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December 16, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the foothills of Mt. Fuji, just lightly dusted with snow this time of year, are the sprawling grounds of Taisekiji, the ancient temple headquarters of the Buddhist order of Nichiren Shoshu. It's a startling sight. Attached like a misplaced appendage to the 700-year-old temple compound of prayer halls, pagoda and inner gardens is a stadium-sized, white granite structure shaped like a slice of melon.
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NEWS
December 16, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the foothills of Mt. Fuji, just lightly dusted with snow this time of year, are the sprawling grounds of Taisekiji, the ancient temple headquarters of the Buddhist order of Nichiren Shoshu. It's a startling sight. Attached like a misplaced appendage to the 700-year-old temple compound of prayer halls, pagoda and inner gardens is a stadium-sized, white granite structure shaped like a slice of melon.
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NEWS
December 16, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conflict between Japan's largest Buddhist sect and its powerful lay organization has reverberated through the Southern California-based U.S. wing of the Soka Gakkai, according to former and current members of the group. Earlier this year, when the split became evident, the U.S.
NEWS
December 16, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conflict between Japan's largest Buddhist sect and its powerful lay organization has reverberated through the Southern California-based U.S. wing of the Soka Gakkai, according to former and current members of the group. Earlier this year, when the split became evident, the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1989 | LAURIE OCHOA
Poets, as few others, must live close to the world that primitive men are in: the world in its nakedness, which is fundamental for all of us--birth, love, death, the sheer fact of being alive. --Gary Snyder Gary Snyder is tolerant of many things--but cities are not one of them. "I think New York should be leveled and made into a buffalo pasture," he once told the Village Voice. This week, however, the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet will make his way down from his remote home in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada to the outer limits of Los Angeles (Langley Hall at CalArts in Valencia)
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | MARCOS CALO MEDINA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
George Pan grabs a heavy meat cleaver from the rack, sharpens it on a whetstone block and rubs iodine over the blade while an ailing patient waits to begin his unique therapy. Pan taps the patient's body with the sharp--not flat--side of a 10-inch blade, saying his "knife massage" releases the body's stored energy, increases blood flow and washes away harmful toxins.
NEWS
May 16, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Imperial Household Agency confirmed Tuesday that Crown Princess Masako is pregnant with a long-awaited heir to the 2,600-year-old Chrysanthemum Throne. No announcement has yet been made on the sex of the child. But recent calls by the prime minister for legal changes allowing women to ascend the throne have fueled speculation that the child will be a girl. Women's groups and social critics say having an empress could help improve women's profile--and give Japan a better monarch.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | DEAN TAKEHARA
A visitor immediately notices the fragrance of incense when entering the Higashi Honganji Buddhist Temple in Little Tokyo. The sweet odor, say Buddhists, is similar to the goodwill a selfless individual diffuses on humanity. Incense is also burned by Buddhists in remembrance of the deceased. And much incense will be burned Sunday during special ceremonies as Southland Buddhists meet at their temples to celebrate Buddha's birthday.
MAGAZINE
July 27, 2003 | ANN HEROLD
With his reverence for Buddhism and the pre-Socratics, Robert Dickman might seem unlikely to spend much time chatting with high-level corporate executives, especially at a time when Enron and other scandals have public confidence in corporate integrity at a new low. But the 56-year-old Santa Monica resident looks to the multinationals to make the world a better place. Dickman's firm, FirstVoice Communications, has consulted at Ford Motor Co.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Standing in the shadow of Independence Hall, former California Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr. formally launched his candidacy for the presidency Monday by dedicating himself to throwing off the yoke of the political Establishment. Though he is seeking the presidential nomination of the Democratic Party for the third time, the 53-year-old Brown strenuously lambasted his own party as well as the Republicans as joining in an "unholy alliance" with the entrenched interests that finance campaigns.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Brown is living proof of reincarnation. This time, the onetime seminary student, California governor and perennial candidate has been reborn as a radio talk show host. For the brilliant, if distant, philosopher-politician, it is the perfect job. All he has to do is talk and, once in a while, give out a toll-free number. Bearing his message that special-interest money is corrupting American politics, Brown began his nationally syndicated talk show this week.
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