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Buddha

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2010
'The Buddha' Where: KCET When: 8 p.m. Wednesday Rating: TV-G (suitable for all ages)
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SCIENCE
November 25, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Ancient bricks, tile roofing and wood charcoal discovered beneath a Nepalese pilgrimage site are providing new evidence for the time of Buddha's birth, according to archaeologists. In research published Monday in the journal Antiquity, scholars wrote that the evidence supports a 6th century BC nativity for the Buddha. A precise date of birth remains unknown. Historians have wavered over dates ranging between 623 BC and 340 BC. Much of the confusion has to do with the lack of a written record.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2010 | By ROBERT LLOYD, Television Critic
You may think you know the Buddha, because you have seen him standing outside a Chinese restaurant, belly burnished from being rubbed repeatedly for good luck, or hiding in the corner of a garden. But you have more to learn, grasshopper. David Grubin's "The Buddha," which airs Wednesday on PBS, is not the story of Buddhism -- whose history as a religion, like that of Christianity, really gets going after the demise of its founder and is addressed here only in a couple of lines near the end of the film -- but rather that of the historical person who said the things on which followers have based their several, differing practices.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2013 | By David Pierson
Walk past the signs for Krispy Kreme sloppy joes. Head toward the massive servings of curly fries. Turn left at the stall for chocolate-covered bacon. Out on the edge of the L.A. County fairgrounds in Pomona is a 1-acre space packed with Mother Nature's answer to extreme food. There you might find the Australian finger lime, a pickle-shaped green citrus whose pulp looks like golden caviar. Nearby is the Buddha's hand plant, whose tentacled fruit dangles from its spiny branches like a canary-colored octopus.
TRAVEL
March 6, 2011 | By Karin Esterhammer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As I sat on a high ledge of the 734-year-old Mingalarzedi Temple, looking out over the hundreds of ancient temples around Bagan, I wondered how long it would take a visitor to see them all. Archaeologists say there once were about 5,000 temples, but earthquakes, decay and long-ago looters have destroyed more than half of them. Still, that's a lot of temples to explore in this 16-square-mile archaeological treasure trove. We visited Myanmar in February 2010 and, yes, I did feel a twinge of guilt when booking the trip.
SCIENCE
November 25, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Ancient bricks, tile roofing and wood charcoal discovered beneath a Nepalese pilgrimage site are providing new evidence for the time of Buddha's birth, according to archaeologists. In research published Monday in the journal Antiquity, scholars wrote that the evidence supports a 6th century BC nativity for the Buddha. A precise date of birth remains unknown. Historians have wavered over dates ranging between 623 BC and 340 BC. Much of the confusion has to do with the lack of a written record.
NEWS
December 26, 1985
With all this hullabaloo in Downey over the Nativity scene site and the creche crusade, I offer the following: If the residents of Downey are so enlightened to sponsor a Christian theme in a democracy, then would they be so gracious if a group of Buddhists tried to erect a statue of Buddha outdoors in the month of May with a sign that read, "Happy Birthday, Buddha"? Downey would probably be up in arms. --GERALD P. LUNDERVILLE Downey
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A newly discovered wood sculpture of a Buddha has sold for $14.3 million, a price the auctioneer calls a world record for any Japanese work of art. Christie's said the seated figure of Dainichi Nyorai, or the supreme Buddha, is attributed to 13th century sculptor Unkei. The work was sold in New York on Tuesday to Mitsukoshi Ltd., one of Japan's major department stores. Christie's said the previous record for a Japanese work of art was $1.76 million for a Rakuchu Rakugai screen, which it sold in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Eddie Pepitone, perhaps the funniest stand-up comedian you've never heard of, gets a deserving close-up in the amusing, freewheeling documentary "The Bitter Buddha. " Although the dyspeptic Pepitone, an unmade bed of a guy in his early 50s, has reportedly been at his craft for 30 years, he's yet to turn into the household name that such not-dissimilar comics as George Carlin, Rodney Dangerfield and Sam Kinison became. Still, the native New Yorker, now living a busy if largely unglamorous life in L.A., consistently plies his trade in comedy clubs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1986
Many Los Angeles area Buddhists gathered in and around a temple in the Wilshire District on Sunday to celebrate the 2,530th anniversary of the birth of the man for whom their religion was founded. In the courtyard of the temple, once a three-story apartment building, a saffron-robed monk recited Buddhist scripture at an altar bedecked with flowers, fruit and candlesticks around a picture of the infant Buddha, standing over an open lotus flower.
