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BUSINESS
December 7, 2006 | From Reuters
British satellite broadcaster BSkyB said it would team up with Mountain View, Calif.-based Google Inc. to deploy the Internet company's suite of search, advertising and video functions on its broadband service. BSkyB Chief Executive James Murdoch said the broadcaster would launch an online user-generated video-sharing site, its own e-mail service and a search portal. Revenue generated by click-throughs on sponsored advertising links would be shared between the two companies.
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BUSINESS
February 28, 2006 | From Reuters
Walt Disney Co. reached an agreement to increase the amount of programming it supplies to Britain's BSkyB pay-TV service, adding a new channel featuring animated films and another with historic sporting events. Financial terms and the duration of the contract were not disclosed. A British newspaper put the value of the deal at 130 million pounds ($226 million) a year. The transaction gives BSkyB, which is facing tough competition, additional fare with which to lure new customers.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
British Sky Broadcasting Group, the British pay-TV operator controlled by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp., reported a 49% drop in quarterly profit and warned that future earnings would be hurt by an $819-million investment program designed to increase long-term growth. The news sent the company's shares tumbling. BSkyB's U.S.-traded shares dropped $7.75, or 17%, to $36.85 on the NYSE. The investment is part of a new long-term growth plan.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2003 | From Reuters and Bloomberg News
James Murdoch weathered a storm of intense criticism at his debut British Sky Broadcasting Group shareholder meeting, as Chairman Rupert Murdoch fiercely defended his son's appointment as chief executive. "There is no conflict of interest," the elder Murdoch said. There were bitter words from the audience. "You have an arrogance to shareholders that is appalling," one investor said. Despite the furor, James Murdoch was confirmed as a board member.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2003 | Sallie Hofmeister, Times Staff Writer
The appointment Monday of media mogul Rupert Murdoch's youngest son to run Europe's largest satellite television broadcaster got the cold shoulder from some of News Corp.'s most influential investors. Critics, including the National Assn. of Pension Funds and the Assn. of British Insurers, said they saw nepotism behind the ascension of 30-year-old James Murdoch to chief executive of one of the company's prized operations, British Sky Broadcasting.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2003 | Sallie Hofmeister, Times Staff Writer
In an ascension that could spark a heated rivalry for the News Corp. throne, Rupert Murdoch's younger son, James, is poised to take the helm of British Sky Broadcasting, Britain's dominant pay TV provider and a jewel in the family's media conglomerate. News Corp. declined to comment on potential management changes at BSkyB. But sources close to the situation said Wednesday that the BSkyB board could vote within two weeks to make the 30-year-old its next chief executive.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2002 | Reuters
Vivendi Universal sold its remaining stake of 14% in British Sky Broadcasting Group in a deal worth $2.5billion. A source close to the sale said that the deal to sell the stake in BSkyB was designed to alleviate the pressure on Vivendi credit rating. "It's clear Vivendi has chosen now to sell the stake because they received a credit downgrade recently," the source said.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2002 | Associated Press
Rupert Murdoch's BSkyB satellite broadcaster said it will force Germany's collapsing Kirch media conglomerate to repay $1.5 billion, money the Munich-based company probably doesn't have. BSkyB said in a statement it was exercising an option granted when it bought a 22% stake in KirchPayTV, the failed pay television wing of Kirch Group, Germany's largest private broadcaster.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2002 | Associated Press
Debt-laden German media giant Kirch Group faced more pressure after Rupert Murdoch's BSkyB said it wanted to sell its stake in the company's money-losing pay-TV operation back to Kirch. British satellite broadcaster BSkyB said it didn't know whether Kirch had the money to pay. BSkyB announced a big fiscal first-half loss after writing off the value of its investment in the Kirch unit. Munich-based Kirch has run up debts of about $4.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2001 | Bloomberg News
British Sky Broadcasting Group's fiscal fourth-quarter loss widened as Europe's second-biggest pay-television company spent more on films, sports and services to draw viewers. The London-based company's loss for the quarter ended June 30 was $244 million from a loss of $180.9 million a year earlier, the company said. BSkyB added about 150,000 subscribers in the period.
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