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BUSINESS
July 2, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Former KPMG auditing partner Scott London pleaded guilty to an insider-trading charge, and struggled afterward to explain why he jeopardized his career, reputation and freedom for money he didn't need. London, 50, admitted in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles on Monday that he had disclosed privileged information about KPMG's clients to a friend, knowing the tips would be used to trade stocks. District Judge George H. Wu ordered London to return Oct. 21 for sentencing. The conviction carries a maximum term of 20 years in prison.
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BUSINESS
July 2, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Former KPMG auditing partner Scott London pleaded guilty to an insider-trading charge, and struggled afterward to explain why he jeopardized his career, reputation and freedom for money he didn't need. London, 50, admitted in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles on Monday that he had disclosed privileged information about KPMG's clients to a friend, knowing the tips would be used to trade stocks. District Judge George H. Wu ordered London to return Oct. 21 for sentencing. The conviction carries a maximum term of 20 years in prison.
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BUSINESS
July 1, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Moments after pleading guilty to an insider-trading charge, former KPMG partner Scott London struggled to explain the conduct that ruined his career and is very likely to send him to federal prison. “It was probably the worst day of my life,” London said in an interview in the hallway outside the courtroom of U.S. District Judge George H. Wu, who is scheduled to sentence London on Oct. 21. “Imagine what you do, you do it for 30 years, you go to school for it and in a matter of weeks it's all gone,” London said.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Moments after pleading guilty to an insider-trading charge, former KPMG partner Scott London struggled to explain the conduct that ruined his career and is very likely to send him to federal prison. “It was probably the worst day of my life,” London said in an interview in the hallway outside the courtroom of U.S. District Judge George H. Wu, who is scheduled to sentence London on Oct. 21. “Imagine what you do, you do it for 30 years, you go to school for it and in a matter of weeks it's all gone,” London said.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer and Adolfo Flores
A San Fernando Valley jeweler pleaded guilty Monday to a conspiracy charge in an insider-trading case and agreed to turn over $1.27 million in stock-trading gains made from tips allegedly provided by a then partner at accounting giant KPMG. Bryan Shaw, 52, of Lake Sherwood admitted to conspiring with KPMG auditor Scott London to trade in the stocks of the accounting firm's clients. The pair was longtime friends who enjoyed golfing together. With a swift "Guilty, your honor," Shaw entered his plea before U.S. District Court Judge George H. Wu in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2000 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a cornetist, 46-year-old Costa Mesa resident Bryan Shaw has played all kinds of music, from symphonic pieces to rock, from light opera to gospel. As a recording engineer, he has mastered more than 1,000 recordings representing all genres. Ask Shaw which music he enjoys hearing and playing most, and he'll send you back 70 and 80 years to Louis Armstrong and the early days of jazz.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
The arraignment for Scott London, the former KPMG auditor accused of participating in an insider trading scheme that netted over $1 million, was postponed Monday to an unknown date. It was pushed back because federal prosecutors expect to move the matter before a different judge -- U.S. District Court Judge George H. Wu, who is overseeing the case for Bryan Shaw, the other defendant involved in the alleged crime. The U.S. Department of Justice charged London with one count of conspiracy to commit securities fraud through insider trading.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton, Andrea Chang and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
It's the kind of audacious but small-stakes insider trading that normally wouldn't have merited much attention. Golfing buddies Scott London and Bryan Shaw netted just $1.3 million, a blip in a world where Wall Street kingpins pocket hundreds of millions in ill-gotten gains. The two men made one misstep after another. Their haplessness virtually guaranteed they'd get nailed, experts said. The scope of their ill-fated caper was made clear Thursday when federal prosecutors in Los Angeles filed a criminal charge against London, alleging that he passed insider tips to Shaw from 2010 to 2013.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Former KPMG partner Scott London should be sentenced to three years in prison for selling secret information about the accounting firm's clients to a stock-trading friend, who used the tips to make more than $1.2 million in profitable trades, the federal probation office has recommended. London, who supervised a team of auditors at KPMG's Los Angeles office, was charged with insider trading in April after FBI agents secretly photographed him accepting cash from his friend, Encino jeweler Bryan Shaw, as payment for past tips about the accounting firm's clients.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Former KPMG auditing partner Scott London should spend three years in prison on his insider-trading conviction for selling secret information about the accounting firm's clients to a stock-trading friend, the federal probation office in Los Angeles recommended. The tips to Encino jeweler Bryan Shaw resulted in nearly $1.3 million in profitable trades, prosecutors alleged. The probation office, in a confidential report, recommended the prison term, and the information was disclosed in court papers filed recently by London's attorney, Harland Braun.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
The arraignment for Scott London, the former KPMG auditor accused of participating in an insider trading scheme that netted over $1 million, was postponed Monday to an unknown date. It was pushed back because federal prosecutors expect to move the matter before a different judge -- U.S. District Court Judge George H. Wu, who is overseeing the case for Bryan Shaw, the other defendant involved in the alleged crime. The U.S. Department of Justice charged London with one count of conspiracy to commit securities fraud through insider trading.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2013 | Los Angeles Times
A San Fernando Valley jeweler at the center of an insider-trading scandal pleaded guilty to a conspiracy charge and agreed to turn over $1.27 million in ill-gotten stock gains made from tips from a top auditor at accounting giant KPMG. Bryan Shaw, 52, of Lake Sherwood admitted Monday to conspiring with KPMG auditor Scott London to trade in the stocks of the accounting firm's clients. The pair, who became friends after meeting on a golf course, plotted to profit from the market in what federal prosecutors described as a "severe breach of trust.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton, Andrea Chang and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
It's the kind of audacious but small-stakes insider trading that normally wouldn't have merited much attention. Golfing buddies Scott London and Bryan Shaw netted just $1.3 million, a blip in a world where Wall Street kingpins pocket hundreds of millions in ill-gotten gains. The two men made one misstep after another. Their haplessness virtually guaranteed they'd get nailed, experts said. The scope of their ill-fated caper was made clear Thursday when federal prosecutors in Los Angeles filed a criminal charge against London, alleging that he passed insider tips to Shaw from 2010 to 2013.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2000 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As a cornetist, 46-year-old Costa Mesa resident Bryan Shaw has played all kinds of music, from symphonic pieces to rock, from light opera to gospel. As a recording engineer, he has mastered more than 1,000 recordings representing all genres. Ask Shaw which music he enjoys hearing and playing most, and he'll send you back 70 and 80 years to Louis Armstrong and the early days of jazz.
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