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Buck Clayton

ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
The world of jazz on land today is sadly circumscribed. There is no longer a 52nd Street where clubs were nestled so close together that the musicians could sit in with each other's bands between sets. Concerts are even more firmly structured; after two hourlong sets, it's all over at 11 p.m. For this reason, among others, the floating jazz festival has certain advantages over any other form of presentation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
Napoleon declared that history is a fable agreed upon. Henry Ford said history is bunk. The world of jazz, no more or less than other areas in the documentation of the arts, has been subjected to certain persistent myths, agreed upon in some instances or argued about in others. In any event, it seems appropriate to deal with several of the more widely circulated misapprehensions, some of them due to critical errors, others corrected by the critics but still misunderstood by the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The recent sixth annual Jazz Times Magazine Convention was akin to a physical checkup--except that each of the 600 registered participants was at once a doctor and a patient. By the end of the convention, they had learned a great deal about one another's economic and artistic health. The theme this year, detailed in an opening session by Jazz Times publisher Ira Sabin, was "Jazz and the Media: Past, Present and Future."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What if they gave an all-star jazz party and no trumpeters came? More than any other instrument, the horn would be conspicuous by its absence. From the beginning of time--jazz time, that is--the trumpet or cornet has been central to the music. Trumpeters functioned as actual or de facto leaders of the most influential groups. Legend tells us the first jazz soloist was Buddy Bolden, 1877-1931, a New Orleans cornetist whose band played the honky-tonks of Storyville a century ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
We music lovers live in exciting times. The establishment of the compact disc has been more than a technological revolution. From the standpoint of many jazz students it has become an incentive to start a serious, comprehensive library. It's sad to reflect that most of today's jazz fans are too young ever to have heard in person the majority of giants created by this art form.
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