HEALTH
March 30, 2013
The vocabulary of meditation can be a barrier for people who feel that they're entering a strange world, experts say. Here are some common words. Buddha : meaning one who is awake, in Sanskrit. The Buddha was a person, not a god, who lived more than 2,000 years ago; from a privileged family, he became a seeker of truth and eventually became enlightened. Dharma : often used to mean the teachings of Buddhism and meditation. Mantra : a word -- "om" being perhaps the most famous -- repeated as a way to keep the mind focused on one spot during meditation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Eddie Pepitone, perhaps the funniest stand-up comedian you've never heard of, gets a deserving close-up in the amusing, freewheeling documentary "The Bitter Buddha. " Although the dyspeptic Pepitone, an unmade bed of a guy in his early 50s, has reportedly been at his craft for 30 years, he's yet to turn into the household name that such not-dissimilar comics as George Carlin, Rodney Dangerfield and Sam Kinison became. Still, the native New Yorker, now living a busy if largely unglamorous life in L.A., consistently plies his trade in comedy clubs.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Hong Kong, Macau and Bangkok are linked in a 10-day trip from Gate1 Travel that allows time to explore each city without being on a formal tour schedule. The trip begins in Hong Kong, where participants have three days to shop or visit landmarks -- like Victoria Peak to catch views of the city and the bay. From there, it's a ferry ride to Macau, the Asian Las Vegas, which has pretty beaches and parks in addition to the flashy array of casino resorts and nightlife.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012
'An Evening with the Bitter Buddha' Where: The Echoplex, 1154 Glendale Blvd When: 8 p.m. Tue. Price: $15 in advance, $17 day of show, $18 at door Info: (213) 413-8200; http://www.attheecho.com
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
He's been called "the Charles Bukowski of comedy," as well as a pot-bellied "bitter Buddha" at the epicenter of the alternative comedy world. Cult comic Eddie Pepitone has been performing his spontaneous, rant-heavy brand of humor onstage for more than 30 years, including regular appearances on "Conan" and "The Sarah Silverman Program. " Over the decades, the "comic's comic," as he's often called, has inspired the likes of Zach Galifianakis, Patton Oswalt, Marc Maron and Silverman — as well as a generation of newcomers through his Twitter feed ( @eddiepepitone )
TRAVEL
January 6, 2012 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Four a.m. is a terrible time of day, too late for night owls, too early for early risers. The exception is 4 a.m. at Borobudur, waiting for the sun to rise over the Kedu Plain in central Java with 504 figures of Buddha. The temple is one of three great religious sites in Southeast Asia, but it's older and more esoteric than Bagan in Myanmar and Angkor Wat in Cambodia. It was begun in the 8th century by the Sailendras, a dynasty of Buddhist kings who ruled central Java for almost 200 years until their power waned and the temple was abandoned.
SPORTS
May 4, 2002 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The atmosphere in trainer James Bond's 007 Stable at Churchill Downs couldn't have been grimmer had Dr. No, Odd Job and Auric Goldfinger shown up at the same time. It was early Friday morning, a couple of hours after Bond, of the same name as author Ian Fleming's spy extraordinaire, had found Buddha lame in his stall. The Wood Memorial winner, and at 5-1 the co-second choice with Came Home on the morning line, was immediately scratched from today's running of the 128th Kentucky Derby.
HEALTH
March 30, 2013
The vocabulary of meditation can be a barrier for people who feel that they're entering a strange world, experts say. Here are some common words. Buddha : meaning one who is awake, in Sanskrit. The Buddha was a person, not a god, who lived more than 2,000 years ago; from a privileged family, he became a seeker of truth and eventually became enlightened. Dharma : often used to mean the teachings of Buddhism and meditation. Mantra : a word -- "om" being perhaps the most famous -- repeated as a way to keep the mind focused on one spot during meditation.
WORLD
September 26, 2011 | By Rajneesh Bhandari and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Two Americans were among 19 people killed Sunday in Nepal when a small plane carrying tourists to view Mt. Everest crashed as it tried to land in rain and dense fog, police said. The crash of the Beechcraft 1900D aircraft operated by Buddha Air went down in Kotdanda, about 10 miles from the capital, Katmandu, killing everyone aboard just minutes before its scheduled return to Tribhuvan International Airport. The $140 Buddha Air "Everest Experience" package flies tourists from Katmandu around the world's tallest mountain and back.
TRAVEL
March 6, 2011 | By Karin Esterhammer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As I sat on a high ledge of the 734-year-old Mingalarzedi Temple, looking out over the hundreds of ancient temples around Bagan, I wondered how long it would take a visitor to see them all. Archaeologists say there once were about 5,000 temples, but earthquakes, decay and long-ago looters have destroyed more than half of them. Still, that's a lot of temples to explore in this 16-square-mile archaeological treasure trove. We visited Myanmar in February 2010 and, yes, I did feel a twinge of guilt when booking the trip.
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