Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBryan Stow
IN THE NEWS

Bryan Stow

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2012 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
The video shows Marvin Norwood sitting in an interrogation room, speaking to his mother on an LAPD detective's cellphone. "Hey, I got arrested for that Dodger Stadium thing," the 31-year-old says. "I was involved.... To a certain extent I was. " He tells his mother he can't say much over the phone but says Louie Sanchez, 30, is also in custody. Norwood then apologizes: "Pretty sure I'm going down for it.... I'm sorry. " The video was the first piece of evidence Los Angeles County prosecutors put forth Wednesday during the opening day of the preliminary hearing for Norwood and Sanchez.
Advertisement
SPORTS
October 25, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
Bryan Stow is in a rehabilitation facility in the San Francisco Bay Area, seven months removed from the Dodger Stadium parking lot beating that nearly cost him his life. However, amid the legal and financial fine points of the Dodgers bankruptcy, Stow could emerge as a pivotal figure in the case at a crucial hearing next week. Stow won't be there, but with his representatives sitting on the official committee of creditors, attorneys for the Dodgers and Major League Baseball are expected to refer to Stow in their arguments in a Delaware courtroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2011 | By Richard Winton, Jack Leonard and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
The trouble began sometime after the first pitch at the Dodgers' opening day game against the San Francisco Giants. Dodgers fans Louie Sanchez, 29, and Marvin Norwood, 30 — friends and neighbors from Rialto — yelled taunts at Giants fans and threw soda at them, according to several law enforcement sources. They were so unruly that people sitting nearby in the stands behind third base later reported the pair to police. As the game wound down, the men allegedly grew more hostile.
SPORTS
February 22, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
The Dodgers should not be allowed to use the U.S. Bankruptcy Court to minimize their liability to Bryan Stow, attorneys for the injured San Francisco Giants fan argued Wednesday. The Dodgers, saying they should not be held liable for an attack they could not have predicted, have asked the Bankruptcy Court to throw out Stow's claim. Wednesday, Stow's attorneys asked the Bankruptcy Court to yield to Los Angeles Superior Court, where they filed a civil suit last May against team owner Frank McCourt, the Dodgers and related entities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2012 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Bryan Stow, the Bay Area paramedic severely beaten at Dodger Stadium, was attacked after he used medical slang to express disgust with local fans taunting his group of San Francisco Giants supporters, according to testimony Wednesday. A friend and fellow paramedic quoted Stow as saying "I hope they code" - shorthand for suffering cardiac arrest - of Dodger fans profanely jeering him and three friends as they left the Opening Day game last year. "His voice was raised, but he wasn't looking at anyone or directing it at anyone," recalled witness Corey Maciel.
SPORTS
September 22, 2011 | Bill Plaschke
Tommy Lasorda was holding court in the dugout. Nancy Bea Hefley was waxing melodic by the camera well. Don Mattingly was talking ball by the batting cage. But before the final major league baseball game at Dodger Stadium this season, only one voice mattered. "Did you hear?" somebody said. "Bryan Stow talked. " And so, one of the most awful summers in the history of Chavez Ravine ended Thursday with the empty seats and broken promises dusted in hope. Stow, the Santa Clara paramedic who was beaten into a coma in the parking lot here after an opening day victory over the San Francisco Giants, spoke this week for the first time since then.
OPINION
November 2, 2011
The right to vote Re "GOP tightens election laws in key states," Oct. 31 In many countries, voting is mandatory; it is considered an obligation. Here in America, on the other hand, election day turnout is embarrassingly low, especially at the local level. Yet we have Republican lawmakers in several states going all out to reduce the numbers of eligible voters because voting should not be convenient or easy; after all, it is "a hard-fought privilege" that people died for, according to Florida GOP Sen. Michael Bennett.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2012 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Two men charged in state court in connection with the brutal beating of San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow will each face federal charges of being a felon in possession of a firearm, authorities said Tuesday. Marvin Norwood and Louie Sanchez were arrested last year and charged with felony assault and mayhem in the attack on Stow in one of the parking lots at Dodger Stadium on March 31, 2011. The U.S. attorney's office added the weapons charges in a 14-page indictment. If convicted of the charge of being a felon in possession of a firearm, each man faces up to 10 years in federal prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2012 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
The sound of bone against concrete was as sickening as it was loud, reverberating across a parking lot at Dodger Stadium and alerting fans streaming to their cars that something had gone horribly wrong on opening day. In a Los Angeles courtroom Thursday, two witnesses to the brutal assault on Bryan Stow last year recalled the sound of his skull striking the ground as a particularly chilling moment in a terrifying episode. "It was a really loud, almost echo-ish," witness Joann Cerda recalled, adding the she was certain Stow was dead.
OPINION
November 1, 2011
Another controversy around beleaguered Dodgers owner Frank McCourt erupted last week when an attorney defending him against a lawsuit brought by the family of Bryan Stow raised the possibility that Stow might be held partly responsible for the beating that left him brain damaged. "In 23 years, I have yet to see anything at Dodger Stadium involving any form of altercation that didn't involve at least two willing combatants," Jerome Jackson, the attorney, said on an ESPN radio talk show.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|