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Budget Crisis

NEWS
October 8, 1990 | PATRICIA KLEIN LERNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scott and Sandy Palmer of Riverside County had excitedly packed up their three kids, the dog, the family bicycles and their camping gear for a long-awaited vacation to this national treasure. But it didn't take long for their plans to go haywire. "We drove in last night after a 12-hour drive that cost $75 in gas and found out we had to turn right back and go home again," Scott Palmer grumbled Sunday. "Our family vacation is ruined."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2002 | Gregg Jones, Times Staff Writer
For all the stump speeches about better schools and safer streets, for all the mudslinging over campaign contributions and offshore tax shelters, California's next governor will wake up Wednesday facing one overwhelming issue. The winner of Tuesday's election will have barely two months to propose at least $10 billion in budget cuts, tax increases and other "revenue enhancements" -- and possibly as much as $20 billion, an amount equivalent to one-fifth of the $98.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | RICHARD T. COOPER and JOHN BECKHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Wrapped in the silence of winter, with their houses and storefronts anchored like tree trunks to the snow-covered prairie that stretches from the edge of town to the gray edge of the sky, the 9,800 citizens of this rural community seem almost unimaginably distant from the budget crisis in Washington. At the 19th-century baroque courthouse, where golden light from the chandeliers is reflected off dark wood paneling, lawyers drone through matters of minor crime and civil dispute.
NEWS
August 7, 1992 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 30 years Harold Epstein's company has had a contract with the state to provide food to prisons, youth authorities and mental institutions, but in mid-July Epstein did something he had never done before. He stopped delivering his products to the state. "With me it's the same as with the people I buy from," said Epstein. "You don't pay me, you don't get it."
BUSINESS
October 14, 1990 | LAURA D'ANDREA TYSON, LAURA D'ANDREA TYSON is professor of economics at UC Berkeley and research director of the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy
Who is more to blame for the current budgetary catastrophe? Is it the President and his aides? For months they arrogantly refused to concede the need for new revenues, despite mounting deficit projections. And they stymied the negotiation process until the 11th hour by their adamant insistence on a capital gains tax cut whose benefits they misjudged and misrepresented. Or is it perhaps the Congress?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1994 | HENRY CHU
Over the past year, the cash-strapped Metropolitan Transportation Authority has eliminated more than 500 jobs and handed pink slips to scores of employees in an effort to erase a $300-million deficit. So how is it that the MTA's new $2.9-billion budget holds the promise of 120 more full-time positions than it had last year? Welcome to the Byzantine world of budgeting in an agency that needs 13 people just to balance its books.
NEWS
January 11, 1993 | GEORGE SKELTON
Forget for a moment all that government jargon about fiscal years, general funds, grants, shifts and rollovers. Maybe the best way to look at this new state budget fight is through the eyes of an ordinary working couple, as they might their own financial situation. They're facing up to the reality, let's say, that the family income is falling. But they're both still working long hours, so they reject the notion of burdening themselves with an extra job.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A youth offender camp near Mariposa is one of four California Youth Authority mountain camps that may close as a result of the state's budget crisis. Shutting the Mt. Bullion camp is one way to trim $50 million from the department's budget, said spokeswoman Sarah Andrade. But she stressed that no decisions are certain. Mt. Bullion serves about 100 inmates age 18 to 25. The other three camps on the possible closure list are near Santa Cruz, Nevada City and Pine Grove.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1992
Blue Cross of California, the state's largest health insurer, has established two short-term assistance funds for hospitals providing Medi-Cal services during the state budget crisis. The Woodland Hills company said the funds are designed to assure that emergency room, obstetric and pediatric services continue despite the budget impasse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1988 | From Times wire service reports
The Board of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church, facing a budgetary crisis, is in the midst of a substantial wave of personnel changes for the second time in six months. At meetings in New York, directors of the board's national division voted to eliminate 11 mid-level positions and six support staff jobs as part of a $2-million budget cut.
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