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Brush Fires California

NEWS
September 4, 1987 | JESS BRAVIN, Times Staff Writer
The fires raging across California sparked a squabble at the state Capitol on Thursday as Assembly Democrats battled Republican Gov. George Deukmejian and his allies in the lower house over money the governor cut from a fire prevention bill in July. With a 41-34 vote, the Assembly declined to override a Deukmejian veto of $2 million in fire prevention funds. Two-thirds majorities of both the 80-member Assembly and 40-seat Senate are required to override a gubernatorial veto.
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NEWS
September 1, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
At least two dozen people were injured, five houses and three fire trucks were destroyed and nearly 7,000 acres of timber and brushland were blackened Monday as lightning sparked more than 400 fires, nearly overwhelming firefighting forces throughout California. Maryn Pitt, a California Department of Forestry assistant director, said more than 2,600 lightning strikes in 11 hours Sunday touched off the series of fires that continued to burn Monday, with more lightning and winds expected.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
More than 4,400 firefighters and 186 pieces of equipment have been sent from Southern California this week to help battle the fires that are ravaging the northern two-thirds of the state. The support effort, directed from the California Department of Forestry's regional headquarters in Riverside, has been drawing on resources provided through four major agencies, including the Los Angeles County Fire Department.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harry Rees, a retired plumber from Orange County, fully believes what firefighters know and records confirm: Unlike cousin lightning, wildfire has a nasty habit of striking the same place twice. Thirty years ago, before this Sierra foothill settlement was on most maps, a blaze dubbed the Harlow fire stormed across 20,000 mostly vacant acres in two hours. Today, Rees and 2,000 people live in Harlow's path.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Firefighters preparing for potentially the worst fire season in the state in years said they will gamble on a new aggressive strategy to hit blazes fast and hard. By throwing more resources at wildfires early while they are small, officials acknowledge, the plan could leave some areas of the state with thinner margins of protection than in the past.
NEWS
August 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
Fire crews struggled through blistering weather and tough terrain Monday to gain 75% containment on a wildfire in the central Sierra Nevada that forced the evacuation of about 300 people. The 7,500-acre blaze, triggered Saturday by an unattended campfire, forced the hamlets of Moccasin, Big Oak Flat and Ferndale to evacuate. No homes were burned, and residents of Moccasin were allowed to go home Sunday.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
A wildfire that burned two homes near this Mother Lode town grew quickly to 400 acres Tuesday, causing evacuation of 200 to 300 homes in an area of four square miles. Afternoon temperatures were near 100 degrees, and the fire spread fast and jumped forward--or spotted--with the wind. But about 350 firefighters, eight aerial tankers and a helicopter appeared to be making progress against it as the day ended.
NEWS
August 28, 1999 | From Times staff and wire reports
After nearly a week of battling wildfires across several Northern California counties, firefighters finally began getting the upper hand Friday, aided by the absence of new lightning strikes that had ignited many of the blazes several days ago. "We've made progress," said Jolene DeGroot, spokeswoman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, noting that firefighters were close to containment on the 10 major blazes still burning in Northern California.
NEWS
September 21, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Firefighters set up a wall of fire trucks Tuesday to save about 50 rural homes from a wind-awakened arson blaze that ravaged 20,000 acres of brush and grass northeast of the San Francisco Bay Area. Officials said a ridge and the trucks were expected to prevent damage to the homes evacuated Monday night when the wind kicked up, gusting to 50 m.p.h. About 500 people fled when the flames roared toward the homes in a Vaca Valley rural development about 25 miles northeast of San Francisco Bay.
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