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Budget Freeze

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NEWS
February 7, 1991
In anticipation of a revenue shortfall because of the possible closure of the Azusa Land Reclamation Co. landfill, the City Council on Monday unanimously approved a freeze on all non-budgeted items. The state Supreme Court last week let stand a lower court decision that would temporarily halt dumping at the landfill until an environmental review is conducted. The privately owned landfill generates $1.8 million in fees annually for the city.
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OPINION
May 27, 2007
Re "Is gov.'s budget picking on the helpless or using them as bargaining chips?" column, May 17 The governor's proposed budget would freeze payments for the care of the state's most vulnerable and abused children for the sixth year in a row, resulting in a 20% cumulative cut in support since 2001. No one can question that the lives of foster children are improved through the love and nurturing that they receive from stable caregivers. When the state fails to provide adequate financial support, good families and youth counselors turn away from foster care-giving and high-quality group homes close their doors.
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NEWS
May 20, 1985 | GAYLORD SHAW, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger said Sunday that a congressional freeze on military spending would be "very damaging . . . to national security," but Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.) charged that the Pentagon had collected as much as $50 billion more than it needed because of overstated inflation estimates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1992 | CAITLIN ROTHER
The Camarillo City Council has adopted a 1992-93 budget of $29.67 million for the city and the Camarillo Sanitary District, maintaining the same level of city services as this year. And in a separate vote Wednesday, the council also placed a first-time freeze on salary increases for the 110 employees of the city and sanitary district. The freeze will remain in place until city officials get a clearer picture of how the state budget will affect Camarillo, officials said.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1988 | Michael J. Boskin, MICHAEL J. BOSKIN is Wohlford Professor of Economics at Stanford University
There is widespread agreement that the major economic problems facing the United States stem from our large federal government budget deficit. For several years, we had budget deficits on the order of $200 billion, or 5% of gross national product; last year's deficit was about three-fourths that size. Such deficits are unusual during prosperous peacetime, although common during the depths of recessions and wartime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1990 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Municipal spending on arts, parks and recreation, community services, libraries, lifeguards and social service programs and safety services would be frozen at current levels under a partial budget freeze decided upon Thursday by the San Diego City Council. The council action directly undercuts a city manager's proposal that would have eliminated arts funding and cut in half funding for parks, pools and libraries.
NEWS
July 31, 1986
The Justice Department, facing a budget shortfall, has ordered its 93 U.S. attorneys to begin no new investigations that involve travel or legal expenses for the next two months. The department, in an internal memo, also told its chief prosecutors to stop using computer research services, limit travel for ongoing investigations, seek to delay court cases, buy no new equipment and reduce orders for court and grand jury transcripts until the 1986 fiscal year ends Sept. 30.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig accused Gov. George Deukmejian and Administration officials Thursday of having "sinister" motives in their campaign to blame the state's budget problems on Proposition 98, the school-funding initiative. Honig, appearing before the Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee, criticized Deukmejian in the strongest terms he has used since the two officeholders supposedly patched up their political differences last year.
NEWS
May 11, 1989
Free-Mail Issue By a vote of 174 to 231, the House defeated legislation (HR 1149) allowing members of Congress to mail copies of the Constitution bearing their name to all households back home. The bill sought to ease franking, or free mail, rules to permit the one-time mass mailing at a projected cost of $10 million. Supporter Lindy Boggs (D-La.) said the mailing would be "a great service to all of the people of the United States" in the bicentennial year of the Congress.
NEWS
May 11, 1989
By a vote of 174 to 231, the House defeated legislation (HR 1149) allowing members of Congress to mail copies of the Constitution bearing their name to all households back home. The bill sought to ease franking, or free-mail, rules to permit the onetime mass mailing at a projected cost of $10 million. Supporter Lindy Boggs (D-La.) said the mailing would be "a great service to all of the people of the United States" in this bicentennial year of the Congress. Opponent Bill Frenzel (R-Minn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1992 | LEN HALL
After adopting a fiscal 1992 budget this week showing $11.5 million in general fund revenues, the City Council temporarily froze all spending except for what is needed to keep the city operating. The action Tuesday night was taken to meet next Tuesday's deadline for adopting a budget by the end of the current fiscal year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1992 | LARRY SPEER
The Ojai City Council approved a $4.4-million city budget on Tuesday, but voted to freeze spending in a number of areas in anticipation of state cuts in property and vehicle registration revenue for cities. The council's action means that more than $440,000 of planned expenditures will be withheld until more is known about the proposed state budget cuts. Included in the freeze is a 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS
The Moorpark Unified School District is scheduled to vote Tuesday on a proposed 1992-93 budget that would add six new teaching positions but continue the hiring freeze on clerical and maintenance workers. The proposed budget assumes that the Legislature will reduce schools' funding from $3,364 to $2,910 per student, said Carmela Vignocchi, assistant superintendent of business services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1992 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego County officials unveiled a lean $1.9-billion budget Thursday that falls woefully short of funding existing programs and could get worse if the recession causes the state to cut funding for local government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1991 | LYNDA NATALI
Despite a $1.5-million shortfall, the City Council has balanced the city's $32-million budget without dipping into residents' pockets. While keeping a lid on taxes, the council last week approved a hiring freeze and increases in user fees. More than 20 city jobs will remain vacant next year at an estimated savings of $586,000. The staff vacancies are spread across six departments, including two police officer jobs and one fire captain post. Several part-time positions are also included.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1991 | ZION BANKS
Citing a $1.6-million loss of lottery funds and unexpected district expenses, Newport-Mesa Unified School District Supt. John W. Nicoll warned the school board this week that a freeze on programs may be necessary to avoid a 1991-92 budget deficit that could run as high as $2 million. The programs most likely to be affected are a $520,000 expansion of a computer technology program and a $100,000 library automation project, Nicoll told the board.
NEWS
February 7, 1991
In anticipation of a revenue shortfall because of the possible closure of the Azusa Land Reclamation Co. landfill, the City Council on Monday unanimously approved a freeze on all non-budgeted items. The state Supreme Court last week let stand a lower court decision that would temporarily halt dumping at the landfill until an environmental review is conducted. The privately owned landfill generates $1.8 million in fees annually for the city.
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