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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1997
As a Catholic who grew up in West Belfast, Northern Ireland, I witnessed and experienced a lot of sectarian bigotry and religious persecution. I have been living in the United States for more than 10 years, six of them in Yorba Linda. I believed that I could live and raise children here without the influence of bigots affecting our daily lives. Now I am not so sure. The thinly disguised exhibition of sectarianism which took place at the Yorba Linda City Council meeting on March 4 makes me ashamed that I am a resident of that city.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By David Pagel
At a time when museums seem to be torn between blockbusters and specialized scholarship, it's refreshing to come across "In the Land of Snow: Buddhist Art of the Himalayas" at the Norton Simon Museum, a no-nonsense exhibition that spares the bells and whistles to make a strong case for the virtues of amateurism. Not that long ago, before America was a nation of over-professionalized experts, pretension was something to be made fun of and it was OK to be an amateur. The word's Latin root is "lover.
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NEWS
March 29, 1986 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Lofty dialogues between scholars of various world religions might make greater progress if the premise of liberation theology were adopted, according to a notion gaining favor among academicians probing the interfaith frontiers. The idea is that rather than searching for a common religious core, which some think is nonexistent, the discussions should begin with the plight of the poor and examine how each religion addresses those problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
MARCH 28-AUG. 25 'In the Land of Snow: Buddhist Art of the Himalayas' Pasadena's Norton Simon Museum is well-known for having the most impressive collection of European Old Master and early Modern paintings in Los Angeles. Less familiar is the museum's exceptional Indian, Nepalese and Tibetan art. This show will chronicle the movement of Buddhism from India to the Himalayas more than a thousand years ago, bringing numerous important loans together with superlative examples of painting, sculpture, ritual and decorative arts from the Simon's own collection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2009 | Duke Helfand
Deep in a remote desert valley, where rattlesnakes lurk in the scrub, Stéphane Dreyfus and several dozen other Buddhists are preparing to undergo a mind-altering journey: Three years, three months, three weeks and three days of silence. There will be no word from the outside world in the Great Retreat, only the deafening quiet of rock and cactus, with seemingly endless time to ponder the emptiness of life. Dreyfus and his fellow adherents hope to find enlightenment in the silence, a gift they plan to share when they emerge from their long seclusion.
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | From Reuters
Tamil guerrillas killed nine security men in two land mine explosions Thursday, the latest rebel attacks during a Muslim holy week, the Sri Lankan government said. It said the security men--five in one vehicle and four in another--died in the eastern district of Trincomalee. The attacks occurred as thousands of Buddhists marked Wesak, a festival commemorating the birth, enlightenment and death of the Buddha. More than 70% of Sri Lanka's 16 million people are Buddhists.
WORLD
May 28, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - A watchdog group Tuesday called on Myanmar's government to immediately revoke a population-control policy that blocks members of the minority Rohingya Muslim community from having more than two children, saying the newly revived measure is discriminatory, violates human rights and endangers women's health. The Rohingya, who account for about 1 million of Myanmar's 60 million people, are deeply unpopular among the Buddhist majority, who do not consider them citizens even though many Rohingya families have lived in the country for generations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1999 | CHRISTINE CASTRO
The Vietnam Buddhist Temple in Garden Grove will hold a commemoration rite honoring Bodhisatta Quang Duc and other Vietnamese Buddhist devotees who have dedicated their lives to the cause of freedom. Duc burned himself to death in 1963 to escape the oppression of Buddhists by then-South Vietnam President Ngo Dinh Diem, temple officials say. The ceremony will be at 11 a.m. Sunday at the temple, 12292 Magnolia St. Information: (714) 534-7263.
NEWS
October 31, 1996
Re "A Publishing Flood of Biblical Proportions" (Oct. 16): In this article on books about the Bible, Mary Rourke writes that the first book of the Bible is "long since established as humanity's position paper." I'm sure this will surprise the majority of people on the Earth, consisting of Hindus, Buddhists, agnostics, atheists and others who are not believers in Genesis. DONALD MICHAEL KRAIG Los Angeles
WORLD
November 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Thousands of devout Buddhists poured into a remote mountain town in India's northeast, arriving in packed trucks or on foot after trekking for miles along narrow paths for a rare chance to get a glimpse of the Dalai Lama. The Tibetan spiritual leader's weeklong visit to Tawang, in Arunachal Pradesh state near the Chinese border, has been mired in a diplomatic squabble, highlighting the growing friction between Beijing and New Delhi as the two nuclear-armed giants vie for economic and political power.
OPINION
March 9, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Myanmar, the country formerly known as Burma, has made substantial progress in the last few years, moving from military rule toward democracy, releasing political prisoners and freeing from house arrest Nobel Prize-winning democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi. However, the government has relentlessly continued its appalling treatment of the Rohingya population that lives in Rakhine state in western Myanmar. A Muslim minority in an overwhelmingly Buddhist country, the Rohingya are effectively denied citizenship unless they can meet onerous requirements, such as tracing their lineage back decades.
