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Bryan Burrough

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BUSINESS
April 28, 1992 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Express Co. Chairman and Chief Executive James D. Robinson III personally approved payments to two company operatives who were deeply involved in the company's smearcampaign against rival banker Edmond Safra, according to a former company executive and a new book by financial writer Bryan Burrough. Harry L. Freeman, a former executive vice president of American Express, said in an interview Monday that Robinson had approved the payments to the two operatives.
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BUSINESS
April 28, 1992 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Express Co. Chairman and Chief Executive James D. Robinson III personally approved payments to two company operatives who were deeply involved in the company's smearcampaign against rival banker Edmond Safra, according to a former company executive and a new book by financial writer Bryan Burrough. Harry L. Freeman, a former executive vice president of American Express, said in an interview Monday that Robinson had approved the payments to the two operatives.
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BOOKS
January 28, 1990 | Scot J. Paltrow, Paltrow is a financial correspondent in the Los Angeles Times' New York bureau.
In late 1988, the corporate takeover frenzy reached its ultimate pinnacle: The $25 billion acquisition of RJR/Nabisco by the celebrated "leveraged buyout" firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. The acquisition followed a protracted, vicious bidding war, and the sheer size of the deal set it apart. The final price was twice as large as anything that had come before. It defied conventional Wall Street wisdom at the time that mega-companies the size of RJR were immune from such ownership battles.
BOOKS
January 28, 1990 | Scot J. Paltrow, Paltrow is a financial correspondent in the Los Angeles Times' New York bureau.
In late 1988, the corporate takeover frenzy reached its ultimate pinnacle: The $25 billion acquisition of RJR/Nabisco by the celebrated "leveraged buyout" firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. The acquisition followed a protracted, vicious bidding war, and the sheer size of the deal set it apart. The final price was twice as large as anything that had come before. It defied conventional Wall Street wisdom at the time that mega-companies the size of RJR were immune from such ownership battles.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | Howard Rosenberg
Can stratospheric high finance, which appears so tedious and complicated on paper, really be this much of a hoot? You can't imagine a more deliciously entertaining movie about the $25-billion leveraged buyout of R.J.R. Nabisco Co. The script by Larry Gelbart, based on a bestseller by Bryan Burrough and John Helyar, demonstrates that the former "MASH" head writer is as acutely clever and witty as ever. Former Nabisco president F.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Stark to Make Nabisco Story: Backed by Columbia Pictures, producer Ray Stark ("Steel Magnolias") has landed film rights to the nonfiction best seller, "Barbarians at the Gate: The Fall of RJR Nabisco," written by Wall Street Journal reporters Bryan Burrough and John Helyar, who covered the breaking story of the 1988 $25-billion leveraged buy-out of the company.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2009
Kudos to Bryan Burrough for an excellent essay reviewing the cinematic portrayals of gangsters, particularly John Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson ["A Straight-Shooting Flick," June 28]. I was surprised, however, that he missed a key movie: Mickey Rooney's tough-guy portrayal in "Baby Face Nelson" (1957). Leo Gordon played John Dillinger, in a minor role. Rooney's character would bark at his wife, "Sue, hand me the chopper!" (machine gun). Strangely, Nelson's wife was named Helen. Rooney, in his 30s, was about 10 years older than Nelson was during his crime spree.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1994
Times staff writers Scot J. Paltrow and Kathryn Harris on Monday were named winners of the 1994 Gerald Loeb Awards for business and financial journalism. Paltrow was cited for an investigative series on Prudential Securities Inc. and Harris for her coverage of the Paramount Communications Inc. takeover battle. The awards, established in 1957 by the late Gerald Loeb and administered by UCLA's John E.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Johnny Depp will launch a publishing imprint with Harper, a division of HarperCollins, called Infinitum Nihil. That's the same as his production company, which has had a hand in the films "The Rum Diary" (adapted from the novel by Hunter S. Thompson), "Hugo" (adapted from the children's book by Brian Selznick), and "Dark Shadows" and "The Lone Ranger," both film remakes of old television shows. Since graduating from "21 Jump Street," Depp has chosen roles that are a mixture of pop culture and literary adaptations.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2002 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Hollywood, it's the Gary Condit story of the early summer, L.A.'s answer to New York's fascination with the beleaguered Martha Stewart. "It certainly has struck a chord," notes producer Tom Pollock, former chairman of Universal Pictures. "When I wanted to talk to people about Vivendi Universal or Time Warner--which is really important stuff--all anybody wants to talk about is Mike Ovitz and the gay mafia."
BUSINESS
May 11, 1992 | JAMES BATES
Nothing like the worst riot in U.S. history to turn long-planned promotional campaigns into ill-timed ones. At Disneyland the slogan, "Be There When the Night Ignites," was abruptly dropped for its new "Fantasmic" special effects show. (Rival Universal Studios not long ago had a "The Riot Act" stunt show, but the name was dropped last summer.
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