton Administration to lift the embargo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2002 | Carl Ingram, Times Staff Writer
Bruce Thiesen, whose appointment by Gov. Gray Davis as chief of the state Department of Veterans Affairs was rejected by the California Senate, will return to the department as a top executive, administration officials said Thursday. Thiesen, a member of Davis' first-term administration, served as the secretary of veterans affairs without Senate confirmation for a year. He was forced to leave the post, which pays $131,412 a year, Nov. 20. But administration officials confirmed Thursday that Davis, who was angered by the Senate's refusal to approve Thiesen, has now named him to the No. 3 job at the agency.
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