NATIONAL
January 23, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
A jury in Phoenix on Thursday convicted a man charged in the 1991 killings of nine people, including six Buddhist monks, bringing an end to a bizarre decades-long case that involved multiple trials and evidence of overzealous police interview tactics. Johnathan A. Doody sat impassively in Maricopa County Superior Court as a clerk read guilty verdicts in a robbery gone bad nearly a quarter-century ago: nine counts of first-degree murder, nine counts of armed robbery and single counts of burglary and conspiracy to commit armed robbery.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2014 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
In a canvas tent in the Himalayan foothills, where winter breaths drifted in the twilight, Tibetan monks, their feet dangling from benches, watched a pirated copy of "Titanic. " The diminutive men, camped along a rutted road leading to the Dalai Lama's residence in exile near Dharamsala, India, did not understand what Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio were saying. But they knew the sleek black steel and tinkling jewelry were sailing toward doom. A cold wind shook the tent, but the monks, some fidgeting with prayer beads, others bundling their burgundy robes in coats, were entranced at the grainy spectacle before them.
WORLD
October 27, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
THABYUCHAING, Myanmar - U Abdul Samat spent his life farming the rice paddies that stretched, brilliant green, in all directions. Now he was nearly 90 years old, a great-grandfather who walked with a cane. He was also a Muslim, and the men who stormed his village with machetes were Buddhists looking for Muslims to kill. As the mob set fire to more than 100 homes not marked with a Buddhist flag, Abdul's neighbors took cover at the mosque. But Abdul wasn't quick enough. According to a survivor, the old man was killed by an assailant who swung a heavy sword into the back of his head.
NATIONAL
September 16, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and David Zucchino
WHITE SETTLEMENT, Texas - To Kristi Suthamtewakul, Aaron Alexis was a gentle young man who taught himself to speak Thai for his waiter's job and chanted Thai prayers at a Buddhist temple. Alexis wore a golden amulet of Buddha around his neck, she recalled, yet also carried a concealed .45-caliber handgun. To a Fort Worth neighbor and a Seattle construction worker, Alexis - accused of gunning down workers at the Washington Navy Yard on Monday - was a brooding, menacing figure quick to brandish and fire a gun. Alexis, 34, a former Navy electrician's mate working as a government subcontractor, was shot and killed by police after he gunned down 12 people, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
For hours, the meditation hall at Lu Mountain Temple in the south San Gabriel Valley hummed with muted chatter and camera shutter-clicks. Around the room, glass display cases held translucent urns and miniature versions of dome-shaped Buddhist shrines, or stupas, delicately arranged on burgundy-colored cloth. The urns and stupas held thousands of bright pearl-like crystals believed to be relics of the Buddha, his relatives and his disciples. A wide-eyed Julie Nguyen of Orange County stepped sideways in front of one of the display cases.
TRAVEL
November 8, 1992
Your Oct. 11 article, "Through Monastery and Village in Sikkim," contains material that is offensive to Buddhists. The author describes his visit to Rumtek Monastery and his encounter with someone he calls "Jangen Rinpoche." It is clear that he is actually referring to His Eminence Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche, who was one of the highest and most world-renowned spiritual authorities of the Kagyu Tradition of Buddhism. His Eminence was tragically killed in an automobile accident shortly after your correspondent's encounter with him, and Buddhists are observing mourning for him. Certainly there is no reason the author would have known this.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1997
The comment by Cynthia Duffy in the March 6 article about Yorba Linda's refusal to allow a Buddhist group to build a monastery in the city was unfortunate for two reasons. First, she appears to know little about Buddhism. Buddhists--especially of the more traditional Theravada variety, which is followed by the Myanmar Society of America which requested the building permit--are atheistic. They worship none of the "pagan gods" to whom Duffy referred. Instead, Buddhists venerate the historical Gautama Buddha, who founded the religion, as well as other Buddhas who have helped humans on their quest for enlightenment and Nirvana.
WORLD
May 28, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - A watchdog group Tuesday called on Myanmar's government to immediately revoke a population-control policy that blocks members of the minority Rohingya Muslim community from having more than two children, saying the newly revived measure is discriminatory, violates human rights and endangers women's health. The Rohingya, who account for about 1 million of Myanmar's 60 million people, are deeply unpopular among the Buddhist majority, who do not consider them citizens even though many Rohingya families have lived in the country for generations.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2013 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS - On a warm Sunday afternoon, the Rev. Douglas Kanai wore a serene expression as Buddhist followers surrounded him outside his new storefront temple, sandwiched between a used-car dealer and a tax preparer's office. But his stories were far from peaceful, and the scene he described was not desert Nevada but faraway Tokyo in the dead of winter. The gambling mecca's roaring city traffic muffled his soft-spoken tales of physical endurance and a profound search for inner willpower that would eventually sustain him. To prove he possessed the fortitude to lead his own Nichiren temple, Kanai had to endure a test known in Japan as the "100 days.
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